Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Question concerning structures & buildings

Expand Messages
  • David
    Hi, Does anyone know if there is a company that is, or may be, putting out Z-scale structures similar to those offered by Kato, Tomix/Tomytec, Greenmax, etc.,
    Message 1 of 20 , Jan 28, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi,

      Does anyone know if there is a company that is, or may be, putting out Z-scale structures similar to those offered by Kato, Tomix/Tomytec, Greenmax, etc., for N-scale? The current offerings are great, but I am looking to model a more modern scenario (but yet, the only Z-scale setup I have is an MTL UP F-7 loco & caboose, and a nice supply of rolling stock; go figure :-) ). I do have a CD that allows one to print modern-style buildings on cardstock, and then put them together, but I haven't tried it yet (I've moved three times in the last five years, so I haven't been trying much of anything for a while). You guys are always friendly and helpful; any information would most appreciated.

      Thanks,

      David P.
    • mark2playz
      David, You bring up an interesting question I hadn t given much thought about. If you are refering to modern ar being about 1980s and later, there isn t much I
      Message 2 of 20 , Jan 28, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        David,
        You bring up an interesting question I hadn't given much thought about. If you are refering to modern ar being about 1980s and later, there isn't much I can think of. Stonebridge models has a big box store. Kibri and a couple of other German sources have industrial buildings that could pass as modern. Nassen Street also has a couple of items. But overall I can think of much else that doesn't look like the sixties and earlier.

        Mark

        > Hi,
        >
        > Does anyone know if there is a company that is, or may be, putting out Z-scale structures similar to those offered by Kato, Tomix/Tomytec, Greenmax, etc., for N-scale? The current offerings are great, but I am looking to model a more modern scenario (but yet, the only Z-scale setup I have is an MTL UP F-7 loco & caboose, and a nice supply of rolling stock; go figure :-) ). I do have a CD that allows one to print modern-style buildings on cardstock, and then put them together, but I haven't tried it yet (I've moved three times in the last five years, so I haven't been trying much of anything for a while). You guys are always friendly and helpful; any information would most appreciated.
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > David P.
        >
      • Garth
        There are quite a few kit buidlings in laser cut wood. engineered plastic Check out the new town builder series here
        Message 3 of 20 , Jan 28, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          There are quite a few kit buidlings in laser cut wood. engineered plastic

          Check out the new town builder series here
          http://www.stonebridgemodels.com/index.htm?c=tbs
          then there is the line of laser cut wood kits from Stonebridge Models

          look Here
          http://www.stonebridgemodels.com/index.htm?c=z_struct

          There are etch brass kits from Micron Art

          http://www.micronart.com/

          laser curt wood from Micro Trains

          http://www.zscalemonster.com/mt/799-90-000/

          and GC laser
          http://www.zscalemonster.com/gclaser/


          Baz Bit and Robert Ray

          http://www.zscalemonster.com/robert-ray/

          more kits from from Miller engineering
          http://www.zscalemonster.com/miller_eng/miller_eng.htm

          this should get you started

          cheers Garth






          --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "David" <iplayfhorn@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi,
          >
          > Does anyone know if there is a company that is, or may be, putting out Z-scale structures similar to those offered by Kato, Tomix/Tomytec, Greenmax, etc., for N-scale? The current offerings are great, but I am looking to model a more modern scenario (but yet, the only Z-scale setup I have is an MTL UP F-7 loco & caboose, and a nice supply of rolling stock; go figure :-) ). I do have a CD that allows one to print modern-style buildings on cardstock, and then put them together, but I haven't tried it yet (I've moved three times in the last five years, so I haven't been trying much of anything for a while). You guys are always friendly and helpful; any information would most appreciated.
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > David P.
          >
        • David Mummery
          Hey Gang, Don t forget RS Laser Dave Mummery http://27squaresof220ing.blogspot.com/ http://tractionmadness.blogspot.com/ Sent from my U.S. Cellular
          Message 4 of 20 , Jan 28, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            Hey Gang,

            Don't forget RS Laser

            Dave Mummery

            http://27squaresof220ing.blogspot.com/
            http://tractionmadness.blogspot.com/

            Sent from my U.S. Cellular BlackBerry® smartphone

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Garth <garth.a.hamilton@...>
            Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2012 01:45:15
            To: <z_scale@yahoogroups.com>
            Subject: [Z_Scale] Re: Question concerning structures & buildings

