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Re: Happy camper with 16 car AZL heavyweight train and a question

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  • amtk908
    Hi Greg, It would be a somewhat unusual consist to operate them all together in one train. As a single train using one of each car type the general order
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 27 6:25 PM
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      Hi Greg,

      It would be a somewhat unusual consist to operate them all together in one train. As a single train using one of each car type the general order would be...

      Baggage
      Coach
      Parlor
      Diner
      Sleeper 6-3
      Sleeper 8-1-2
      Sleeper 10-1-2
      Sleeper 12-1

      The cars with the greater number of private rooms were generally placed closer to the diner. Likewise with parlor space as opposed to coaches (on the Santa Fe coaches were called chair cars.)

      If you want to use them all in one train, double the cars in the above order. Use thee first baggage car for storage mail and the second baggage car for passenger checked baggage and express. Use the diner adjacent to the parlors as the diner for coach passengers and the diner adjacent to the sleepers for the first class sleeping car passengers. Run the first diner kitchen end trailing and the second diner table end trailing. That keeps the kitchen ends of the diners together and makes it easier for the crew to keep the coach and parlor passengers out of the first class diner and sleepers. Remember, in the heavyweight era, trains were definitely class divided; coach class and first class. Parlor cars were generally considered first class however they were inferior to sleepers, even section sleepers.

      Of course, it is your railroad, you can line-em-up any way you like.

      Enjoy,
      Cliff



      --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Greg Elmassian" <greg@...> wrote:
      >
      > Actually did that, was hoping for some better data..
      >
      > This is what I have amassed so far:
      >
      > http://elmassian.com/trains/santa-fe-prototype-info/passenger-car-roster
      >
      > Greg
      >
      > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <jim29t@> wrote:
      > >
      > > There are numerous sources for describing a consist. Train consists varied from named train to named train and along the route. For example Google Santa Fe Super Chief consist and you will find it was all pullman sleeper. Try it. Jim
      > >
      > > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Greg Elmassian" <greg@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > The "Don" brought my goodies by my birthday party. I'm running a 16 car Santa Fe heavyweight train. Hoo boy! It sure looks good, although I know a few more cars need to be made.
      > > >
      > > > Now my question is what is the typical or close to prototype order of these cars?
      > > >
      > > > (I know that not all cars were always in the same train, but looking for some logical order)
      > > >
      > > > 71628-1 | Baggage 3 & 5 window | 1686
      > > > 71628-2 | Baggage 3 & 5 window | 1772
      > > >
      > > > 71028-1 | 12-1 Sleeper | Red Mill
      > > > 71028-2 | 12-1 Sleeper | Red Oak
      > > > 71128-1 | 10-1-2 Sleeper | Swan Lake
      > > > 71128-2 | 10-1-2 Sleeper | Moose Lake
      > > >
      > > > 71428-1 | 28-1 Parlor | 3231
      > > > 71428-2 | 28-1 Parlor | 3232
      > > >
      > > > 71528-1 | 36 Set Diner | 1404
      > > > 71528-2 | 36 Set Diner | 1467
      > > >
      > > > 71228-1 | 8-1-2 Sleeper | Centshire
      > > > 71228-2 | 8-1-2 Sleeper | Centlawn
      > > >
      > > > 71328-1 | 6-3 Sleeper | Glen Forge
      > > > 71328-1 | 6-3 Sleeper | Glen Ewen
      > > >
      > > > 71728-1 Paired Window Coach 1247
      > > > 71728-2 Paired Window Coach 1266
      > > >
      > > > Greg
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • amtk908
      Hi Greg, It would be a somewhat unusual consist to operate them all together in one train. As a single train using one of each car type the general order
      Message 2 of 13 , Aug 27 6:32 PM
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        Hi Greg,

        It would be a somewhat unusual consist to operate them all together in one train. As a single train using one of each car type the general order would be...

        Baggage
        Coach
        Parlor
        Diner
        Sleeper 6-3
        Sleeper 8-1-2
        Sleeper 10-1-2
        Sleeper 12-1

        The cars with the greater number of private rooms were generally placed closer to the diner. Likewise with parlor space as opposed to coaches (on the Santa Fe coaches were called chair cars.)

