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  • Alexander Kurtz
    Hi Susan, I don´t know your husband. During my time here at the Holloman AFB, there were no 135´s or C-18 landing. We have here a couple of stealth´s,
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 29 12:25 AM
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      Hi Susan,
      I don�t know your husband. During my time here at the Holloman AFB,
      there were no 135�s or C-18 landing. We have here a couple of stealth�s,
      German Tornado�s and F-4�s. Sorry.
      At the zoo, we have only one female cougar, 2 bobcats and one male ocelot. It
      is only a very small zoo. They don�t even have a homepage. I have a lot of
      pictures of the cats, but I simply don�t have the time to put them on my
      homepage. We are almost done building our new cougar- and bearexhibit. So, in
      the second week of june, we will move our cougress in her new cage and we even
      get a new cougar. I only hope, that the two will get along fine. Any
      suggestions for the introduction of the two to each other?
      At all the places I�ve volunteered so far, I never had the chance to see or
      work around jaguars and cheetahs. I�m not even sure, wheather I�ve ever seen
      one of those in my whole live (except on pictures or TV of course). Is the
      character/behavior of a jaguar much different from that of an leopard? Maybe,
      with lots of luck, I�ll have the possibility to see a real cheetah at a
      friends place in august. If I could make it to their place, that would be
      really great.
      The *mean sounding* noise of the ocelot confused me at the beginning too. But
      once one of the more experienced volunteers told me, that the ocelot actually
      is very happy, and when she (the ocelot) actually rubbed her head against my
      knees, things worked out very nicely. When I then started to volunteer at the
      zoo in Alamogordo, everybody that worked here, was afraid of the ocelot. They
      told me, that he is mean and dangerous and that he actually had clawed some of
      the zookeepers before. Well... it took me some time but now, he will
      occasionally come up to the fence and sniff on my hand, but he won�t claw or
      harm me. Even when I clean his cage, he might run around my feet or even sit
      right next to my head on one of his branches in the cage, but he won�t even
      try to make something bad. The zookeepers think, that I�m crazy to spend so
      much time with the cats, but in my opinion animal-human relations/contacts are
      very importent, espacially since there is not much enviromental enrichment in
      their cages... except the occasional squirrel, mouse or bird. And in my
      opinion, it pays off.
      Alex.
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------
      e-mail: Luchsmond@...
      Homepage: http://members.xoom.com/Luchsmond/


      Jagpad@... wrote:
      From: Jagpad@...


      >Alex,
      > My husband makes runs out to NM. He flies 135's and C18's. Who knows, >you
      may know him.
      >His name is Randy Porter. You can see his photo on my volunteer page. He
      >volunteers quite
      >often.
      > What cats do they have at the zoo? Do they have a web site? Some of >my
      favorites are
      >jaguars. But, I love all of them. Recently I've been getting to know a
      >margay on a new level.
      >She is finally trusting me enough to let me hold her. She makes the *mean
      >sounding* noise that
      >the ocelot does. When ever people hear our ocelot Peaches they think >she's
      mad when in
      >reality it's her happy noise.
      >
      >Susan
      >http://www.geocities.com/~Jagpad


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    • Jazmyn Concolor
      I ve noticed that the subscriptions to the mailing list have been growing quickly since I put the list up a few days ago. Feel free to introduce yourselves or
      Message 2 of 5 , May 11 12:16 AM
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        I've noticed that the subscriptions to the mailing list have been
        growing quickly since I put the list up a few days ago. Feel free to
        introduce yourselves or start up a topic or otherwise get things going.

        I'm the moderator.. While I am not directly a professional zookeeper, I
        do maintain an educational website for helping people find exotic animal
        care info so the 'cute exotic pet' they bought might not suffer from
        simple ignorance and I do rescue of small exotic pets, such as sugar
        gliders. I used to do volunteer ast zookeeping, working around small
        primates, wallabies and such, mostly doing diet prep and cleaning. I've
        seen zoos from both sides of the fence and feel they are a great
        educational tool in many ways, even if I discovered that many zookeepers
        relate better with animals then the public, which is where the docent
        programs seem to have sprung from over the years. Indeed, zoos have
        made remarkable strides in public education over the years due to
        changes in policy and practices. The sterile zoos of the 'old days' are
        fast disappearing, replaced by mini-enviroments that are often so nice,
        that I wouldn't mind living in one myself. Mental stimulation in the
        form of enrichment items or interaction with their keepers is resulting
        in animals less prone to stress related illness.

