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Re: Shasta Layout in Continental Modeller March Issue

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  • Malcolm Kent Cleaveland
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 4 11:24 AM



      On Thu Apr 3, 2014 3:31 am (PDT) flyerbait

      Not sure if anyone mentioned anything, but i did pick up the March issue of Continental Modeller (www.pecopublicatio ns.co.uk) Has a decent sized article on Kevin Smith's "Shasta" layout (8 pages). Good to see U.S style Z getting a mention. For those of you Unfamilar with the magazine, its published by Peco (who make track, including Z flex track, I find its good for tunnels, and hidden yards, use the microtrains flex for visiable runs). Since U.S magazines have gone up in shipping (and shipping out of the U.S for models has gone up 2-3 times as much this year, huge jump) I buy this one now and again. Makes me hope that they might consider developing switches as well. I used to use their N scale track a lot and its very good quality, if they got into other Z track other than the flex... well one can hope.
      Leigh

      I agree that Peco Z flex is quite useful, but mostly in places where it cannot be seen because the tie spacing is European, not U.S. standard.  If they were to manufacture Z switches, the ties would have the same European tie spacing.  Same problem with the Rokuhan switches, which are very reliable and have the advantage over the Marklin and Micro-Trains (MTL) switches of having the switch machine buried in the roadbed. If only MTL would make longer flex (it measures just over 12").  I believe this is a holdover from a time when MTL could not conceive of anyone wanting a layout larger than a briefcase.  That's the only reason I can think of why their flex is so short.  Of course, a 10 piece package of MTL flex retails for about $40, so that is about $4/foot.  Pretty pricey. 
      CheerZ,
        -- Malcolm Z
      MCZ Models

       wrote:
    • de Champeaux Dominique
      Just ordered that issue as well. Dom ________________________________ De : Malcolm Kent Cleaveland À : Z_scale@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 4 11:34 AM
        Just ordered that issue as well.
        Dom





        De : Malcolm Kent Cleaveland <mcleavel@...>
        À : "Z_scale@yahoogroups.com" <Z_scale@yahoogroups.com>
        Envoyé le : Vendredi 4 avril 2014 20h24
        Objet : [Z_Scale] Re: Shasta Layout in Continental Modeller March Issue

         



        On Thu Apr 3, 2014 3:31 am (PDT) flyerbait

        Not sure if anyone mentioned anything, but i did pick up the March issue of Continental Modeller (www.pecopublicatio ns.co.uk) Has a decent sized article on Kevin Smith's "Shasta" layout (8 pages). Good to see U.S style Z getting a mention. For those of you Unfamilar with the magazine, its published by Peco (who make track, including Z flex track, I find its good for tunnels, and hidden yards, use the microtrains flex for visiable runs). Since U.S magazines have gone up in shipping (and shipping out of the U.S for models has gone up 2-3 times as much this year, huge jump) I buy this one now and again. Makes me hope that they might consider developing switches as well. I used to use their N scale track a lot and its very good quality, if they got into other Z track other than the flex... well one can hope.
        Leigh

        I


      • flyerbait
        I got to be honest, the Rokuhan switches really do look toylike. The other thing that bothers me is that Japanese Z makers pretty much went to 12 volt..
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 5 5:40 AM


          I got to be honest, the Rokuhan switches  really do look toylike. The other thing that bothers me is that Japanese Z makers pretty much went to 12 volt.. instead of staying the standard 8-10volt. yes, peco is slightly larger in rail size than the Mircotrains, and definately noticable in spacing (though if you have time on your side and a razor saw, you can easily modify tie spacing). I do think, with enough anoying Peco could produce a "u.s" style flex and points, they already produce H.O. U.S specific track. I have been watching quite a few modelers in the U.S swop out their old Atlas switches for Peco ones. I have made my own N scale switches myself when i was a teenager (out of flex track rail) because of their costs and availability. Its looking like I might likely start doing that in this scale as well. we will see. I have been using heavily modified Marklin turnouts, but i have noticed that they don't like all locos, and will short out momentarily now and again, even with marklin engines!