        If you want to use them all in one train, double the cars in the above order. Use thee first baggage car for storage mail and the second baggage car for passenger checked baggage and express. Use the diner adjacent to the parlors as the diner for coach passengers and the diner adjacent to the sleepers for the first class sleeping car passengers. Run the first diner kitchen end trailing and the second diner table end trailing. That keeps the kitchen ends of the diners together and makes it easier for the crew to keep the coach and parlor passengers out of the first class diner and sleepers. Remember, in the heavyweight era, trains were definitely class divided; coach class and first class. Parlor cars were generally considered first class however they were inferior to sleepers, even section sleepers.

        Of course, it is your railroad, you can line-em-up any way you like.

        Enjoy,
        Cliff



        --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Greg Elmassian" <greg@...> wrote:
        >
        > Actually did that, was hoping for some better data..
        >
        > This is what I have amassed so far:
        >
        > http://elmassian.com/trains/santa-fe-prototype-info/passenger-car-roster
        >
        > Greg
        >
        > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <jim29t@> wrote:
        > >
        > > There are numerous sources for describing a consist. Train consists varied from named train to named train and along the route. For example Google Santa Fe Super Chief consist and you will find it was all pullman sleeper. Try it. Jim
        > >
        > > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Greg Elmassian" <greg@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > The "Don" brought my goodies by my birthday party. I'm running a 16 car Santa Fe heavyweight train. Hoo boy! It sure looks good, although I know a few more cars need to be made.
        > > >
        > > > Now my question is what is the typical or close to prototype order of these cars?
        > > >
        > > > (I know that not all cars were always in the same train, but looking for some logical order)
        > > >
        > > > 71628-1 | Baggage 3 & 5 window | 1686
        > > > 71628-2 | Baggage 3 & 5 window | 1772
        > > >
        > > > 71028-1 | 12-1 Sleeper | Red Mill
        > > > 71028-2 | 12-1 Sleeper | Red Oak
        > > > 71128-1 | 10-1-2 Sleeper | Swan Lake
        > > > 71128-2 | 10-1-2 Sleeper | Moose Lake
        > > >
        > > > 71428-1 | 28-1 Parlor | 3231
        > > > 71428-2 | 28-1 Parlor | 3232
        > > >
        > > > 71528-1 | 36 Set Diner | 1404
        > > > 71528-2 | 36 Set Diner | 1467
        > > >
        > > > 71228-1 | 8-1-2 Sleeper | Centshire
        > > > 71228-2 | 8-1-2 Sleeper | Centlawn
        > > >
        > > > 71328-1 | 6-3 Sleeper | Glen Forge
        > > > 71328-1 | 6-3 Sleeper | Glen Ewen
        > > >
        > > > 71728-1 Paired Window Coach 1247
        > > > 71728-2 Paired Window Coach 1266
        > > >
        > > > Greg
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • mark2playz
        Greg, You ve got a lot more on your site than just consists. You might want to check out the Pullmanproject.com site if you haven t already. While I wouldn t
        Message 3 of 13 , Aug 27 11:20 PM
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          Greg,
          You've got a lot more on your site than just consists. You might want to check out the Pullmanproject.com site if you haven't already.

          While I wouldn't consider myself a Pullman expert this thread represents what I've found in my research: a lot of confliciting data. I've gotten to the point that I want at least 2 sources, and preferably images, before I believe. While I won't disagree with Cliff, I've seen the order of car types in reverse order of private rooms as well as the low room count cars like the 12-1 ahead of the diner. The justification given in that source was to minimize the amount of foot traffic through the private room cars. Take your pick for your favorite story.

