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Re: Set up question

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  • dr strangelove
    Hi All. I am working on building a little piece of the CB&Q, along the Beardstown to Paducah branch, plus or minus 1960. I am using Burlington Bulletin No 35,
    Message 1 of 13 , May 21, 2012
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      Hi All.
      I am working on building a little piece of the CB&Q, along the Beardstown to Paducah branch, plus or minus 1960.
      I am using Burlington Bulletin No 35, The Q in the Coalfields,by Mr John Mitchell, as a guide. I am researching the area I am from between Waltonville and Valier, Illinois.
      This book has several plans and a lot of pictures showing typical facilities along the line. There are examples of large facilities such as Centralia, and also the smaller facility at Herrin Junction.
      Using this information, as well as what I can find using Google Earth, as well as this sight
      http://www.isgs.uiuc.edu/nsdihome/webdocs/ilhap/county/
      I am piecing together where the water tanks and coal chutes were.
      I was very much surprised at seeing Fairbanks-Morse coal chutes not very far apart from one another, and in coal country. Water tanks were also very close together.
      A small junction facility like Herrin could easily be made, especially in Z scale. One does not need a big roundhouse or turntable.
      As more US steam engines are just around the corner, I am looking forward to seeing a few more transition era layouts, and hopefully the facilities to go with it.





      --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, Reynard Wellman <micron@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Alan,
      >
      > Your points are well taken. I'm just going on old
      > photos and I am not old enough to know exactly
      > what used to happen back in the 20s & 30s
      > or every detail of the "transition era".
      >
      > The mix-ups appear in the 40s & 50s.
      > Naturally, in a "transition era" yard most of the
      > steam stuff would be off along its own sidings.
      > Machine shop and foundry work would be
      > far removed from the fueling facilities
      > and the steam locomotive hot cinder
      > droppings are likely somewhere along the coal/water spur;
      > far away from the diesel fuel setup.
      > Yet both steam & diesel visited the same
      > sanding towers.
      >
      > Historically it took a while for diesel engines to
      > match the power of steam locomotives. So
      > the evolution away from steam took
      > about 20 years to complete. That would make for some
      > complicated, messy looking service yards ;>)
      >
      > Today our big US railroads and their equipment is
      > designed to handle freight, freight, freight. Gigantic diesels.
      > There is hardly any passenger train service available anymore,
      > and despite all this chatter about "high-speed rail" not
      > much ROW has ever been assigned for such service.
      > By waiting so long, we want to make sure it costs
      > ten times as much as it would have had we started
      > earlier.
      >
      > Reynard
      > http://www.micronart.com
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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