          Peco also produces an N scale manual turntable (thats modifiable to a z version) I picked up a kit a while back and its been put away for a later project. I did create a single manual turntable using the smaller earphone plug method, it did work fairly well with the 0-5-0 shunter, but it would be quite painful if you were using it with multiple tracks and stalls, one false move and crunch.

        • garthah
          The only Japanese Z scale maker who went to 12vdc was Tokyo Mauri a.k.a. Pro-Z. The rest are all 10vdc, Crown a.k.a. PRMLoco, Akia a.k.a. Plus Up, Eisen
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 5 8:33 AM
            The only Japanese Z scale maker who went to 12vdc was Tokyo Mauri  a.k.a. Pro-Z. The rest are all 10vdc, Crown a.k.a. PRMLoco,  Akia a.k.a. Plus Up, Eisen Platz, Craft, and Rokuhan  Tenshodo uses Rokuhan Track and controllers in their starter sets. 

            As to the track everything in Japan has the same tie spacing and it is copied from Marklin, Crown makes roadbed track and Eisen Platz makes a limited amount of  tie based track as did Pro-Z,

             For someone who was in N for many years and always used flex from Micro Engineering and their turnouts  and Ntrak modules, roadbed track does seem toy like, but my experience at train shows has shown me the public want to see trains run, and are not interested or even notice what track they are running on,and quickly melt away if you have derailments due  to your track work,mainly caused by the track we insert between modules but stay routed to the display when things run well and continue to run, so, my experience is that roadbed track, with expansion track across module joints using T=track modules on table tops has allowed a greater number of modelers to get their trains out to shows and enchant the public whether it is N or Z or HO,  Yes it is a step away from the old and tried methods but trains do run better on roadbed track even if it just laid out on a table top,  I find the young  who just coming to the hobby stay with it longer when started on Roadbed track and t-trak modules than when started with snap track and standard 2x4 ft modules. So the difference is do you run trains at train shows or are you a fine scale modeler, you can be both one at shows and the other at home

            .A at table top height youngsters can see the trains without a stool or a parent picking them up, and I am also at their level when talking to them, not towering over them siting on a stool or standing over them.   

            So while you may knock roadbed track it has a place in the hobby just maybe not your place. 

            cheerz Garth
          • Lee Barry
            in reply to your track mail. When I was in N scale from 1997 to 2005/6 I used Kato roadbed type track.I looked pretty realistic and as you said IT WORKED W/O
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 5 12:09 PM
              in reply to your track mail. When I was in N scale from 1997 to 2005/6 I used Kato roadbed type track.I looked pretty realistic and as you said "IT WORKED W/O DERAILMENTS" and that is what people who view a small size, not a club sized weekly meeting layout want to see anyway. Most are not interested in "switching operations,real type railroading sized down to the scale you are using. In Nov,2010 when I took my layout, Z scale 37x27x10 layout, it is basically a "runner" to the Bluefield,Va./W.Va. train show there was an older man there who had N scale stuff and a layout who could not "keep" his hands off of it, worse than a youngin and he kept having derailments after derailments. I told my wife to watch my layout while I was going over there to see if I could help him. My wife said while I was gone there was this older lady pushing a larger sized boy in a "wheel chair". He kept taking his hand and putting it on my layout, and asking his grandmother, "what is this". She said "don't touch it is these peoples train layout". She told my wife he had only about 15-25% of his sight left and by that time the next year,he would be totally blind. I am sorry I was not there to see him. Just think how lucky we are. Yhe problem with my grandsons sight over the last few weeks really scared my wife and I, but the doctors siad it was what they call "Alice In Wonderland Syndrome". Again I thank FT Dewey for sending us to info about this eye problem. Lee & Ann Barry, CEO L"Z"PMRR.
                 ps: if I had a way to transport my layout to the Cleveland,Oh. show in July I'd enter it in the show. So far right now I am planning on attending the show. Want to meet the people who I have conversed with over the last almost 18-20 yrs.


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