             



            There are quite a few kit buidlings in laser cut wood. engineered plastic

            Check out the new town builder series here
            http://www.stonebridgemodels.com/index.htm?c=tbs
            then there is the line of laser cut wood kits from Stonebridge Models

            look Here
            http://www.stonebridgemodels.com/index.htm?c=z_struct

            There are etch brass kits from Micron Art

            http://www.micronart.com/

            laser curt wood from Micro Trains

            http://www.zscalemonster.com/mt/799-90-000/

            and GC laser
            http://www.zscalemonster.com/gclaser/

            Baz Bit and Robert Ray

            http://www.zscalemonster.com/robert-ray/

            more kits from from Miller engineering
            http://www.zscalemonster.com/miller_eng/miller_eng.htm

            this should get you started

            cheers Garth

            --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com <mailto:z_scale%40yahoogroups.com> , "David" <iplayfhorn@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi,
            >
            > Does anyone know if there is a company that is, or may be, putting out Z-scale structures similar to those offered by Kato, Tomix/Tomytec, Greenmax, etc., for N-scale? The current offerings are great, but I am looking to model a more modern scenario (but yet, the only Z-scale setup I have is an MTL UP F-7 loco & caboose, and a nice supply of rolling stock; go figure :-) ). I do have a CD that allows one to print modern-style buildings on cardstock, and then put them together, but I haven't tried it yet (I've moved three times in the last five years, so I haven't been trying much of anything for a while). You guys are always friendly and helpful; any information would most appreciated.
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            > David P.
            >
          • mark2playz
            All, I agree all these companies have a variety of fine products, but for the most part the last time their style could be called modern we were all watching
            Message 5 of 20 , Jan 28, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              All,
              I agree all these companies have a variety of fine products, but for the most part the last time their style could be called "modern" we were all watching black and white TV.

              Mark

              --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "David" <iplayfhorn@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi,
              >
              > Does anyone know if there is a company that is, or may be, putting out Z-scale structures similar to those offered by Kato, Tomix/Tomytec, Greenmax, etc., for N-scale? The current offerings are great, but I am looking to model a more modern scenario (but yet, the only Z-scale setup I have is an MTL UP F-7 loco & caboose, and a nice supply of rolling stock; go figure :-) ). I do have a CD that allows one to print modern-style buildings on cardstock, and then put them together, but I haven't tried it yet (I've moved three times in the last five years, so I haven't been trying much of anything for a while). You guys are always friendly and helpful; any information would most appreciated.
              >
              > Thanks,
              >
              > David P.
              >
            • David Mummery
              Yep, Though GC Laser might have the most modern, there s all ways scratch building. Dave Mummery http://27squaresof220ing.blogspot.com/
              Message 6 of 20 , Jan 28, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                Yep,
                Though GC Laser might have the most modern, there's all ways scratch building.

                Dave Mummery

                http://27squaresof220ing.blogspot.com/
                http://tractionmadness.blogspot.com/

                Sent from my U.S. Cellular BlackBerry® smartphone

                -----Original Message-----
                From: mark2playz <mark.markham@...>
                Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2012 01:59:40
                To: <z_scale@yahoogroups.com>
                Subject: [Z_Scale] Re: Question concerning structures & buildings

                 



                All,
                I agree all these companies have a variety of fine products, but for the most part the last time their style could be called "modern" we were all watching black and white TV.

                Mark

                --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com <mailto:z_scale%40yahoogroups.com> , "David" <iplayfhorn@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi,
                >
                > Does anyone know if there is a company that is, or may be, putting out Z-scale structures similar to those offered by Kato, Tomix/Tomytec, Greenmax, etc., for N-scale? The current offerings are great, but I am looking to model a more modern scenario (but yet, the only Z-scale setup I have is an MTL UP F-7 loco & caboose, and a nice supply of rolling stock; go figure :-) ). I do have a CD that allows one to print modern-style buildings on cardstock, and then put them together, but I haven't tried it yet (I've moved three times in the last five years, so I haven't been trying much of anything for a while). You guys are always friendly and helpful; any information would most appreciated.
                >
                > Thanks,
                >
                > David P.
                >
              • Michael
                Most truly modern downtown buildings are big glass boxes full of offices, so they should be fairly easy to model using sheets of clear styrene or similar with
                Message 7 of 20 , Jan 28, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  Most truly modern downtown buildings are big glass boxes full of offices, so they should be fairly easy to model using sheets of clear styrene or similar with stick-on window frames. The styrene should have a slight greenish tint to it to mimic the solar protection. Almost any internal structure you could think of will have a prototype somewhere, but the GCLaser building cores would do nicely for a relatively small building.