        All in all, there are a lot of facets to modern zookeeping that make it
        a career worthy of any animal lover.
      • Jagpad@xxxx.xxx
        Hi. I am Susan Porter. I work with exotic felines ranging from the small margay to the large siberian tiger. We now have approximately 65 cats at the center. I
        Message 3 of 5 , May 11 10:29 AM
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          Hi. I am Susan Porter. I work with exotic felines ranging from the small
          margay to the large siberian tiger. We now have approximately 65 cats at the
          center. I clean cages, prepare food and feed, give meds, get involved with
          medical procedures (c-sections, recessitating, surgeries, check-ups,
          necropsies). I train volunteers to clean and what to look for when observing
          the cats. I watch for cats that go into heat and put cats together for
          breeding. Also, get to watch for cats that are due. We have 3 jaguar cubs
          that just turned a year old that I helped bottle-fed on a daily basis,
          stimulated, exercised, kept records, etc. in the nursery. Well, that's
          about it.

          Susan
          http://www.geocities.com/~Jagpad
        • Jagpad@xxxx.xxx
          ... Randy told me that he flies into Kirkland. Oh well, you never know unless you ask. ... Will they have their own places first, maybe next to eachother. When
          Message 4 of 5 , May 28 11:48 AM
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            Alexander Kurtz wrote:

            > From: Alexander Kurtz <Luchsmond@...>
            >
            > Hi Susan,
            > I don�t know your husband. During my time here at the Holloman AFB,
            > there were no 135�s or C-18 landing. We have here a couple of stealth�s,
            > German Tornado�s and F-4�s. Sorry.

            Randy told me that he flies into Kirkland. Oh well, you never know unless you ask.

            >
            > At the zoo, we have only one female cougar, 2 bobcats and one male ocelot. It
            > is only a very small zoo. They don�t even have a homepage. I have a lot of
            > pictures of the cats, but I simply don�t have the time to put them on my
            > homepage. We are almost done building our new cougar- and bearexhibit. So, in
            > the second week of june, we will move our cougress in her new cage and we even
            > get a new cougar. I only hope, that the two will get along fine. Any
            > suggestions for the introduction of the two to each other?

            Will they have their own places first, maybe next to eachother. When we are planning to
            introduce a pair we place them in enclosures next to eachother. That way they can get to know
            eachother before getting together. We leave them like that until it looks like they are
            enjoying eachothers company through the fencing. We have guillotine doors and we will open
            them to let the pair in together. We have hoses ready just in case they don't get along. Of
            course, our pairing is done to breed. So it's male and female. What is the new cougar that's
            coming? Is it a male?

            >
            > At all the places I�ve volunteered so far, I never had the chance to see or
            > work around jaguars and cheetahs. I�m not even sure, wheather I�ve ever seen
            > one of those in my whole live (except on pictures or TV of course). Is the
            > character/behavior of a jaguar much different from that of an leopard?

            It's easier to read a leopard. They show more body signs. Of course, once you get used to
            working with jaguars you do learn their subtle behaviors. You always need to be very alert
            around the little or should I say big stinkers. I really like them a lot! They are fascinating
            to me.

            > Maybe,
            > with lots of luck, I�ll have the possibility to see a real cheetah at a
            > friends place in august. If I could make it to their place, that would be
            > really great.
            > The *mean sounding* noise of the ocelot confused me at the beginning too. But
            > once one of the more experienced volunteers told me, that the ocelot actually
            > is very happy, and when she (the ocelot) actually rubbed her head against my
            > knees, things worked out very nicely. When I then started to volunteer at the
            > zoo in Alamogordo, everybody that worked here, was afraid of the ocelot. They
            > told me, that he is mean and dangerous and that he actually had clawed some of
            > the zookeepers before. Well... it took me some time but now, he will
            > occasionally come up to the fence and sniff on my hand, but he won�t claw or
            > harm me. Even when I clean his cage, he might run around my feet or even sit
            > right next to my head on one of his branches in the cage, but he won�t even
            > try to make something bad. The zookeepers think, that I�m crazy to spend so
            > much time with the cats, but in my opinion animal-human relations/contacts are
            > very importent, espacially since there is not much enviromental enrichment in
            > their cages... except the occasional squirrel, mouse or bird. And in my
            > opinion, it pays off.
            > Alex.

            I really enjoy spending time with the cats. After the day is done, I'm exhausted from all the
            work, but I still go out and say hi to everybody. It usually takes an hour since we have
            approx. 65 cats. I say hi to everyone. Some I go in with, some I greet from outside the
            enclosure and scratch. Some are very aggressive and I just stand there and talk with them,
            they really seem to enjoy it.

