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Z scale stores

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  • y.draiggoch
    Hello All, When I get online to try to see z scale locomotives, etc., I have a hard time. I can t really find a site that is easy to navigate and see what s
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 17, 2011
      Hello All,

      When I get online to try to see z scale locomotives, etc., I have a hard time. I can't really find a site that is easy to navigate and see what's available. Any suggestions.

      Also - I'm a christmas train kind of guy. I want to make my own gondolas with trees in them, presents, candy canes, etc. This would be my first venture into creating my own trains - so suggestions welcome. (Affordable suggestions).

      What brought it up was I was trying to find a train that would have been used in England/London circa 1850s (Dickens' time).

      Thanks all. Keith
    • Alan Cox
      ... I fear you won t find any mechanisms small enough off the shelf. Coaches you can probably scratchbuild ok and would be mostly four wheelers. Microtrains
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 18, 2011
        > What brought it up was I was trying to find a train that would have been used in England/London circa 1850s (Dickens' time).

        I fear you won't find any mechanisms small enough off the shelf. Coaches
        you can probably scratchbuild ok and would be mostly four wheelers.
        Microtrains wheels will run in Dundas bearings and simple loop couplers
        are easy to make (the Z ones are just too big for such tiny stock as was
        used at the time). Even in N where there are a few RTR trains of that
        sort of period the RTR ones I know of are motorised by one of the coaches
        not the loco.

        You are talking four wheel wagons probably 9' wheelbase at most possibly
        less, and coaches that were little more than 3 stage coach compartments
        built onto a chassis, with the 1860's starting to lose the stagecoach
        style. All probably still with roof luggage racks, only 18-20ft long and
        still with a guard sitting up stagecoach style on the roof ends every few
        vehicles as there was no through brake at that point.

        You'd also really need to pick a particular railway as it's very early
        days and pre standardisation so each railway had its own very unique
        style - and even a choice of two gauges.

        By the 1860's things had gotten a bit bigger, although it'll still be a
        challenge, and we do know that Dickens travelled on the South Eastern
        Railway [1] in 1865 as he was involved in the Staplehurst crash.

        Alan
        [1] Later the South East & Chatham aka SECR which is what most books
        about it will cover.
      • Alan Cox
        ... For bogie vehicles its really easy to make your own as you can just buy a pair of trucks which means the hard bit is done. After that it depends on the
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 18, 2011
          > Also - I'm a christmas train kind of guy. I want to make my own gondolas with trees in them, presents, candy canes, etc. This would be my first venture into creating my own trains - so suggestions welcome. (Affordable suggestions).

          For bogie vehicles its really easy to make your own as you can just buy a
          pair of trucks which means the hard bit is done. After that it depends on
          the level of detail you want.

          Cheap, fun, low detail: draw out the wagon in a paint program. For an
          open wagon the trick is to start by drawing the wagon floor in the
          middle then attach the insides and inside ends to the drawing (so it would
          fold up into a box with the interior printed), then attach the outsides
          to the insides. It thus folds up into a box and then back down again
          around the outside to form a wagon (vans are actually easier than opens
          and can even be bad from a block of wood)

          Print it out on stiff photocard or similar, cut it out, glue it together
          and put it on a flat surface with a weight inside so it glues flat, then
          glue the trucks on. Add stiffening if needed.

          Styrene: Means actually using paint and buying bits. Cut the four
          sides/ends, file the corners at 45 degrees so they join nicely, add
          microstrip for raised bits, interior detail etc.

          Use thicker styrene to produce a floor that the ends and sides fit around.
          That way you can hide the thick floor inside the wagon. If it's going to
          be a loaded wagon you can even stick sides and ends + load top around a
          piece of sealed wooden dowel and then add trucks to the bottom.

          For coaches there are some useful cheats - build the sides in clear
          plastic sheet and find a craft person with a craft robo or similar to cut
          you out vinyl sides to go on it - paint them and then fit - clear windows
          without pain.

          Etching: which is what I do for NN3 stuff - lets you do custom trucks,
          chassis etc, means you don't have to spend ages cutting stuff out. Bit
          more of an investment but the results can be superb.

          Alan
        • y.draiggoch
          What fantastic ideas and advice! Thank you so much.
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 18, 2011
            What fantastic ideas and advice! Thank you so much.

            --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, Alan Cox <alan@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Also - I'm a christmas train kind of guy. I want to make my own gondolas with trees in them, presents, candy canes, etc. This would be my first venture into creating my own trains - so suggestions welcome. (Affordable suggestions).
            >
            > For bogie vehicles its really easy to make your own as you can just buy a
            > pair of trucks which means the hard bit is done. After that it depends on
            > the level of detail you want.
            >
            > Cheap, fun, low detail: draw out the wagon in a paint program. For an
            > open wagon the trick is to start by drawing the wagon floor in the
            > middle then attach the insides and inside ends to the drawing (so it would
            > fold up into a box with the interior printed), then attach the outsides
            > to the insides. It thus folds up into a box and then back down again
            > around the outside to form a wagon (vans are actually easier than opens
            > and can even be bad from a block of wood)
            >
            > Print it out on stiff photocard or similar, cut it out, glue it together
            > and put it on a flat surface with a weight inside so it glues flat, then
            > glue the trucks on. Add stiffening if needed.
            >
            > Styrene: Means actually using paint and buying bits. Cut the four
            > sides/ends, file the corners at 45 degrees so they join nicely, add
            > microstrip for raised bits, interior detail etc.
            >
            > Use thicker styrene to produce a floor that the ends and sides fit around.
            > That way you can hide the thick floor inside the wagon. If it's going to
            > be a loaded wagon you can even stick sides and ends + load top around a
            > piece of sealed wooden dowel and then add trucks to the bottom.
            >
            > For coaches there are some useful cheats - build the sides in clear
            > plastic sheet and find a craft person with a craft robo or similar to cut
            > you out vinyl sides to go on it - paint them and then fit - clear windows
            > without pain.
            >
            > Etching: which is what I do for NN3 stuff - lets you do custom trucks,
            > chassis etc, means you don't have to spend ages cutting stuff out. Bit
            > more of an investment but the results can be superb.
            >
            > Alan
            >
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