          Mark
          --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "amtk908" <amtk908@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > Hi Greg,
          >
          > It would be a somewhat unusual consist to operate them all together in one train. As a single train using one of each car type the general order would be...
          >
          > Baggage
          > Coach
          > Parlor
          > Diner
          > Sleeper 6-3
          > Sleeper 8-1-2
          > Sleeper 10-1-2
          > Sleeper 12-1
          >
          > The cars with the greater number of private rooms were generally placed closer to the diner. Likewise with parlor space as opposed to coaches (on the Santa Fe coaches were called chair cars.)
          >
          > If you want to use them all in one train, double the cars in the above order. Use thee first baggage car for storage mail and the second baggage car for passenger checked baggage and express. Use the diner adjacent to the parlors as the diner for coach passengers and the diner adjacent to the sleepers for the first class sleeping car passengers. Run the first diner kitchen end trailing and the second diner table end trailing. That keeps the kitchen ends of the diners together and makes it easier for the crew to keep the coach and parlor passengers out of the first class diner and sleepers. Remember, in the heavyweight era, trains were definitely class divided; coach class and first class. Parlor cars were generally considered first class however they were inferior to sleepers, even section sleepers.
          >
          > Of course, it is your railroad, you can line-em-up any way you like.
          >
          > Enjoy,
          > Cliff
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Greg Elmassian" <greg@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Actually did that, was hoping for some better data..
          > >
          > > This is what I have amassed so far:
          > >
          > > http://elmassian.com/trains/santa-fe-prototype-info/passenger-car-roster
          > >
          > > Greg
          > >
          > > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <jim29t@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > There are numerous sources for describing a consist. Train consists varied from named train to named train and along the route. For example Google Santa Fe Super Chief consist and you will find it was all pullman sleeper. Try it. Jim
          > > >
          > > > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Greg Elmassian" <greg@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > The "Don" brought my goodies by my birthday party. I'm running a 16 car Santa Fe heavyweight train. Hoo boy! It sure looks good, although I know a few more cars need to be made.
          > > > >
          > > > > Now my question is what is the typical or close to prototype order of these cars?
          > > > >
          > > > > (I know that not all cars were always in the same train, but looking for some logical order)
          > > > >
          > > > > 71628-1 | Baggage 3 & 5 window | 1686
          > > > > 71628-2 | Baggage 3 & 5 window | 1772
          > > > >
          > > > > 71028-1 | 12-1 Sleeper | Red Mill
          > > > > 71028-2 | 12-1 Sleeper | Red Oak
          > > > > 71128-1 | 10-1-2 Sleeper | Swan Lake
          > > > > 71128-2 | 10-1-2 Sleeper | Moose Lake
          > > > >
          > > > > 71428-1 | 28-1 Parlor | 3231
          > > > > 71428-2 | 28-1 Parlor | 3232
          > > > >
          > > > > 71528-1 | 36 Set Diner | 1404
          > > > > 71528-2 | 36 Set Diner | 1467
          > > > >
          > > > > 71228-1 | 8-1-2 Sleeper | Centshire
          > > > > 71228-2 | 8-1-2 Sleeper | Centlawn
          > > > >
          > > > > 71328-1 | 6-3 Sleeper | Glen Forge
          > > > > 71328-1 | 6-3 Sleeper | Glen Ewen
          > > > >
          > > > > 71728-1 Paired Window Coach 1247
          > > > > 71728-2 Paired Window Coach 1266
          > > > >
          > > > > Greg
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • Billhko
          Sorry about that. I am getting old. During the steam era, passenger trains were made up so that the first class passengers were spared the sounds and soot
          Message 4 of 13 , Aug 28 12:29 PM
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            Sorry about that. I am getting old.

            During the steam era, passenger trains were made up so that the first class passengers were spared the sounds and soot from the locomotive. Baggage cars, express freight and mail cars were 1st behind the locomotive. Then came the chair cars. These were the cheap seats. After the chair cars came the kitchen and then the dining cars. The cheap seat passengers had to walk past the kitchen in order to reach the dining car. The far end of the dining car had a porter who prevented the chair car passengers from going into the 1st class section of the train. Heaven forbid if a 1st class passenger had to walk past the kitchen to go to the diner or if a cheap seat passenger should ever enter the world of the 1st class passenger. If you were a cheap seat passenger you could never go back to see the view from the observation car. Some chair cars converted into sleepers. I don't know where these were placed. Probably in front of the kitchen car. The more that you paid the further you were seated from the locomotive.

            Some trains left Chicago with two different destinations. One destination was Denver and the the other was the West Coast. I don't remember which RR. The part of the train that went to Denver was stuck on behind the regular train so that some cheap seats were behind the Pullman cars going on to the west coast. I don't remember where they divided the train into two. Maybe this happened during the last days of passenger service before Amtrak.

            There were no transcontinental RRs. RRs traveled West from New York and ended at Chicago or other parts along the Mississippi River. Different RRs went from Chicago to the West Coast. The SP never did reach any East Coast RRs except maybe in the South. The Pullman company provided passenger cars that traveled from coast to coast so that the wealthy could stay in the same car all the way across the country. The Pullman Company did not have locomotives or have any track. They just piggybacked on other RR trains.