                  Cheers

                  --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "David" <iplayfhorn@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi,
                  >
                  > Does anyone know if there is a company that is, or may be, putting out Z-scale structures similar to those offered by Kato, <snip>
                  >
                • ztrack@aol.com
                  Luetke offers a number of buildings that are modern . While most of their line is European, I think some of their kits can easily pass for buildings here in
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jan 29, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Luetke offers a number of buildings that are 'modern'. While most of their
                    line is European, I think some of their kits can easily pass for buildings
                    here in the US. The terraced homes, and home construction site are two that
                    stand out.

                    http://www.ztrackcenter.com/luetke/residential/index.html

                    There gas station is another one that is very modern:

                    http://www.ztrackcenter.com/luetke/commercial_2/index.html

                    Also if you really want to go nuts, their hi-rise towers can fit into many
                    modern cities

                    Rob

                    Ztrack Magazine Ltd.
                    Distributor American Z Line
                    Authorized MTL, Full Throttle, Tenshodo
                    and Rokuhan dealer.
                    www.ztrack.com
                    www.ztrackcenter.com
                    www.ztrackresale.com
                    www.rokuhan-usa.com
                    6142 Northcliff Blvd
                    Dublin OH 43016
                    (614) 764-1703

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Alan Cox
                    On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 03:50:50 -0000 ... I find clear sheet very floppy even in small scales. Another good source is all the plastic clear packaging that stuff
                    Message 9 of 20 , Jan 29, 2012
                    • 0 Attachment
                      On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 03:50:50 -0000
                      "Michael" <ironduke@...> wrote:

                      > Most truly modern downtown buildings are big glass boxes full of offices, so they should be fairly easy to model using sheets of clear styrene or similar with stick-on window frames.

                      I find clear sheet very floppy even in small scales. Another good source
                      is all the plastic clear packaging that stuff turns up in. Often you can
                      find rigid containers that are interesting shapes including big rounded
                      ones.

                      For modern flat surfaces or those curved in one direction you can then
                      print the entire building surface onto printable vinyl and use a vinyl
                      cutter to cut the windows out.

                      Stuck onto the building you've got the shape and body albeit a bit flat.
                      Some pipework, a fire escape ladder or two and a bit of decorative
                      material will disguise that flatness very well (as do balconies).

                      Alan
                    • kelley wright
                      I might be a little biased because I live in a 3oo year old house and live across the way from one that is about 450 years old, but, What kind of building
                      Message 10 of 20 , Jan 29, 2012
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I might be a little biased because I live in a 3oo year old house and live across the way from one that is about 450 years old, but, What kind of building would you consider modern? You say you have F7s, and rolling stock and a caboose, so unless you have a tourist railroad you will be right at home between 1955 and latest 1975, depending on the railroad.
                        I have been places that had nothing but modern buildings but, if you look around most buildings have been around a while, but perhaps with modern signs and modifications. I have seen places in the bay area that has sprung up and all the buildings are no older than 10 years old but, realistically, unless you are modeling the Bart, railroad towns have very old buildings. 
                        You got to get a sense of history and model what the time period is. What belongs with what. A bunch of Europeans that like to model the USA had all these 1950s early 60s trains and autos and trucks, and in this old factory building down by the tracks the put up signs proclaiming it a shopping mall. I did not have the heart to tell them there were no such things back then, if it was a old factory it would STILL be an old factory in the 50s, or abandoned, even if they ran modern equipment there would be know way that an old factory along the track in the bad part of town would EVER be a shopping mall.
                        Anachronisms. 
                        GVSTATVS SIMILIS PVLLVS !
                        Kelley Wright

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • dr strangelove
                        Why not cut pieces of rigid plexiglas, glue it in a cube, use tape or plastic strips to make windows and the floors and a bit of find sandpaper for the roof.
                        Message 11 of 20 , Jan 29, 2012
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Why not cut pieces of rigid plexiglas, glue it in a cube, use tape or plastic strips to make windows and the floors and a bit of find sandpaper for the roof. Or like you say, use vinyl and cut the windows. You could use car window tinting and foil too on the inside. also add the details, AC and whatnot. Modern hirise using this method should be pretty cheap. Dont forget lights inside.


