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Re: Gapping Rokuhan Track

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  • david.davidksmith
    Alan, either way, I have not found any official terminology describing the corresponding parts on a model switch. I do like the idea of frog legs, though.
    Message 1 of 36 , Jul 28, 2011
      Alan, either way, I have not found any "official" terminology describing the corresponding parts on a model switch. I do like the idea of "frog legs," though. Well played.

      Regards,
      David

      http://davidksmith.com/modeling.htm

      --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, Alan Cox <alan@...> wrote:
      >
      > on 7/28/11 9:04 AM, david.davidksmith at david@... wrote:
      > > > Greg, part of the problem I suspect is that, in the real world, there are no
      > > > "short rails after the frog."
      >
      > It depends on the construction. If it has a cast frog (common in the US
      > for low speed industrial sidings) then the frog ends with two joints to
      > the rails proper and there is no short rail.
      >
      > If the frog is made from the rails (higher speeds etc) then the rails are
      > usually joined shortly after the vee so that there is an expansion gap
      > between the main rails and the v rail so the tension of the long lengths
      > of welded rail doesn't end up on the V itself, and also for practical
      > maintainance reasons.
      >
      > This is the case even on modern high speed welded rail
      >
      > Alan
      >
    • david.davidksmith
      Alan, either way, I have not found any official terminology describing the corresponding parts on a model switch. I do like the idea of frog legs, though.
      Message 36 of 36 , Jul 28, 2011
        Alan, either way, I have not found any "official" terminology describing the corresponding parts on a model switch. I do like the idea of "frog legs," though. Well played.

        Regards,
        David

        http://davidksmith.com/modeling.htm

        --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, Alan Cox <alan@...> wrote:
        >
        > on 7/28/11 9:04 AM, david.davidksmith at david@... wrote:
        > > > Greg, part of the problem I suspect is that, in the real world, there are no
        > > > "short rails after the frog."
        >
        > It depends on the construction. If it has a cast frog (common in the US
        > for low speed industrial sidings) then the frog ends with two joints to
        > the rails proper and there is no short rail.
        >
        > If the frog is made from the rails (higher speeds etc) then the rails are
        > usually joined shortly after the vee so that there is an expansion gap
        > between the main rails and the v rail so the tension of the long lengths
        > of welded rail doesn't end up on the V itself, and also for practical
        > maintainance reasons.
        >
        > This is the case even on modern high speed welded rail
        >
        > Alan
        >
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