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Re: [zeph] A Blind Fool's Reflection

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  • James Ong
    Ya, 3 cheers to all of u! . ... From: David Leong To: zeph@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, November 30, 2003 6:39 AM Subject: Re: [zeph] A Blind Fool s
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 30, 2003
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      Ya, 3 cheers to all of u!
      .
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, November 30, 2003 6:39 AM
      Subject: Re: [zeph] A Blind Fool's Reflection

      Hi Friends,
       
      I like this one because I am one of them too. Realising for being among one of the blinds do help me to reflect myself constantly. There are always rooms for improvement in this measurable world, isn't it? The tool of 'mind grinding mind' do help to certain extent. Once the mirror is polished it is getting clearer & clearer... then we wish & vow others do the same too until no-one there... Am I talking to myself or blinds? Ha ha ha! Isn't this a great joke in life too, SIRS? Thanks for the wonderful article contributed. 3 CHEERS~~~
       
      david
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Tuesday, November 18, 2003 2:02 PM
      Subject: [zeph] A Blind Fool's Reflection

      For www.TheDailyEnlightenment.com

      A Blind Fool's Reflection


       
       

       "If your eyes are even slightly blurred, 
        all you see will be hallucinations
      ."

       
      -Zen Saying


      "These are some blind thoughts of a blind fool, beseeching himself to see. I wrote this for my reflection and re-reading. If you happen to see this, I hope it helps you too."


      There are two partially blind men, who did not realise their condition. One had only long-sightedness and the other short-sightedness. Because each could see what each could so clearly, and because each could not see or even imagine the clarity of what the other sees, each assumes each are the only ones who have perfect eyesight, that the other is blind, or even deluded. They thus argue day and night over who has proper vision.

      Sometimes one of them sees something that is relevant to both of them. The one who saw it would be gloating, affirming to himself the reality of his vision, while affirming the other's lack of vision. But sometimes, the above happens to the other one too. The two thus constantly bicker over who is more often right, both thinking the correct views of each other as flukes.

      Having read the above, you might think you would not be as blind as the above men. But the truth is, as long as we are unenlightened, we are all partially blind - that's what makes it more tricky. For how do you, for example, describe some colours to a colour-blind person, who cannot even imagine the very colours he can't see - while he sees other colours clearly?

      How do we know when someone's vision is true, when you do not see what he sees? You can't share someone's true vision - unless you realise you are as blind as you are not enlightened, and strive to open your heart, mind and eyes. We do not see things the way they truly are; but in the way we want, in the way we think they are, in the way we can see.

      So what is true vision? True vision is what you see zoomed in and out. As both the near and far constitute reality, true vision sees both the microscopic and macroscopic according to need. Short or long-sightedness is half-sightedness; not the complete vision of reality. We are of course not just talking about physical sight here, but rather, of the spiritual or mental aspect. If you only see yourself in the moment and cling to it, taking your "self" to be real and unchanging, that is spiritual short-sightedness, not realising that both the physical and mental aspects of your "self" change. Not seeing this is the lack of wisdom. Spiritual short-sightedness is also wanting to save only your "self", not realising that the illusion of "self" means we are all one. Not seeing this is the lack of compassion. Spiritual long-sightedness is having "too far-reaching" compassion, which lacks wisdom, wanting to be the impossible Bodhisattva to save all, while forgetting to first be one's own Bodhisattva. Spiritual long-sightedness can also manifest as the lack of compassion for those immediate to you, as you focus only on helping "strangers out there", forgetting those you already have strong karmic affinity with - your family and friends.

      But these are mere examples. Spiritual blindness manifest as blindspots in many more ways. We all have blindspots, even if you can't see them - that's why they are called blindspots. If by the end of this article, you are thinking only about people you know who fit the above description, then I'm afraid this article has failed - for its primary purpose is to remind you that you are blind too. And often so blind that you only see others as blind. Are you blind? Believe it. No - know it! These are some blind thoughts of a blind fool, beseeching himself to see. I wrote this for my reflection and re-reading. If you happen to see this, I hope it helps you too. If you have been reading it as if the blind person(s) were someone else, please read this article again. Self-reflection is the only way to save yourself. Self-reflection is the only way to save the world. All the Buddhas can only encourage us to do so.





      "The fool who knows he is a fool, is wise.
       The fool who thinks himself wise, is a real fool."

       -The Buddha

      blindfool@... 



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