            To answer Greg's question, he could just follow the idea that the passenger cars occupied by the coach passengers were close to the dirty, smelly, noisy locomotive. That the low-brow and high-brow were divided by the dinning car with the kitchen closer to the locomotive. Other than that, he would have to decide on a specific RR and try to find and duplicate one of their consists. The consists changed depending on traffic. Winter, shorter trains, Summer longer trains.

            I took the Amtrak "Starlight" from LA to Seattle. The roomettes were behind the head end cars. Then the lounge car and the kitchen and dining car. The cheap seats were behind the dining car. Back in the late '40s I rode the all reserved coach overnighter "The Trail Blazer" from NYC to Chicago. This was the businessman's special. It left the East coast behind a GG1. It arrived in Chicago behind a diesel. It was one of the Pennsylvania RR's premier trains. At 6 in the morning, traveling through Ohio in a blizzard, hardly any heat reached the observation car. Since it was all coach there was no restriction on the "poor" sitting in the observation car. I was the only one back there. Breathing would create fog. One attendant came by occasionally to check to see if I hadn't froze.

            Hope that this helps. I also hope that I am still coherent.

            Bill


            --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Greg Elmassian" <greg@...> wrote:
            >
            > The "Don" brought my goodies by my birthday party. I'm running a 16 car Santa Fe heavyweight train. Hoo boy! It sure looks good, although I know a few more cars need to be made.
            >
            > Now my question is what is the typical or close to prototype order of these cars?
            >
            > (I know that not all cars were always in the same train, but looking for some logical order)
            >
            > 71628-1 | Baggage 3 & 5 window | 1686
            > 71628-2 | Baggage 3 & 5 window | 1772
            >
            > 71028-1 | 12-1 Sleeper | Red Mill
            > 71028-2 | 12-1 Sleeper | Red Oak
            > 71128-1 | 10-1-2 Sleeper | Swan Lake
            > 71128-2 | 10-1-2 Sleeper | Moose Lake
            >
            > 71428-1 | 28-1 Parlor | 3231
            > 71428-2 | 28-1 Parlor | 3232
            >
            > 71528-1 | 36 Set Diner | 1404
            > 71528-2 | 36 Set Diner | 1467
            >
            > 71228-1 | 8-1-2 Sleeper | Centshire
            > 71228-2 | 8-1-2 Sleeper | Centlawn
            >
            > 71328-1 | 6-3 Sleeper | Glen Forge
            > 71328-1 | 6-3 Sleeper | Glen Ewen
            >
            > 71728-1 Paired Window Coach 1247
            > 71728-2 Paired Window Coach 1266
            >
            > Greg
            >
          • amtk908
            Greg, Mark makes an excellent point. Each railroad and often times, each train on each railroad had a consist order that made sense for that train. Another
            Message 5 of 13 , Aug 28 3:03 PM
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              Greg,
              Mark makes an excellent point. Each railroad and often times, each train on each railroad had a consist order that made sense for that train. Another thing to consider is cars that that would be set-out or picked-up en-route. They were often positioned in the consist to make for an "easy" move and so as to disturb the fewest number of passenger while handling the cars. regardless, you have plenty of cars to build and interesting consist.
              Enjoy!
              Cliff


