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Re: Signals & Steam Loco Shells

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  • mark2playz
    Eric, Then you might want to check out a Model Railroader article from Feb 1986 on CMRI (computer interface). Not to sound like an advertisement, but you might
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 25, 2013
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      Eric,
      Then you might want to check out a Model Railroader article from Feb 1986 on CMRI (computer interface). Not to sound like an advertisement, but you might want to look into the MR DVD archive. The interface isn't great, but I've found that at some time or another all questions have been answered.
      For getting ballast colors, tie spacing and overall right of way characteristics, I found Google Earth to be very useful.
      Nothing wrong with being a bit of a perfectionist...just as long as it doesn't interfere with running the trains.

      Mark

      --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "proverbs30789" wrote:
      >
      > Thanks for the info everyone. Some good information.
      >
      > I was really hoping to find illustrations or pictures that show where and why certain signals/signs were placed at certain locations. I know that certain types and styles of signals were used on certain railroads but not others. I want to model a freelanced prototype layout but try to be correct in the mechanical and operational aspects. Trying to find out the colors of ballast used in what location (for GN, NP, SP&S and BN) has been difficult enough! : ) I'm too much of a perfectionist I guess.
      >
      > Second, Yeah, . . . I knew those 1K locos were out there but I will let the deeper pockets play with those. There is no way I could justify paying that much for a model train. If they halved the price I would be tempted. Too bad that other compnay went out of business. Anyone know how to get a hold of the casts for the shells? : ) I smell a business opportunity!
      >
      > Eric
      >
    • kelley wright
       IF you want to do a model railroad that is a freelance prototype , there are a few things to consider. Its great to do research on what type of ballast and
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 26, 2013
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         IF you want to do a model railroad that is a "freelance prototype" , there are a few things to consider.
        Its
        great to do research on what type of ballast and signals  was on the
        right of way, but before you get down in the weeds (literally) there are
        a few things to hash out first.
         I see that you mention steam and
        BN. What era do you plan on doing? If you are doing steam, is it going
        to be regular service or some special rail fan excursion? I am doing
        transitional era and trying to do it as close as I can get to the real
        railroad, but I will fudge it a few years here and there in order to run
        steam and keep the facilities (coal chutes, water tanks, ect) 
        Different RRs went diesel at different times, but pretty much between
        1950 and 1960 will put you in the ballpark.Try to get your rolling stock
        and engines
        to match the time period you want, Paint schemes, running boards,( or
        lack of ) types of caboose reflect the time period. If you are starting
        out find a time period and try to stick with it, otherwise you have a
        jumble of equipment that you spent money on, that you could use for
        something better that pops up. BN had no steam.
        You might want to do
        some research on the railroads you mentioned, see if they have
        historical societies that have data they could share. There are usually
        people in those societies that model too. I have gotten information such
        as track charts, that show what was used as ballast and when it was
        changed. Mine was cinders/slag and later parts were gravel, and as it is
        a coal route there would be coal and coal dust everywhere.
        Digging
        around you could see what kind of signals, or even if they used signals
        at all. I know signals are gee whiz and cool on a model layout but can
        get expensive very fast, and if they are really not
        needed, the money could be used for engines and rolling stock.
        The
        more you dig around and do research on the real railroads, the more fun
        it can be with your models. You dont have to be a rivet counter, but you
        can run a pretty good little railroad just as good as the HO and N guys
        in Z



         
        GVSTATVS SIMILIS PVLLVS !
        Kelley Wright

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