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z scale layouts

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  • m383350@aol.com
    I am returning to the list and to z scale, I have had a Marklin set for a couple of years and looked at it twice. I had intended to make a coffee table
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 28 1:35 PM
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      I am returning to the list and to z scale, I have had a Marklin set for a couple of years and looked at it twice. I had intended to make a coffee table layout at some point. I now have decided that the tight cell insulating foam is the thing to use for a light weight layout, the stuff that comes in 4 x 8 sheets in Home Depot. (designer pink or blue!) Paint will fix that and some scenery! I have an N scale layout using this and it it great and light weight! Plus it can be stacked and shaped easily also. Anybody else used this for their basis on which to start?

      Mitch
    • ztrack@aol.com
      Mitch, Yes, I used the pink and blue foam and love it! I find it easy to shape, very strong, yet lightweight. Great stuff. I use a Stanley Surfoam rasp to
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 1, 2002
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        Mitch,

        Yes, I used the pink and blue foam and love it! I find it easy to shape, very
        strong, yet lightweight. Great stuff. I use a Stanley Surfoam rasp to shape
        it. I fill in spots with Sculptamold or Celluclay (preference, Celluclay). I
        simply use Carpenters glue to hold it all in place.

        Rob Kluz

        Ztrack Magazine, Ltd.
        6142 Northcliff Blvd.
        Dublin, OH 43016
        Phone/Fax (614) 764-1703
        www.ztrack.com
      • David George
        I use the builder foam as the base for my module layouts.I double up on the layers of foam and then I frame them with marine grade 3/8 inch plywood ( cut 3 1/2
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 3, 2002
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          I use the builder foam as the base for my module layouts.I double up on
          the layers of foam and then I frame them with marine grade 3/8 inch
          plywood ( cut 3 1/2 inches wide to length, then block glued & skrewed at
          corners).
          I then cover the foam with a layer of 3/16 inch cork sheeting , bought
          from my local lumber yard. This comes in 36inch wide rolls which the yard
          will cut to any length. The cork -on-foam system provides me with a better
          overall surface on which to paint,add scenic foam,construct plaster cloth
          forms,etc., while adding another sound softening surface. It might be
          considered overkill of cork ,,but it works for me.
          David G.

          --- m383350@... wrote:
          > I am returning to the list and to z scale, I have had a Marklin set for
          > a couple of years and looked at it twice. I had intended to make a
          > coffee table layout at some point. I now have decided that the tight
          > cell insulating foam is the thing to use for a light weight layout, the
          > stuff that comes in 4 x 8 sheets in Home Depot. (designer pink or blue!)
          > Paint will fix that and some scenery! I have an N scale layout using
          > this and it it great and light weight! Plus it can be stacked and
          > shaped easily also. Anybody else used this for their basis on which to
          > start?
          >
          > Mitch
          >


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