                          --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, Alan Cox <alan@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 03:50:50 -0000
                          > "Michael" <ironduke@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > > Most truly modern downtown buildings are big glass boxes full of offices, so they should be fairly easy to model using sheets of clear styrene or similar with stick-on window frames.
                          >
                          > I find clear sheet very floppy even in small scales. Another good source
                          > is all the plastic clear packaging that stuff turns up in. Often you can
                          > find rigid containers that are interesting shapes including big rounded
                          > ones.
                          >
                          > For modern flat surfaces or those curved in one direction you can then
                          > print the entire building surface onto printable vinyl and use a vinyl
                          > cutter to cut the windows out.
                          >
                          > Stuck onto the building you've got the shape and body albeit a bit flat.
                          > Some pipework, a fire escape ladder or two and a bit of decorative
                          > material will disguise that flatness very well (as do balconies).
                          >
                          > Alan
                          >
                        • Rick Saviano
                          Kelley, I once read a book on Le Corbusier, a famous architect. One of the photos showed a antique Ford parked near an ultra-modern building. Or so I
                          Message 12 of 20 , Jan 29, 2012
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Kelley,

                            I once read a book on Le Corbusier, a famous architect. One of the
                            photos showed a antique Ford parked near an ultra-modern building. Or
                            so I thought. The photo was taken in 1925. The Dana House in
                            Springfield, Illinois was one of Frank Lloyd Wright's first "remodeling"
                            contracts, doesn't look like a time-appropriate building. The
                            Farnsworth House, built as a vacation "glas und shteel" (Ludwig Mies Van
                            De Rohe) house in a small rural town about 60 miles from Chicago for a
                            prominent doctor in Chicago was built in the early 50's.

                            What I'm getting at is: anachronism is such a relative term, and I
                            learned that Z scalers shouldn't be rivet counters - it's hard enough to
                            find anything close to be appropriate for an era.

                            - Rick Saviano

                            ===============
                            Kelley Wright said:
                            "I might be a little biased because I live in a 3oo year old house and
                            live across the way from one that is about 450 years old,"
                          • dr strangelove
                            One does not have to be a rivet counter, but one should strive for at least a certain amount of reality in the hobby. There was an article in one of the
                            Message 13 of 20 , Jan 29, 2012
                            • 0 Attachment
                              One does not have to be a rivet counter, but one should strive for at least a certain amount of reality in the hobby. There was an article in one of the popular railroad magazines not long ago dealing with this subject. Some guy had built trestle bents upside down because he liked the way it looked. At the end of the day, it is you're railroad and only you have to be happy with it. If you want to run transition era diesel and steam engines around a layout with big box stores and fast food places, ala´Plasticville, more power to you. Want to run a German ICE through 1950s American scene, along with Japanese steam, go for it.
                              --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, Rick Saviano <saviano@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Kelley,
                              >
                              > I once read a book on Le Corbusier, a famous architect. One of the
                              > photos showed a antique Ford parked near an ultra-modern building. Or
                              > so I thought. The photo was taken in 1925. The Dana House in
                              > Springfield, Illinois was one of Frank Lloyd Wright's first "remodeling"
                              > contracts, doesn't look like a time-appropriate building. The
                              > Farnsworth House, built as a vacation "glas und shteel" (Ludwig Mies Van
                              > De Rohe) house in a small rural town about 60 miles from Chicago for a
                              > prominent doctor in Chicago was built in the early 50's.
                              >
                              > What I'm getting at is: anachronism is such a relative term, and I
                              > learned that Z scalers shouldn't be rivet counters - it's hard enough to
                              > find anything close to be appropriate for an era.
                              >
                              > - Rick Saviano
                              >
                              > ===============
                              > Kelley Wright said:
                              > "I might be a little biased because I live in a 3oo year old house and
                              > live across the way from one that is about 450 years old,"
                              >
                            • ismail arslangiray
                              It is an hobby. You said. So, anyone can do a layout with anything. So, who cares about the mismatch? This is not like restoring a 57 Chevy BelAir for
                              Message 14 of 20 , Jan 29, 2012
                              • 0 Attachment
                                It is an hobby. You said. So, anyone can do a layout with anything. So, who
                                cares about the mismatch? This is not like restoring a 57 Chevy BelAir for
                                Barrett-Jackson

