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Re: [Z_Scale] The Metric System

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  • Rogerio Neiva
    Yes, and besides that you have earth miles, nautical miles and air miles, each of them with a different value. Lets measure speed in furlongs per quarter.
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 1, 2009
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      Yes, and besides that you have earth miles, nautical miles and air miles,
      each of them with a different value.

      Lets measure speed in furlongs per quarter.

      Roger




      On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 8:56 AM, Chris <cmanvell@...> wrote:

      > Rather than answer several different posts individually, a few comments.
      >
      > When I was writing a handbook for the US equipment I mentioned in an
      > earlier post, I discovered that there were three different nautical
      > miles: international 6080ft, UK: 6000ft and another obscure one that I
      > no longer have my documents to be able to give its exact value but I
      > suspect that it was a metric mile!
      >
      > Talking of model railway scales, go and look at the Wikipaedia article
      > at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model_railway_scales .
      >
      > 2009/3/1 David Barnblatt <DBarnblatt@... <DBarnblatt%40usa.net>>:
      > > With video, it is based on a electronic frequency... which just
      > > happens to be 60hz. So 30 fps would have 1 frame per complete
      > > cycle. Now do you want me to explain getting a 24 fps movie to a
      > > 60hz broadcast with a 3/2 pulldown?!
      >
      > Except that over here we use 50Hz!
      >
      > The Imperial measurement system is one that was developed over 100's
      > of years, with new units being added as and when required. For
      > instance, 'lines' (12=1in) and 'points' (72 to the inch) didn't exist
      > until printing came along. The furlong (furrow long) was the length of
      > a serf's patch of land and was the length of the plough's (plow's)
      > furrow. Chains were used by surveyors, as were rods/poles/perches,
      > though I cannot see where the word perch came into it. Even teh metric
      > system has changed. When I was a student it was SI (Systeme
      > Internationale) and cgs (centimetre and gram and second) system. Then
      > it became ISO (international standards organisation) which is mks
      > (metre kilogram second) based. My book of conversion factors is a 5mm
      > thick quarto size with small print.
      >
      > The railway standard gauge can be traced back to the wheel spacing of
      > Roman chariots. Who cared that it was 4ft 8.25 inches. It was just the
      > length of a piece of wood of an iron bar used by the track layers.
      >
      > Hope all that compounds the confusion!!!!
      >
      > Chris.
      >
      > --
      > Chris Manvell
      > http://trains.manvell.org.uk, http://family.manvell.org.uk,
      > http://skye.manvell.org.uk, http://bahai-faith.manvell.org.uk.
      >
      >



      --
      RN


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Daniel Baechtold
      David in fact swiss german is the easiest language of the world. no grammatic, just present, future and past perfect; and if you misspell a word just say it s
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 1, 2009
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        David

        in fact swiss german is the easiest language of the world. no grammatic, just present, future and past perfect; and if you misspell a word just say it's another swiss accent :-)

        Daniel


        <1b. Re: The Metric System
        < Posted by: "David K. Smith" david@... dks2855
        < Date: Sat Feb 28, 2009 4:28 pm ((PST))<<
        <
        <5280 feet in one mile. Very simple? Err... what about nautical miles?
        <Tons or metric tons? Ounces or troy ounces? All of those arbitrary
        <conversion numbers--5280, 12, 4, 3, etc.--must all be memorized. For
        <metric, *everything* is based on 10. Nothing to remember. It cannot
        <get any simpler.
        <
        <It's like saying English is the easiest language in the world. Well,
        <it is only if you already know it! (The Cambridge Grammar of the
        <English Language book is 1860 pages.) Spanish is actually considered
        <one of the easiest languages in the world. Why? Virtually no
        <exceptions. The same rules apply in all cases. Simple. Just like 10s.
        <
        <I'm really very sorry the US did not convert to metric when it was
        <proposed all those years ago. The government cowtowed to a population
        <of pig-headed people who simply refused to accept a superior system.
        <What a waste.
        <
        <--David<
        <
        <http://jamesriverbranch.net/
        <http://1-220.blogspot.com/

