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Re: Paint scheme

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  • mark2playz
    Dan, Thanks for the info. To editorialize, prior to Aluminum paint (about 1935-1940 from what I can find) the firebox would be black and after about that time
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 7, 2011
      Dan,
      Thanks for the info. To editorialize, prior to Aluminum paint (about 1935-1940 from what I can find) the firebox would be black and after about that time it could be aluminum depending on the road.

      ark

      --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, dpstripe@... wrote:
      >
      >
      > Mark,
      > The "front of the boiler" is actually the smokebox. The boiler of a locomotive was very well insulated to prevent the loss of heat (and expensive steam). The smokebox, however, was not insulated. The smokebox would get very hot and cause paint to blister. It was generally covered with either an oil and graphite mix or else other high temp coatings like aluminum paint. This is a fairly generic explanation, but it gives the general idea.
      > Dan S.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: mark2playz <mark.markham@...>
      > To: Z_Scale@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Mon, Feb 7, 2011 3:07 pm
      > Subject: [Z_Scale] Paint scheme
      >
      >
      > Hi,
      > I'm customizing a Marklin Mikado. The prototype I'm copying from ran with the
      > ront of the boiler painted silver, like the Marklin scheme and at other times
      > ust painted black. I was wondering if anyone knew why they would paint the
      > ront silver? The scheme seems to be independent of road, or even if the front
      > f the boiler faces back.
      > Mark
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      > Z-scale: minimum siZe, MAXIMUM enjoyment!
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      > Individual Email | Traditional
      > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Alan Cox
      On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 04:10:35 -0000 ... It may be worth taking a good look at photos. In the UK they were always black, but the black was often subtly different
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 8, 2011
        On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 04:10:35 -0000
        "mark2playz" <mark.markham@...> wrote:

        > Dan,
        > Thanks for the info. To editorialize, prior to Aluminum paint (about 1935-1940 from what I can find) the firebox would be black and after about that time it could be aluminum depending on the road.

        It may be worth taking a good look at photos. In the UK they were always
        black, but the black was often subtly different (more matt) than the
        rest, which can be a nice detail to pick out.

        Alan
      • dpstripe@aol.com
        Going back to at least 1929, the Pennsy s smokebox paint (or front end paint) was a heat resistant black graphite paint with aluminum powder mixed in. (12.5
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 8, 2011
          Going back to at least 1929, the Pennsy's smokebox paint (or front end paint) was a heat resistant black graphite paint with aluminum powder mixed in. (12.5 pounds of aluminum powder per 50 gallons of paint, to be exact). The color was a silvery black that is hard to see in many black and white photos. But, in color pictures/slides of the 50s, it can be seen very clearly, and under some lighting conditions, it almost looks silver. From what I have found, the graphite paint or oil and graphite mixtures were both fairly common early on and I'm fairly certain that the aluminum powder wasn't unique to the Pennsy.

          Dan S.






          -----Original Message-----
          From: mark2playz <mark.markham@...>
          To: z_scale@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Mon, Feb 7, 2011 11:10 pm
          Subject: [Z_Scale] Re: Paint scheme


          Dan,
          Thanks for the info. To editorialize, prior to Aluminum paint (about
          935-1940 from what I can find) the firebox would be black and after about that
          ime it could be aluminum depending on the road.
          ark
          --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, dpstripe@... wrote:


          Mark,
          The "front of the boiler" is actually the smokebox. The boiler of a locomotive
          as very well insulated to prevent the loss of heat (and expensive steam). The
          mokebox, however, was not insulated. The smokebox would get very hot and cause
          aint to blister. It was generally covered with either an oil and graphite mix
          r else other high temp coatings like aluminum paint. This is a fairly generic
          xplanation, but it gives the general idea.
          Dan S.





          -----Original Message-----
          From: mark2playz <mark.markham@...>
          To: Z_Scale@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Mon, Feb 7, 2011 3:07 pm
          Subject: [Z_Scale] Paint scheme


          Hi,
          I'm customizing a Marklin Mikado. The prototype I'm copying from ran with
          he
          ront of the boiler painted silver, like the Marklin scheme and at other times
          ust painted black. I was wondering if anyone knew why they would paint the
          ront silver? The scheme seems to be independent of road, or even if the front
          f the boiler faces back.
          Mark

          ------------------------------------
          Z-scale: minimum siZe, MAXIMUM enjoyment!
          ahoo! Groups Links
          Individual Email | Traditional
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          -----------------------------------
          Z-scale: minimum siZe, MAXIMUM enjoyment!
          ahoo! Groups Links
          Individual Email | Traditional
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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