            Susan
            http://www.geocities.com/~Jagpad

            >
            > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > e-mail: Luchsmond@...
            > Homepage: http://members.xoom.com/Luchsmond/
            >
            > Jagpad@... wrote:
            > From: Jagpad@...
            >
            > >Alex,
            > > My husband makes runs out to NM. He flies 135's and C18's. Who knows, >you
            > may know him.
            > >His name is Randy Porter. You can see his photo on my volunteer page. He
            > >volunteers quite
            > >often.
            > > What cats do they have at the zoo? Do they have a web site? Some of >my
            > favorites are
            > >jaguars. But, I love all of them. Recently I've been getting to know a
            > >margay on a new level.
            > >She is finally trusting me enough to let me hold her. She makes the *mean
            > >sounding* noise that
            > >the ocelot does. When ever people hear our ocelot Peaches they think >she's
            > mad when in
            > >reality it's her happy noise.
            > >
            > >Susan
            > >http://www.geocities.com/~Jagpad
            >
            > ____________________________________________________________________
            > Get your own FREE, personal Netscape WebMail account today at http://webmail.netscape.com
            >
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          • Mary Robbins
            Alex, I saw your EMail and your question about jaguars. I ll fill you in on a few details about two jaguars I owned: My first was adorable. I got him at three
            Message 5 of 5 , May 31 7:59 AM
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              Alex, I saw your EMail and your question about jaguars. I'll fill you in
              on a few details about two jaguars I owned:

              My first was adorable. I got him at three weeks old. We got our first
              hint of what we then called a "reversion temperament" at only nine weeks
              old. (In the days of no internet, there were no others to discuss this
              with.) We briefly left him in our van conversion, then went out to find
              he had discovered our box of Kentucky Fried Chicken. As we opened the
              side door of the van we were greeted with vivid green eyes, lit as with
              neon, and miniature hiss and growl. (If you ever doubted tales of
              animals' eyes lit up without benefit of reflected light, trust me, it
              happens.) We both laughed, but knew this was a cat we were going to have
              to watch closely. We were careful how we removed the offending box even
              then, since a nine-week-old with all his claws and teeth could be pretty
              offensive, himself. As he grew, we had him declawed and his adult teeth
              altered with a pulpotomy. We found him to be a loveable cat who adored
              the world of humanity, as long as he was not allowed to get hold of
              something he considered "his". When he did, he became instantly a
              totally wild animal again, and very dangerous. I looked outside when I
              heard his tiny growl one day when he was about three months old, and saw
              he had broken into the cage with an 18-month-old cougar. He had the
              cougars old boot, and the cougar was backed into a corner. At nine
              months old, I knocked him out of the air on the way to my throat, over a
              rubber hose he decided was his personal possession. We did not feed raw
              meat to this cat, since it made this temperament worse and he was bad
              enough without it.

              Five minutes after returning him to his cage after the hose incident, he
              was back to his normal, loving self, as always. I slept with my head on
              his stomach one night on a grassy knoll, the cougar asleep beside me. I
              eventually returned him to someone with a female jaguar for breeding,
              however, and was very sorry of the necessity, because I did not like
              their facilities. I was young and stupid then, but my admonishment to
              anyone today would be to NOT get any large cat unless you are
              financially secure and extremely stable. I have seen many animals lost
              or moved due to divorce and loss of land.

              Mancho was thought to be possibly a jaguar/leopard cross, which could
              account for his temperament and size that was shaped like a jag, but
              smaller than most. My second jaguar, B.J., (along with an 18-month-old
              lion, Lucki) and another jaguar I knew personally, J.J., were pussycats
              at heart, and as of 18 months old all three of these cats could be fed
              raw meat out of one's hand. They would lick the blood from your fingers
              and do it very carefully. But I didn't know them after they were fully
              mature, so I can't say what happened then. My experience is limited to
              only these three jaguars, although I knew of another that was kept in a
              filling station! He apparently loved everyone, but I didn't know how old
              he was. As a juvenile, this could be. As an adult, who can say.

              Jagaurs, at one time, were plentiful and easy to get in Texas--too easy.
              Maybe still are, I don't know. I wouldn't trade my personal relationship
              with these, which also involved swimming, surfing, and other delights,
              for anything in the world. But I would never encourage anyone to get a
              jaguar unless they are experienced with big cats, financially stable,
              and able to keep them in a safe, secure, large natural habitat. Jaguars
              delight in swimming, for example, and need a large pool. They should be
              kept safe from the public, and the public safe from them (as should all
              animals, whether exotic or domestic).

              --
              T.Mary
              http://www.alagahi.com

              Life is full of problems and inconveniences, and one of the biggest
              problems is people who can't tell the difference.
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