              --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "mark2playz" <mark.markham@...> wrote:
              >
              > Greg,
              > You've got a lot more on your site than just consists. You might want to check out the Pullmanproject.com site if you haven't already.
              >
              > While I wouldn't consider myself a Pullman expert this thread represents what I've found in my research: a lot of confliciting data. I've gotten to the point that I want at least 2 sources, and preferably images, before I believe. While I won't disagree with Cliff, I've seen the order of car types in reverse order of private rooms as well as the low room count cars like the 12-1 ahead of the diner. The justification given in that source was to minimize the amount of foot traffic through the private room cars. Take your pick for your favorite story.
              >
              > Mark
              > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "amtk908" <amtk908@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Hi Greg,
              > >
              > > It would be a somewhat unusual consist to operate them all together in one train. As a single train using one of each car type the general order would be...
              > >
              > > Baggage
              > > Coach
              > > Parlor
              > > Diner
              > > Sleeper 6-3
              > > Sleeper 8-1-2
              > > Sleeper 10-1-2
              > > Sleeper 12-1
              > >
              > > The cars with the greater number of private rooms were generally placed closer to the diner. Likewise with parlor space as opposed to coaches (on the Santa Fe coaches were called chair cars.)
              > >
              > > If you want to use them all in one train, double the cars in the above order. Use thee first baggage car for storage mail and the second baggage car for passenger checked baggage and express. Use the diner adjacent to the parlors as the diner for coach passengers and the diner adjacent to the sleepers for the first class sleeping car passengers. Run the first diner kitchen end trailing and the second diner table end trailing. That keeps the kitchen ends of the diners together and makes it easier for the crew to keep the coach and parlor passengers out of the first class diner and sleepers. Remember, in the heavyweight era, trains were definitely class divided; coach class and first class. Parlor cars were generally considered first class however they were inferior to sleepers, even section sleepers.
              > >
              > > Of course, it is your railroad, you can line-em-up any way you like.
              > >
              > > Enjoy,
              > > Cliff
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Greg Elmassian" <greg@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Actually did that, was hoping for some better data..
              > > >
              > > > This is what I have amassed so far:
              > > >
              > > > http://elmassian.com/trains/santa-fe-prototype-info/passenger-car-roster
              > > >
              > > > Greg
              > > >
              > > > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <jim29t@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > There are numerous sources for describing a consist. Train consists varied from named train to named train and along the route. For example Google Santa Fe Super Chief consist and you will find it was all pullman sleeper. Try it. Jim
              > > > >
              > > > > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Greg Elmassian" <greg@> wrote:
              > > > > >
              > > > > > The "Don" brought my goodies by my birthday party. I'm running a 16 car Santa Fe heavyweight train. Hoo boy! It sure looks good, although I know a few more cars need to be made.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Now my question is what is the typical or close to prototype order of these cars?
              > > > > >
              > > > > > (I know that not all cars were always in the same train, but looking for some logical order)
              > > > > >
              > > > > > 71628-1 | Baggage 3 & 5 window | 1686
              > > > > > 71628-2 | Baggage 3 & 5 window | 1772
              > > > > >
              > > > > > 71028-1 | 12-1 Sleeper | Red Mill
              > > > > > 71028-2 | 12-1 Sleeper | Red Oak
              > > > > > 71128-1 | 10-1-2 Sleeper | Swan Lake
              > > > > > 71128-2 | 10-1-2 Sleeper | Moose Lake
              > > > > >
              > > > > > 71428-1 | 28-1 Parlor | 3231
              > > > > > 71428-2 | 28-1 Parlor | 3232
              > > > > >
              > > > > > 71528-1 | 36 Set Diner | 1404
              > > > > > 71528-2 | 36 Set Diner | 1467
              > > > > >
              > > > > > 71228-1 | 8-1-2 Sleeper | Centshire
              > > > > > 71228-2 | 8-1-2 Sleeper | Centlawn
              > > > > >
              > > > > > 71328-1 | 6-3 Sleeper | Glen Forge
              > > > > > 71328-1 | 6-3 Sleeper | Glen Ewen
              > > > > >
              > > > > > 71728-1 Paired Window Coach 1247
              > > > > > 71728-2 Paired Window Coach 1266
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Greg
              > > > > >
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • mark2playz
              Bill, I like your story the best. The trains you re thinking of are UP s City. They had the City of LA, City of SF, City of Portland(Portland Rose) City of
              Message 6 of 13 , Aug 28 7:05 PM
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                Bill,
                I like your story the best.
                The trains you're thinking of are UP's City. They had the City of LA, City of SF, City of Portland(Portland Rose) City of Denver and I believe a city on the Wabash line. Originally, separate trains, but by the 60s it was just one physical "City to Everywhere" train.
                I rode on the City of Denver. It was merge from with the City of LA at Ogden and split off for Denver in Cheyenne. The operations were a bit more complex than adding to the end as Denver cars, both chair and sleepers, came from both SF & LA and possibly even Portland. SP from Oakland was famous for missing the Ogden connection.

