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[zeph] Digest #6

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  • !Namo@mituofO!
    Zeph&Frens Digest #6 __________________________________ (S)ome Replies (J)ames: It may sound really interesting and entertaining, but I have decided that it is
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 20, 2000
      Zeph&Frens Digest #6
      __________________________________
      (S)ome Replies

      (J)ames: It may sound really interesting and entertaining, but I have
      decided that it
      is not necessary for you to know.

      S: Are you sure it may sound really interesting and entertaining? You make
      me so curious. Please let us know more.

      J: Round off: Just came back from a backpack in Thailand, which get me a
      little
      interested and curious in Buddhism. Been recommended some literature, and
      have read with interest. What really interest me about Buddhism is that
      while Christians friends have so much emphasized the reality of self or ego,
      and the continuity of it to all eternity either in heaven or hell, Buddhism
      teaches that there is really no self, a very interesting and curious point
      (or insight, shall I say?) which coincide with my phenomenological research.
      Can't really find Buddhist books on this particular area as all books that I
      browse in bookshop tend to be too general for my field of interest. Any
      recommendations is welcomed.

      S: Please visit the Buddhist Library @
      http://sunflower.singnet.com.sg/~buddhlib/
      Address: No. 2, Lorong 24A Geylang Road, Singapore 398526
      Telephone: (65)746-8435. It has a great collection of books, including what
      you are looking for.

      J: Reading the life of Buddha tells me that he was a man of incredible
      self-control (long years of practiced self-control and 'purification of the
      mind'); he mastered (through sublimation or meditation?) all of the beastly,
      destructive; especially the self-destructive drives within himself, the
      all-too-human passions and fears. He left the comfort, luxury and security
      of a princely life for 'truth', so that he could benefit not only himself,
      but all sentient beings. It was a noble act on his part. In him, one
      appreciates strength of one who does not look for it; unlike the great
      conquerors who used political power, he was simple, mild and pleasant,
      without the least desire to rule (though the rights was his, being a
      prince) --- he gave man the dignity and respect to choose for themselves. He
      need not lift his finger and we can appreciate power within such, even if,
      during his lifetime, he bury himself quietly in a park (?). I still think of
      him as a human being --- but one of the highest specimen of man there is,
      past, present or future, one of the true human being. Thanks for the
      sharing, the positive ones as well as the negative comments on me.

      S: It is simple- as you said, the Buddha is the highest specimen of man
      there is, past, present or future, one of the true human being. He is the
      peak of physical and spiritual evolution. It is exactly this which renders
      him a non-human- a Buddha- belonging to a race of Enlightened beings. He is
      not "just another man" on the street. And his experience tells us we can
      become Buddhas too.

      Metta: shian
      __________________________________
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