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Re: Happy camper with 16 car AZL heavyweight train and a question

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  • mark2playz
    Bill, I like your story the best. The trains you re thinking of are UP s City. They had the City of LA, City of SF, City of Portland(Portland Rose) City of
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 28 7:05 PM
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      Bill,
      I like your story the best.
      The trains you're thinking of are UP's City. They had the City of LA, City of SF, City of Portland(Portland Rose) City of Denver and I believe a city on the Wabash line. Originally, separate trains, but by the 60s it was just one physical "City to Everywhere" train.
      I rode on the City of Denver. It was merge from with the City of LA at Ogden and split off for Denver in Cheyenne. The operations were a bit more complex than adding to the end as Denver cars, both chair and sleepers, came from both SF & LA and possibly even Portland. SP from Oakland was famous for missing the Ogden connection.

      Mark


      --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Billhko" <billhko@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Sorry about that. I am getting old.
      >
      > During the steam era, passenger trains were made up so that the first class passengers were spared the sounds and soot from the locomotive. Baggage cars, express freight and mail cars were 1st behind the locomotive. Then came the chair cars. These were the cheap seats. After the chair cars came the kitchen and then the dining cars. The cheap seat passengers had to walk past the kitchen in order to reach the dining car. The far end of the dining car had a porter who prevented the chair car passengers from going into the 1st class section of the train. Heaven forbid if a 1st class passenger had to walk past the kitchen to go to the diner or if a cheap seat passenger should ever enter the world of the 1st class passenger. If you were a cheap seat passenger you could never go back to see the view from the observation car. Some chair cars converted into sleepers. I don't know where these were placed. Probably in front of the kitchen car. The more that you paid the further you were seated from the locomotive.
      >
      > Some trains left Chicago with two different destinations. One destination was Denver and the the other was the West Coast. I don't remember which RR. The part of the train that went to Denver was stuck on behind the regular train so that some cheap seats were behind the Pullman cars going on to the west coast. I don't remember where they divided the train into two. Maybe this happened during the last days of passenger service before Amtrak.
      >
      > There were no transcontinental RRs. RRs traveled West from New York and ended at Chicago or other parts along the Mississippi River. Different RRs went from Chicago to the West Coast. The SP never did reach any East Coast RRs except maybe in the South. The Pullman company provided passenger cars that traveled from coast to coast so that the wealthy could stay in the same car all the way across the country. The Pullman Company did not have locomotives or have any track. They just piggybacked on other RR trains.
      >
      > To answer Greg's question, he could just follow the idea that the passenger cars occupied by the coach passengers were close to the dirty, smelly, noisy locomotive. That the low-brow and high-brow were divided by the dinning car with the kitchen closer to the locomotive. Other than that, he would have to decide on a specific RR and try to find and duplicate one of their consists. The consists changed depending on traffic. Winter, shorter trains, Summer longer trains.
      >
      > I took the Amtrak "Starlight" from LA to Seattle. The roomettes were behind the head end cars. Then the lounge car and the kitchen and dining car. The cheap seats were behind the dining car. Back in the late '40s I rode the all reserved coach overnighter "The Trail Blazer" from NYC to Chicago. This was the businessman's special. It left the East coast behind a GG1. It arrived in Chicago behind a diesel. It was one of the Pennsylvania RR's premier trains. At 6 in the morning, traveling through Ohio in a blizzard, hardly any heat reached the observation car. Since it was all coach there was no restriction on the "poor" sitting in the observation car. I was the only one back there. Breathing would create fog. One attendant came by occasionally to check to see if I hadn't froze.
      >
      > Hope that this helps. I also hope that I am still coherent.
      >
      > Bill
      >
      >
      > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Greg Elmassian" <greg@> wrote:
      > >
      > > The "Don" brought my goodies by my birthday party. I'm running a 16 car Santa Fe heavyweight train. Hoo boy! It sure looks good, although I know a few more cars need to be made.
      > >
      > > Now my question is what is the typical or close to prototype order of these cars?
      > >
      > > (I know that not all cars were always in the same train, but looking for some logical order)
      > >
      > > 71628-1 | Baggage 3 & 5 window | 1686
      > > 71628-2 | Baggage 3 & 5 window | 1772
      > >
      > > 71028-1 | 12-1 Sleeper | Red Mill
      > > 71028-2 | 12-1 Sleeper | Red Oak
      > > 71128-1 | 10-1-2 Sleeper | Swan Lake
      > > 71128-2 | 10-1-2 Sleeper | Moose Lake
      > >
      > > 71428-1 | 28-1 Parlor | 3231
      > > 71428-2 | 28-1 Parlor | 3232
      > >
      > > 71528-1 | 36 Set Diner | 1404
      > > 71528-2 | 36 Set Diner | 1467
      > >
      > > 71228-1 | 8-1-2 Sleeper | Centshire
      > > 71228-2 | 8-1-2 Sleeper | Centlawn
      > >
      > > 71328-1 | 6-3 Sleeper | Glen Forge
      > > 71328-1 | 6-3 Sleeper | Glen Ewen
      > >
      > > 71728-1 Paired Window Coach 1247
      > > 71728-2 Paired Window Coach 1266
      > >
      > > Greg
      > >
      >
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