                Mark


                --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Billhko" <billhko@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Sorry about that. I am getting old.
                >
                > During the steam era, passenger trains were made up so that the first class passengers were spared the sounds and soot from the locomotive. Baggage cars, express freight and mail cars were 1st behind the locomotive. Then came the chair cars. These were the cheap seats. After the chair cars came the kitchen and then the dining cars. The cheap seat passengers had to walk past the kitchen in order to reach the dining car. The far end of the dining car had a porter who prevented the chair car passengers from going into the 1st class section of the train. Heaven forbid if a 1st class passenger had to walk past the kitchen to go to the diner or if a cheap seat passenger should ever enter the world of the 1st class passenger. If you were a cheap seat passenger you could never go back to see the view from the observation car. Some chair cars converted into sleepers. I don't know where these were placed. Probably in front of the kitchen car. The more that you paid the further you were seated from the locomotive.
                >
                > Some trains left Chicago with two different destinations. One destination was Denver and the the other was the West Coast. I don't remember which RR. The part of the train that went to Denver was stuck on behind the regular train so that some cheap seats were behind the Pullman cars going on to the west coast. I don't remember where they divided the train into two. Maybe this happened during the last days of passenger service before Amtrak.
                >
                > There were no transcontinental RRs. RRs traveled West from New York and ended at Chicago or other parts along the Mississippi River. Different RRs went from Chicago to the West Coast. The SP never did reach any East Coast RRs except maybe in the South. The Pullman company provided passenger cars that traveled from coast to coast so that the wealthy could stay in the same car all the way across the country. The Pullman Company did not have locomotives or have any track. They just piggybacked on other RR trains.
                >
                > To answer Greg's question, he could just follow the idea that the passenger cars occupied by the coach passengers were close to the dirty, smelly, noisy locomotive. That the low-brow and high-brow were divided by the dinning car with the kitchen closer to the locomotive. Other than that, he would have to decide on a specific RR and try to find and duplicate one of their consists. The consists changed depending on traffic. Winter, shorter trains, Summer longer trains.
                >
                > I took the Amtrak "Starlight" from LA to Seattle. The roomettes were behind the head end cars. Then the lounge car and the kitchen and dining car. The cheap seats were behind the dining car. Back in the late '40s I rode the all reserved coach overnighter "The Trail Blazer" from NYC to Chicago. This was the businessman's special. It left the East coast behind a GG1. It arrived in Chicago behind a diesel. It was one of the Pennsylvania RR's premier trains. At 6 in the morning, traveling through Ohio in a blizzard, hardly any heat reached the observation car. Since it was all coach there was no restriction on the "poor" sitting in the observation car. I was the only one back there. Breathing would create fog. One attendant came by occasionally to check to see if I hadn't froze.
                >
                > Hope that this helps. I also hope that I am still coherent.
                >
                > Bill
                >
                >
                > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Greg Elmassian" <greg@> wrote:
                > >
                > > The "Don" brought my goodies by my birthday party. I'm running a 16 car Santa Fe heavyweight train. Hoo boy! It sure looks good, although I know a few more cars need to be made.
                > >
                > > Now my question is what is the typical or close to prototype order of these cars?
                > >
                > > (I know that not all cars were always in the same train, but looking for some logical order)
                > >
                > > 71628-1 | Baggage 3 & 5 window | 1686
                > > 71628-2 | Baggage 3 & 5 window | 1772
                > >
                > > 71028-1 | 12-1 Sleeper | Red Mill
                > > 71028-2 | 12-1 Sleeper | Red Oak
                > > 71128-1 | 10-1-2 Sleeper | Swan Lake
                > > 71128-2 | 10-1-2 Sleeper | Moose Lake
                > >
                > > 71428-1 | 28-1 Parlor | 3231
                > > 71428-2 | 28-1 Parlor | 3232
                > >
                > > 71528-1 | 36 Set Diner | 1404
                > > 71528-2 | 36 Set Diner | 1467
                > >
                > > 71228-1 | 8-1-2 Sleeper | Centshire
                > > 71228-2 | 8-1-2 Sleeper | Centlawn
                > >
                > > 71328-1 | 6-3 Sleeper | Glen Forge
                > > 71328-1 | 6-3 Sleeper | Glen Ewen
                > >
                > > 71728-1 Paired Window Coach 1247
                > > 71728-2 Paired Window Coach 1266
                > >
                > > Greg
                > >
                >
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