                                On Sun, Jan 29, 2012 at 9:46 AM, dr strangelove <
                                kaiserwillieii0815@...> wrote:

                                > **
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > One does not have to be a rivet counter, but one should strive for at
                                > least a certain amount of reality in the hobby. There was an article in one
                                > of the popular railroad magazines not long ago dealing with this subject.
                                > Some guy had built trestle bents upside down because he liked the way it
                                > looked. At the end of the day, it is you're railroad and only you have to
                                > be happy with it. If you want to run transition era diesel and steam
                                > engines around a layout with big box stores and fast food places,
                                > ala�Plasticville, more power to you. Want to run a German ICE through 1950s
                                > American scene, along with Japanese steam, go for it.
                              • Michael
                                For modern glass towers, I ve used this successfully. Find a shape that you want the building to be (all dimensions), wood blocks work great. Seal it, then
                                Message 15 of 20 , Jan 30, 2012
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  For modern glass towers, I've used this successfully. Find a shape that you want the building to be (all dimensions), wood blocks work great. Seal it, then paint it the color that you want the building to be, silver or greenish work. Take a piece of the plastic that you can run thru a laser printer. Print a grid work (I use Excel) of the size you want the structure between the windows to be. Cut the plastic to shape and fold it around the wood block. Add rooftop details.
                                • David
                                  That sounds like a great idea. I had thought about making buildings out of balsa wood blocks at one time, but then realized that although my dad is a master
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Feb 1, 2012
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    That sounds like a great idea. I had thought about making buildings out of balsa wood blocks at one time, but then realized that although my dad is a master at building stuff, I evidently didn't get that gene. Had I tried it, my layout would look like something from PeeWee's Playhouse, or some other surreal TV show. What size blocks do you use?

                                    David P.

                                    --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Michael" <ghy9@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > For modern glass towers, I've used this successfully. Find a shape that you want the building to be (all dimensions), wood blocks work great. Seal it, then paint it the color that you want the building to be, silver or greenish work. Take a piece of the plastic that you can run thru a laser printer. Print a grid work (I use Excel) of the size you want the structure between the windows to be. Cut the plastic to shape and fold it around the wood block. Add rooftop details.
                                    >
                                  • dr strangelove
                                    Sure, and you can run a Thomas the Tank Engine around in a circle of Lego houses too. But don´t get mad when people laugh at you.
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Feb 2, 2012
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Sure, and you can run a Thomas the Tank Engine around in a circle of Lego houses too. But don´t get mad when people laugh at you.

                                      --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, ismail arslangiray <iarslangiray@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > It is an hobby. You said. So, anyone can do a layout with anything. So, who
                                      > cares about the mismatch? This is not like restoring a 57 Chevy BelAir for
                                      > Barrett-Jackson
                                      >
                                      > On Sun, Jan 29, 2012 at 9:46 AM, dr strangelove <
                                      > kaiserwillieii0815@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > > **
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > One does not have to be a rivet counter, but one should strive for at
                                      > > least a certain amount of reality in the hobby. There was an article in one
                                      > > of the popular railroad magazines not long ago dealing with this subject.
                                      > > Some guy had built trestle bents upside down because he liked the way it
                                      > > looked. At the end of the day, it is you're railroad and only you have to
                                      > > be happy with it. If you want to run transition era diesel and steam
                                      > > engines around a layout with big box stores and fast food places,
                                      > > ala´Plasticville, more power to you. Want to run a German ICE through 1950s
                                      > > American scene, along with Japanese steam, go for it.
                                      >
                                    • Kevin Brady
                                      Hi all, not really: http://www.nelug.org/index.php?page=2 Best,Kev On Thu, Feb 2, 2012 at 7:02 AM, dr strangelove
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Feb 2, 2012
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        Hi all,

                                        not really: http://www.nelug.org/index.php?page=2

                                        Best,Kev

                                        On Thu, Feb 2, 2012 at 7:02 AM, dr strangelove <kaiserwillieii0815@...
                                        > wrote:

