Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Marklin 2-10-0

Expand Messages
  • dpstripe
    This is sort of a bizarre question. It goes out to anyone with knowledge of Marklin s 88836 DRG class 52. Is that the same 2-10-0 chassis (drive components,
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 24, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      This is sort of a bizarre question. It goes out to anyone with
      knowledge of Marklin's 88836 DRG class 52. Is that the same 2-10-0
      chassis (drive components, etc) that is used on for the 81360
      snowplow set? I am thinking of modeling a PRR Decapod (2-10-0), but
      it would be easier to steal the drive mechanism from another loco. I
      would need a loco about as long as a Mikado, so the one from the
      snowplow set is much too small. I doubt that Marklin would make many
      different class 2-10-0s, so right now, it's just a dream. Thanks.
      Dan
    • Bahls@t-online.de
      Hello Dan, your question is not that bizarre! Indeed all the 2-10-0s and the 2-10-2 tank loco use the same chassis. If you want to build a PRR L1 or L1s, you
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 25, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello Dan,

        your question is not that bizarre!

        Indeed all the 2-10-0s and the 2-10-2 tank loco use the same chassis. If you
        want to build a PRR L1 or L1s, you will have to face some compromises as the
        wheel diameter. The Z 52's wheel diameter is 6 mm; whilst your L1 has 62", which
        makes 7,16 mm. The next bigger Z wheel diameter from the 24 or 41 would be far
        better suited, as it has 7 mm - but it does not fit into the chassis due to
        several reasons.
        As well it would lead to nothing "lengthening" a 24 or 41 chassis, because your
        L1 has 22'8" wheelbase, which is 31,3 mm in Z scale. The 41 wheelbase,
        lengthened to five axles would come out at 37 mm.

        I think a fine solution would be to "shrink" the loco shell (which you will want
        to build yourself) to match the overall proportions.

        Hope that helps. I wish you success!

        Cheers,

        Michael

        the steamlocospeZialist


        dpstripe schrieb:
        > This is sort of a bizarre question. It goes out to anyone with
        > knowledge of Marklin's 88836 DRG class 52. Is that the same 2-10-0
        > chassis (drive components, etc) that is used on for the 81360
        > snowplow set? I am thinking of modeling a PRR Decapod (2-10-0), but
        > it would be easier to steal the drive mechanism from another loco. I
        > would need a loco about as long as a Mikado, so the one from the
        > snowplow set is much too small. I doubt that Marklin would make many
        > different class 2-10-0s, so right now, it's just a dream. Thanks.
        > Dan
      • dpstripe
        Michael, Thanks for the information. I figured that that would be the direction that I would have to go. I just figured it wouldn t hurt to ask. My first
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 25, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          Michael,
          Thanks for the information. I figured that that would be the
          direction that I would have to go. I just figured it wouldn't hurt to
          ask. My first thought was to add an "undriven" set of wheels on the
          back of a Mikado and just make new push rods. But, as you know, there
          isn't enough room to put the axle through without trashing the motor.
          Thanks again for the information. Looks like I'll be making a decapod
          junior.
          Dan
          --- In z_scale@y..., Bahls@t... wrote:
          > Hello Dan,
          >
          > your question is not that bizarre!
          >
          > Indeed all the 2-10-0s and the 2-10-2 tank loco use the same
          chassis. If you
          > want to build a PRR L1 or L1s, you will have to face some
          compromises as the
          > wheel diameter. The Z 52's wheel diameter is 6 mm; whilst your L1
          has 62", which
          > makes 7,16 mm. The next bigger Z wheel diameter from the 24 or 41
          would be far
          > better suited, as it has 7 mm - but it does not fit into the
          chassis due to
          > several reasons.
          > As well it would lead to nothing "lengthening" a 24 or 41 chassis,
          because your
          > L1 has 22'8" wheelbase, which is 31,3 mm in Z scale. The 41
          wheelbase,
          > lengthened to five axles would come out at 37 mm.
          >
          > I think a fine solution would be to "shrink" the loco shell (which
          you will want
          > to build yourself) to match the overall proportions.
          >
          > Hope that helps. I wish you success!
          >
          > Cheers,
          >
          > Michael
          >
          > the steamlocospeZialist
          >
          >
          > dpstripe schrieb:
          > > This is sort of a bizarre question. It goes out to anyone with
          > > knowledge of Marklin's 88836 DRG class 52. Is that the same 2-10-
          0
          > > chassis (drive components, etc) that is used on for the 81360
          > > snowplow set? I am thinking of modeling a PRR Decapod (2-10-0),
          but
          > > it would be easier to steal the drive mechanism from another
          loco. I
          > > would need a loco about as long as a Mikado, so the one from the
          > > snowplow set is much too small. I doubt that Marklin would make
          many
          > > different class 2-10-0s, so right now, it's just a dream. Thanks.
          > > Dan
        • jfaust_42
          I m testing a recently-purchased Marklin 2-10-0 (with tender), #88121. It s been giving some trouble in operation, so I oiled the gears a bit, checked for
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 13, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            I'm testing a recently-purchased Marklin 2-10-0 (with tender), #88121. It's been giving some trouble in operation, so I oiled the gears a bit, checked for debris in the drivetrain (none found), and put power to it.

            Based on experience with my N scale locomotives, I would have expected a current draw of maybe 200mA or so. At 6 volts, I was measuring more like 400mA. Is that a reasonable current draw for a loco like this?

            Thanks.

            --Jeff
          • BAZ
            That s too high, but I ve seen it several times before. If it is not binding, then the brushes may be worn too far or misaligned (there is a sweet spot and its
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 13, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              That's too high, but I've seen it several times before. If it is not binding, then the brushes may be worn too far or misaligned (there is a sweet spot and its not easy to change). Or, the commutator is full of crud.

              You need to get the motor out of the chassis, generally easy to do.


              Jeff

              Sent 'from the road'

              On Nov 13, 2013, at 7:14 PM, <jfaust42@...> wrote:

               

              I'm testing a recently-purchased Marklin 2-10-0 (with tender), #88121. It's been giving some trouble in operation, so I oiled the gears a bit, checked for debris in the drivetrain (none found), and put power to it.

              Based on experience with my N scale locomotives, I would have expected a current draw of maybe 200mA or so. At 6 volts, I was measuring more like 400mA. Is that a reasonable current draw for a loco like this?

              Thanks.

              --Jeff

            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.