        --
        daniel baechtold
        ahornstrasse 3
        ch-4313 moehlin

        daniel.baechtold@...
        http://www.caribou.lake.ch.vu/

        Computer Bild Tarifsieger! GMX FreeDSL - Telefonanschluss + DSL
        für nur 17,95 ¿/mtl.!* http://dsl.gmx.de/?ac=OM.AD.PD003K11308T4569a
      • Alan Cox
        ... Mostly urban legend I m afraid. You can start with the fact the Britons were using chariots before the Romans (in fact the word car comes from the
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 1, 2009
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          > The railway standard gauge can be traced back to the wheel spacing of
          > Roman chariots. Who cared that it was 4ft 8.25 inches. It was just the
          > length of a piece of wood of an iron bar used by the track layers.

          Mostly urban legend I'm afraid. You can start with the fact the Britons
          were using chariots before the Romans (in fact the word 'car' comes from
          the Brythonic) and then look at early dramroad/waggonway history and the
          story all falls apart.

          The nearest anyone has gotten to sanity on this is that it looks like a
          lot of wooden waggonways would have been 5' wide measured across the
          outside edges and that being about right for a horse.

          People tend to remember the 7' gauge and the 4'8" but forget the
          large amounts of other gauges early on before railways began to link up
          and break of gauge became a problem.

          In the UK collieries did often use something in the 4'0-5'0 range but
          there were a huge mix, while some of the Welsh ones used quite narrow
          tracks even before steam.

          The Pen Y Darren locomotive (Trevithick) was believed to be 4'6" gauge
          as the inside of the flanges was recorded as 4'2" while Puffing Billy was
          5' gauge. Blenkinsops engines at Middleton colliery ran on 4'1" gauge
          track (with an outside rack). It is only the early Stephenson railways
          that any kind of consistency begins to emerge.

          I was under the impression the US , particularly southern US was similar
          in this respect.
        • Chris
          Hi Alan. I bow to your superior knowledge. I have to admit, I was alwasy a bit uneasy about it but it was cited by so may that I just assumed it was, in some
          Message 4 of 16 , Mar 1, 2009
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            Hi Alan.

            I bow to your superior knowledge. I have to admit, I was alwasy a bit
            uneasy about it but it was cited by so may that I just assumed it was,
            in some way, correct. However, this myth was perpetuated by several
            eminent railway authors at the time of my youth. I wonder how may
            books on railways still quote it - I have no time nor wish to follow
            it up now.

            All the best,
            Chris.

            2009/3/1 Alan Cox <alan@...>:
            >> The railway standard gauge can be traced back to the wheel spacing of
            >> Roman chariots. Who cared that it was 4ft 8.25 inches. It was just the
            >> length of a piece of wood of an iron bar used by the track layers.
            >
            > Mostly urban legend I'm afraid. You can start with the fact the Britons
            > were using chariots before the Romans (in fact the word 'car' comes from
            > the Brythonic) and then look at early dramroad/waggonway history and the
            > story all falls apart.

            --
            Chris Manvell
            http://trains.manvell.org.uk, http://family.manvell.org.uk,
            http://skye.manvell.org.uk, http://bahai-faith.manvell.org.uk.
          • Michael Duggan
            I was caught up when the schools were teaching metric. The problem was that the whole emphasis was on teaching conversions. How many feet is a meter? How
            Message 5 of 16 , Mar 1, 2009
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              I was caught up when the schools were teaching metric. The problem was that the whole emphasis was on teaching conversions. How many feet is a meter? How many pints in a liter? How many mph is 65 kph?

              If we'd just ditched imperial and taught metric people would have been fine. The conversions killed us. That and it being invented by the French :}

              Michael Duggan
              Jack of All Trades, Master of Some
              http://www.pawofabear.com




              ________________________________
              From: David K. Smith <david@...>
              To: z_scale@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2009 7:28:24 PM
              Subject: [Z_Scale] Re: The Metric System

              I'm really very sorry the US did not convert to metric when it was

              proposed all those years ago. The government cowtowed to a population
              of pig-headed people who simply refused to accept a superior system.
              What a waste.

