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Re: swan neutering

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  • Kimberley
    What we do at our zoo is wait until the swan completes her laying and switch her eggs with 4 dummies. You can pull them when she eithers abandons them or pull
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 28, 2007
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      What we do at our zoo is wait until the swan completes her laying and
      switch her eggs with 4 dummies. You can pull them when she eithers
      abandons them or pull them after the alloted incubation time ( I think
      it is 35-40 days). By doing this, the swans won't re-clutch quickly.

      Kim




      --- In zookeeper@yahoogroups.com, "Ashley" <dodger_bird@...> wrote:
      >
      > Laura-
      >
      > From everything I've ever heard, it's far too risky for the bird.
      > Both the anesthesia and the operation itself. Since everything is
      > internal, it's not nearly as easy as it is with mammals. What I would
      > recommend, and seems to work best, is simply replacing all the eggs
      > the female lays with dummies. It's cheap, easy, and you only have to
      > do this once a day (if even). It's a quick extension of normal
      > cleaning procedures.
      >
      > Good luck
      > Ashley
      >
      > --- In zookeeper@yahoogroups.com, "glendahobbes" reisepiece@ wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi all-
      > >
      > > Has anyone ever heard of a zoo or private facility neutering their
      > > swans to inhibit reproduction? I know there are other non-invasive
      > > measures you could take, but I'm curious if this is a procedure ever
      > > attempted.
      > >
      > > Thanks!
      > > Laura R.
      > >
      >
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