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Re: [Z_Scale] Re: Pennzee heavy weight truck question

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  • Alan Cox
    On Mon, 2 Aug 2010 15:31:31 -0400 ... That makes it a bit trickier. ... The drawing side isn t hard with CAD, and if its etched using a commercial etcher your
    Message 1 of 18 , Aug 3, 2010
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      On Mon, 2 Aug 2010 15:31:31 -0400
      Garth Hamilton <garth.a.hamilton@...> wrote:

      > I am sure they are easy to etch if you have the
      > materials,equipment,chemicals, and the knowledge. Then will they fit
      > the existing metal wheel sets and roll free. At present we do not have
      > any 36 inch metal wheels in Z that I know of.

      That makes it a bit trickier.

      > I figure you have to be pretty accurate with your drawings and etching
      > to get the axle end holes right and align them through two or three
      > layers of etched material during the folding and assembly.

      The drawing side isn't hard with CAD, and if its etched using a
      commercial etcher your accuracy is not a problem (home etching is another
      ball game and one I don't bother playing!). The trick I use (and its not
      original) is to align the layers using the brass bearings. Not an
      original trick at all. The other traditional thing needed (but much less
      relevant if at all nowdays) is to put any overlays directly below the
      main etch on the sheet and the same alignment so any minor distortion
      applies equally to each layer.

      > Tried to do a metal frame to use behind the truck side frame castings
      > from the Hallmark cars. The end result looked fine but the metal just
      > chewed the end of the delrin axles on the wheel sets even when the
      > axle hole was chamfered so no luck there.

      It will do - you really need turned brass bearing cups. With bearing cups
      the wheels roll very smoothly and don't wear that I can see even after
      heavy use. They also make building and assembling the bogie much easier
      as they protrude through the layers aligning it. Not sure where you would
      find them in the USA but I use Parkside Dundas ones meant for N scale -
      they fit the MT wheels nicely.

      Alan
    • Garth Hamilton
      Yes bearing cups will work but I know of no source over hear and up to now did not know of a source other 2mm society which requires membership to purchase. Do
      Message 2 of 18 , Aug 3, 2010
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        Yes bearing cups will work but I know of no source over hear and up to
        now did not know of a source other 2mm society which requires
        membership to purchase. Do not know a commercial etcher who will do
        small jobs over here either. As for the drawing I like the Japanese
        way of doing the layout of the overlays as one sheet with fold lines
        so they fold and they do up to three layers in this manner. I think
        for the builder there are much better opportunities for craftsman type
        support in the hobby in the UK than over here.

        cheerz Garth

        On Tue, Aug 3, 2010 at 5:42 AM, Alan Cox <alan@...> wrote:
        > On Mon, 2 Aug 2010 15:31:31 -0400
        > Garth Hamilton <garth.a.hamilton@...> wrote:
        >
        >> I am sure they are easy to etch if you have the
        >> materials,equipment,chemicals, and the knowledge. Then will they fit
        >> the existing metal wheel sets and roll free. At present we do not have
        >> any 36 inch metal wheels in Z that I know of.
        >
        > That makes it a bit trickier.
        >
        >> I figure you have to be pretty accurate with your drawings and etching
        >> to get the axle end holes right and align them through two or three
        >> layers of etched material during the folding and assembly.
        >
        > The drawing side isn't hard with CAD, and if its etched using a
        > commercial etcher your accuracy is not a problem (home etching is another
        > ball game and one I don't bother playing!). The trick I use (and its not
        > original) is to align the layers using the brass bearings. Not an
        > original trick at all. The other traditional thing needed (but much less
        > relevant if at all nowdays) is to put any overlays directly below the
        > main etch on the sheet and the same alignment so any minor distortion
        > applies equally to each layer.
        >
        >> Tried to do a metal frame to use behind the truck side frame castings
        >> from the Hallmark cars. The end result looked fine but the metal just
        >> chewed the end of the delrin axles on the wheel sets even when the
        >> axle hole was chamfered so no luck there.
        >
        > It will do - you really need turned brass bearing cups. With bearing cups
        > the wheels roll very smoothly and don't wear that I can see even after
        > heavy use. They also make building and assembling the bogie much easier
        > as they protrude through the layers aligning it. Not sure where you would
        > find them in the USA but I use Parkside Dundas ones meant for N scale -
        > they fit the MT wheels nicely.
        >
        > Alan
        >
      • Alan Cox
        ... Markits in the UK do them bulk, and Parkside Dundas do them in smaller volume. They are actually shallower than the 2mmSA ones which makes them even better
        Message 3 of 18 , Aug 3, 2010
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          > Yes bearing cups will work but I know of no source over hear and up to
          > now did not know of a source other 2mm society which requires
          > membership to purchase. Do not know a commercial etcher who will do

          Markits in the UK do them bulk, and Parkside Dundas do them in smaller
          volume. They are actually shallower than the 2mmSA ones which makes them
          even better for Z scale work. Markits will happily sell you them in
          hundreds or thousands at bulk prices if you think there is a US market 8)

          > small jobs over here either. As for the drawing I like the Japanese

          Not sure on US commercial etchers who will do small scale. Lots of UK
          bigger etched kit people will stick other jobs on corners of sheets
          though - dunno if it is the same in the USA or not.

          > way of doing the layout of the overlays as one sheet with fold lines
          > so they fold and they do up to three layers in this manner.

          Yes - works nicely for most things.

          Alan
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