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cork roadbed how thick?

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  • malleus12345
    I ve been experimenting with an old piece of cork sheet that s about 1/4 thick, practicing cutting it to size to lay under track. Now that I ve got the
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 1, 2002
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      I've been experimenting with an old piece of cork sheet that's
      about 1/4" thick, practicing cutting it to size to lay under
      track. Now that I've got the technique down, let me just
      double-check: is about 1/4" thick the right thickness for
      roadbed?

      Thank you all.

      John Strawn, S Systems Inc., 15 Willow Larkspur CA 94939 USA
      tel +1 (415) 927 8856 http://www.s-systems-inc.com
      email jstrawn@...
    • Reynard Wellman
      Hello John, Put some Z scale track on top of it and see if you like it. I use 1/16 (.062) thick cork for roadbed and I like the way it looks. Maybe along super
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 2, 2002
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        Hello John,

        Put some Z scale track on top of it and see if you like it.
        I use 1/16"(.062) thick cork for roadbed and I like the way it looks.
        Maybe along super high speed ROWs would I consider
        1/8" thick cork for roadbed.

        Regards,
        Reynard

        malleus12345 wrote:

        > I've been experimenting with an old piece of cork sheet that's
        > about 1/4" thick, practicing cutting it to size to lay under
        > track. Now that I've got the technique down, let me just
        > double-check: is about 1/4" thick the right thickness for
        > roadbed?
        >
        > Thank you all.
        >
        > John Strawn, S Systems Inc., 15 Willow Larkspur CA 94939 USA
        > tel +1 (415) 927 8856 http://www.s-systems-inc.com
        > email jstrawn@...
        >
      • zscalehobo
        I ll agree with Reynard: 1/16 is a good thickness. The Merkur roadbed (distributed by Noch) is that thick and looks good. zscalehobo ... looks.
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 2, 2002
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          I'll agree with Reynard: 1/16" is a good
          thickness. The Merkur roadbed (distributed
          by Noch) is that thick and looks good.

          zscalehobo

          --- In z_scale@y..., Reynard Wellman <micron@m...> wrote:
          > Hello John,
          >
          > Put some Z scale track on top of it and see if you like it.
          > I use 1/16"(.062) thick cork for roadbed and I like the way it
          looks.
          > Maybe along super high speed ROWs would I consider
          > 1/8" thick cork for roadbed.
          >
          > Regards,
          > Reynard
          >
          > malleus12345 wrote:
          >
          > > I've been experimenting with an old piece of cork sheet that's
          > > about 1/4" thick, practicing cutting it to size to lay under
          > > track. Now that I've got the technique down, let me just
          > > double-check: is about 1/4" thick the right thickness for
          > > roadbed?
          > >
          > > Thank you all.
          > >
          > > John Strawn, S Systems Inc., 15 Willow Larkspur CA 94939 USA
          > > tel +1 (415) 927 8856 http://www.s-systems-inc.com
          > > email jstrawn@s...
        • jmac_han
          ... USA ... Hi John, Roadbed elevation varied enormously on prototype railroads depending on their practice and the type of drainage required. On our Z
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 2, 2002
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            --- In z_scale@y..., "malleus12345" <zscale@s...> wrote:
            > I've been experimenting with an old piece of cork sheet that's
            > about 1/4" thick, practicing cutting it to size to lay under
            > track. Now that I've got the technique down, let me just
            > double-check: is about 1/4" thick the right thickness for
            > roadbed?
            >
            > Thank you all.
            >
            > John Strawn, S Systems Inc., 15 Willow Larkspur CA 94939
            USA
            > tel +1 (415) 927 8856 http://www.s-systems-inc.com
            > email jstrawn@s...

            Hi John,

            Roadbed elevation varied enormously on prototype railroads
            depending on their practice and the type of drainage required.

            On our Z empires, the height of the rails from the ground is a
            matter of taste as far as I'm concerned. If you want to keep
            everything level, you can put cork over the area that will serve as
            your base. You can carve ditches and other depressions into the
            cork along side the track right of way.

            Since you are going to ballast the track no doubt ;-) you can
            always use ground cover and scenery materials up against the
            cork to reduce the illusion of height and produce a more natural
            incline.

            Have fun with whatever you do. And remember, there is almost
            always a prototype for everything in model railroading, whether
            we know it or not! :-)

            Jeffrey MacHan
          • rohirrim98236
            ... I, too, have used 1/4 cork for my road bed. It was left over from installing a cork floor in my home. It s easy to cut, and though it has a higher than
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 3, 2002
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              --- In z_scale@y..., "malleus12345" <zscale@s...> wrote:
              > I've been experimenting with an old piece of cork sheet that's
              > about 1/4" thick,

              I, too, have used 1/4" cork for my road bed. It was left over from installing a cork floor in my home.

              It's easy to cut, and though it has a higher than usual profile, it will allow me the chance to use the extra depth on the sides of the
              road bed for scenic transitions, ditches, a stream, etc. The use of scenary elements is a bit more flexible, and it will hide the fact
              that the road bed profile is somewhat off the norm.

              As another said in reply: if it looks good to you, then it's fine.