                                        > **
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Sure, and you can run a Thomas the Tank Engine around in a circle of Lego
                                        > houses too. But don�t get mad when people laugh at you.
                                        >
                                        > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, ismail arslangiray <iarslangiray@...>
                                        > wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > It is an hobby. You said. So, anyone can do a layout with anything. So,
                                        > who
                                        > > cares about the mismatch? This is not like restoring a 57 Chevy BelAir
                                        > for
                                        > > Barrett-Jackson
                                        > >
                                        > > On Sun, Jan 29, 2012 at 9:46 AM, dr strangelove <
                                        > > kaiserwillieii0815@...> wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > > **
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > > One does not have to be a rivet counter, but one should strive for at
                                        > > > least a certain amount of reality in the hobby. There was an article
                                        > in one
                                        > > > of the popular railroad magazines not long ago dealing with this
                                        > subject.
                                        > > > Some guy had built trestle bents upside down because he liked the way
                                        > it
                                        > > > looked. At the end of the day, it is you're railroad and only you have
                                        > to
                                        > > > be happy with it. If you want to run transition era diesel and steam
                                        > > > engines around a layout with big box stores and fast food places,
                                        > > > ala�Plasticville, more power to you. Want to run a German ICE through
                                        > 1950s
                                        > > > American scene, along with Japanese steam, go for it.
                                        > >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >



                                        --
                                        Dr. Dirt's Weathering Service


                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • flyerbait
                                        ... Heh. I used to wonder about that as well, both my brother and myself can out scratch build our father and grandfather when it comes to model trains, both
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Feb 2, 2012
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "David" <iplayfhorn@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > That sounds like a great idea. I had thought about making buildings out of balsa wood blocks at one time, but then realized that although my dad is a master at building stuff, I evidently didn't get that gene.

                                          Heh. I used to wonder about that as well, both my brother and myself can out scratch build our father and grandfather when it comes to model trains, both of us were building our own buildings and kits (because of a lack of money to get kits or materials) before we hit double digits. We caught the train bug off them, and I believe because of our interest and drive and lack of cash turned us both into pretty fair modelers.. that and the constant raiding of the collections of stuff the old's had gathered ;)

                                          But I would suggest that you start simple. Join a club who has a club layout that still is in need of buildings, senery items, etc, in a larger scale like N, H.O or O and work with several other experienced model builders building stuff for the club layout. Then take what you learn home and do it for your own. I did my first building out of balsa wood, card and paper and PVA (white) glue, with an old single blade disposable razor blade, a pencil and a wooden school ruler.. lolz painted it up with watered down house paint and colour pencils, no idea what happened to it, but i was damn proud of it, eventually it got binned when i realized how out of scale it was, and badly made. but so what, thats how we learn.

                                          You dont need a lot of stuff to practice. If you have a printer, i suggest u jump on line and google up some free card models, print them out on 220 gsm card, in what ever scale u find them, reinforce them and glue them up. Do a bunch of them, then take a look at the first one, then the 10th one u do and look at the huge difference in your skill level in just a short time. Then give them away, then find the few that are around in 1:200 and 1:220 for free (yeah there are a few around), and make them up. Then repaint them. doesn't mater if u ruin it, you can always print out another and do it again. Then, try combining several of them into a single building. Americanize the euro buildings, Euro the american ones. The most expensive thing u are going to use is the printer ink. Packs of 200-250 gsm card (thickness of the card) in A4 size is cheap in packs of 50 or 100. Glue with Superglue or PVA, even glue sticks, paing with cheap acrilics, detail with fine tip pens and pencils. spray with a cheap finish mat varnish.

                                          If u got young relitives, like nephews who play with die cast cars or HO trains or military or 40K gaming im sure they would love some card buildings with garages to park them in, and no harm done if they end up breaking or destroying them. all the time you build up your skills fast and cheaply. why not just print one out now in paper, glue it to the back of some card from a cereal box, trim it up ? :)

                                          Lee
                                        • Michael
                                          When scratch building large buildings, I size them based on the MARKLIN five story apartment building that is 3.5x3x3 inches (LWH). I ve also printed out a few
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Feb 3, 2012
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            When scratch building large buildings, I size them based on the MARKLIN five story apartment building that is 3.5x3x3 inches (LWH).

                                            I've also printed out a few buildings. Some things I do to "make them better" is; spray lightly with Dullcote, then put a drop of gloss varnish on each widow, add a chimney and a couple of vent pipes; if it has vegetation on it, I paint it with glue and add suitably colored ground cover. In some cases, I've glued fine grit sandpaper to the top to give it a textured roof.
                                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.