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1 More Response to "A Matter of Life & Death : Comtemplating Suicide"

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  • NamoAmituofo
    Hi, with reference to the 9 responses, I like to comment on the issue of A Matter of Life & Death: Contemplating Suicide . First, instead of thinking & hoping
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 8, 2004
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      Hi, with reference to the 9 responses, I like to comment on the issue of "A Matter of Life & Death: Contemplating Suicide".

      First, instead of thinking & hoping that "Sunshine comes after the rain. Everything will be fine", the Dharma teaches us the impermanence of life (good things will end, likewise for bad things which happened to us). The former may end up deluding oneself, if thing(s) do not turn out 'fine' as one has expected, since afterall, one cannot tell the future.

      Second, I beg to differ that "There's no one to help you. One is really totally left alone. Even your loved ones can't help you. In the end, you are left with yourself, to face death."

      In the chapter "Spiritual Help for the Dying" of "The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying"(10th Anniversary Edition Revised and Updated) by Sogyal Rinpoche, he wrote that "My master Dudjom Rinpoche used to say that to help a dying person is like holding out a hand to someone who is on the point of falling over, to lift them up. Through the strength and peace and deep compassionate attention of your presence, you will help then awaken to their own strength. The quality of your presence at this most vulnerable and extreme moment is all-important."

      Lastly, I like to thank Shian for sharing the article.

      From Green_i

    • kok_tong76
      Hi, what I wrote There s no one to help you. One is really totally left alone. Even your loved ones can t help you. In the end, you are left with yourself, to
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 9, 2004
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        Hi, what I wrote "There's no one to help you. One is really totally
        left alone. Even your loved ones can't help you. In the end, you are
        left with yourself, to face death " was just my own experience with
        facing death. At that time, I did not have the conditions of having
        my loved ones, or any compassionate beings with me (which is good in
        a way). So this is my own reflection on it. I apologise if it has
        caused any discomfort. But I do agree with the statement "to help a
        dying person is like holding out a hand to someone who is on the
        point of falling over, to lift them up. Through the strength and
        peace and deep compassionate attention of your presence, you will
        help then awaken to their own strength. The quality of your presence
        at this most vulnerable and extreme moment is all-important." May
        all beings have the good karma of having somebody like that during
        this passing stage, and may all beings pass through this stage
        gracefully.

        --- In zeph@yahoogroups.com, "NamoAmituofo" <shian@k...> wrote:
        > Hi, with reference to the 9 responses, I like to comment on the
        issue of "A Matter of Life & Death: Contemplating Suicide".
        >
        > First, instead of thinking & hoping that "Sunshine comes after the
        rain. Everything will be fine", the Dharma teaches us the
        impermanence of life (good things will end, likewise for bad things
        which happened to us). The former may end up deluding oneself, if
        thing(s) do not turn out 'fine' as one has expected, since afterall,
        one cannot tell the future.
        >
        > Second, I beg to differ that "There's no one to help you. One is
        really totally left alone. Even your loved ones can't help you. In
        the end, you are left with yourself, to face death."
        >
        > In the chapter "Spiritual Help for the Dying" of "The Tibetan Book
        of Living and Dying"(10th Anniversary Edition Revised and Updated)
        by Sogyal Rinpoche, he wrote that "My master Dudjom Rinpoche used to
        say that to help a dying person is like holding out a hand to
        someone who is on the point of falling over, to lift them up.
        Through the strength and peace and deep compassionate attention of
        your presence, you will help then awaken to their own strength. The
        quality of your presence at this most vulnerable and extreme moment
        is all-important."
        >
        > Lastly, I like to thank Shian for sharing the article.
        >
        > From Green_i
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