              E.L.F.
            • digistevez
              Hi, today I looked at 1/16 cork w/rubber binder that is very flexible and with balast I m hoping will do better than the N scale road bed I cut down. I am
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 5, 2002
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                Hi, today I looked at 1/16" cork w/rubber binder that is very
                flexible and with balast I'm hoping will do better than the N scale
                road bed I cut down. I am having gaskets made for a seperate project
                and picked up the samples there at shop in 1/8" & 1/16". I will try
                and get rough video pic if interested.
                Steve
              • Reynard Wellman
                Hello Steve, If you have a Michael s Art Supply store in your area you can find rolls of 1/16 cork in their frames department. These sheets are probably meant
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 6, 2002
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                  Hello Steve,

                  If you have a Michael's Art Supply store in your area you can find rolls
                  of 1/16" cork in their frames department. These sheets are probably
                  meant for providing a nice matt around pictures because they are about
                  18" x 36". I obtained a 45° matt knife in the same store. This knife is
                  used with a steel straight edge to cut the outside bevel for the
                  roadbed. One sheet will give you at least 36' to 40' of wonderful
                  looking roadbed.

                  Just a tip, Zeds have all kinds of great ways to provide the roadbed for
                  their layouts and yes, I also use1/8" and 1/4" thick cork that can be
                  used to fill in for different grades along rolling hills. But the 1/16"
                  looks great along the flat sections and the rail yards.

                  regardz,
                  Reynard
                  digistevez wrote:

                  > Hi, today I looked at 1/16" cork w/rubber binder that is very
                  > flexible and with balast I'm hoping will do better than the N scale
                  > road bed I cut down. I am having gaskets made for a seperate project
                  > and picked up the samples there at shop in 1/8" & 1/16". I will try
                  > and get rough video pic if interested.
                  > Steve
                  >
                  >
                  > "Z" WARNING! HANDLE WITH CARE! Highly addictive in Small DoseZ!
                  >
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • malleus12345
                  Today I ve been experimenting with ballasting on 1/4 cork using the excellent suggestions by Jeffrey MacHan on the VECRR group. If you have been using 1/4
                  Message 8 of 9 , Mar 10, 2002
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                    Today I've been experimenting with ballasting on 1/4" cork
                    using the excellent suggestions by Jeffrey MacHan on
                    the VECRR group. If you have been using 1/4" cork, and
                    you have been ballasting, then what tricks do you use to
                    pile up the ballast on the side of the cork? I ask because
                    in my first attempts, I can easily spread the ballast along
                    the rails as Jeffrey describes, but the ballast usually
                    falls off the sides of the cork.

                    Do you cut an
                    especially gentle slope from the edges of the ties down
                    to the plywood? Do you apply ballast in 2 or 3 layers
                    on the side of the cork?

                    Anyone else have tips on ballast on the sides of the cork?

                    Thank you.

                    John Strawn, S Systems Inc., 15 Willow Larkspur CA 94939 USA
                    tel +1 (415) 927 8856 http://www.s-systems-inc.com
                    email jstrawn@...

                    --- In z_scale@y..., "rohirrim98236" <rohirrim@w...> wrote:
                    > --- In z_scale@y..., "malleus12345" <zscale@s...> wrote:
                    > > I've been experimenting with an old piece of cork sheet that's
                    > > about 1/4" thick,
                    >
                    > I, too, have used 1/4" cork for my road bed. It was left over from
                    installing a cork floor in my home.
                    >
                    > It's easy to cut, and though it has a higher than usual profile, it
                    will allow me the chance to use the extra depth on the sides of the
                    > road bed for scenic transitions, ditches, a stream, etc. The use of
                    scenary elements is a bit more flexible, and it will hide the fact
                    > that the road bed profile is somewhat off the norm.
                    >
                    > As another said in reply: if it looks good to you, then it's fine.
                    >
                    > E.L.F.
                  • ztrack@aol.com
                    John, I buy cork in rolls. I then use a pair of scissors to cut the cork into strips. I actually lay the track section on the cork to create a pattern. When
                    Message 9 of 9 , Mar 11, 2002
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                      John,

                      I buy cork in rolls. I then use a pair of scissors to cut the cork into
                      strips. I actually lay the track section on the cork to create a pattern.
                      When cutting with scissors, I cut at an angle so the cork is beveled. I then
                      use straight white glue and run a bead along the side of the track. With a
                      brush, I then push the glue into the ties and even out the glue along the
                      beveled cork edge. I try not to thin the glue out too much, electing to leave
                      a fair amount to really adhere the ballast. I thin sprinkle the ballast on.

                      I then ballast the inside of the rail by filling the ties with ballast. I
                      then use 50/50 white glue and water (with a drop of dish washing liquid) to
                      cover all the ballast. I then spray the track section lightly with water.
                      After this all dries, apply the 50/50 mix again to the inside of the rail and
                      mist.

                      Vacuum up loose ballast and touch up were needed.

                      Rob Kluz

                      Ztrack Magazine, Ltd.
                      6142 Northcliff Blvd.
                      Dublin, OH 43016
                      Phone/Fax (614) 764-1703
                      www.ztrack.com
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