              --David








              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Thomas Welsch
              I prefer my Z scale ruler for Z scale !!!!! Thom Welsch
              Message 6 of 16 , Mar 1, 2009
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                I prefer my Z scale ruler for Z scale !!!!!

                Thom Welsch
              • Manfred G
                Daniel, My dad didn t even consider Swiss German a language at all. He always called it a throat disease. :-) Manfred
                Message 7 of 16 , Mar 1, 2009
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                  Daniel,

                  My dad didn't even consider Swiss German a language at all. He always
                  called it a throat disease. :-)

                  Manfred

                  Daniel Baechtold wrote:
                  > David
                  >
                  > in fact swiss german is the easiest language of the world. no grammatic, just present, future and past perfect; and if you misspell a word just say it's another swiss accent :-)
                  >
                  > Daniel
                  >
                  >
                  > <1b. Re: The Metric System
                  > < Posted by: "David K. Smith" david@... dks2855
                  > < Date: Sat Feb 28, 2009 4:28 pm ((PST))<<
                  > <
                  > <5280 feet in one mile. Very simple? Err... what about nautical miles?
                  > <Tons or metric tons? Ounces or troy ounces? All of those arbitrary
                  > <conversion numbers--5280, 12, 4, 3, etc.--must all be memorized. For
                  > <metric, *everything* is based on 10. Nothing to remember. It cannot
                  > <get any simpler.
                  > <
                  > <It's like saying English is the easiest language in the world. Well,
                  > <it is only if you already know it! (The Cambridge Grammar of the
                  > <English Language book is 1860 pages.) Spanish is actually considered
                  > <one of the easiest languages in the world. Why? Virtually no
                  > <exceptions. The same rules apply in all cases. Simple. Just like 10s.
                  > <
                  > <I'm really very sorry the US did not convert to metric when it was
                  > <proposed all those years ago. The government cowtowed to a population
                  > <of pig-headed people who simply refused to accept a superior system.
                  > <What a waste.
                  > <
                  > <--David<
                  > <
                  > <http://jamesriverbranch.net/
                  > <http://1-220.blogspot.com/
                  >
                • Uwe Liermann
                  Hello Manfred, ... ...you must have misunderstood something there... Just imagine a nice slender girl reaching you a sweet Swiss Schoggi ... ...and you will
                  Message 8 of 16 , Mar 1, 2009
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                    Hello Manfred,

                    > My dad didn't even consider Swiss German a language at all. He always
                    > called it a throat disease. :-)

                    ...you must have misunderstood something there...

                    Just imagine a nice slender girl reaching you a sweet Swiss "Schoggi"...

                    ...and you will see that it is the most beautiful language of the
                    world....

                    ;-)))


                    --
                    GreetingZ
                    Uwe
                  • Manfred G
                    AHHHhh. Well if you put it that way I can see that it is a very nice language. Heck I m so broad minded that I will even say that it wouldn t matter what
                    Message 9 of 16 , Mar 1, 2009
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                      AHHHhh. Well if you put it that way I can see that it is a very nice
                      language. Heck I'm so broad minded that I will even say that it wouldn't
                      matter what language she was using. I would like it very much. ;-D

                      I wonder if that is due to the girl or what she is holding? Nah, better
                      not to analyze to much.

                      Manfred

                      Uwe Liermann wrote:
                      > Hello Manfred,
                      >
                      >
                      >>My dad didn't even consider Swiss German a language at all. He always
                      >>called it a throat disease. :-)
                      >
                      >
                      > ...you must have misunderstood something there...
                      >
                      > Just imagine a nice slender girl reaching you a sweet Swiss "Schoggi"...
                      >
                      > ...and you will see that it is the most beautiful language of the
                      > world....
                      >
                      > ;-)))
                      >
                      >
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