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Re: [Z_Scale] The Metric System

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  • Alan Cox
    ... Just there are at least 3 different sizes of quart. The US quart and pint being a different size to the remaining hangers on in the rest of the world, and
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 28, 2009
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      > 4 quarts in a gallon.

      Just there are at least 3 different sizes of quart. The US quart and pint
      being a different size to the remaining hangers on in the rest of the
      world, and the dry quart being different altogether in what it measures.

      The traditional modelling scales go from imperial to metric for good
      reason (old objects were in feet, model making is engineering so mm is far
      saner) - hence O - 7mm/ft , HO (half O) 3.5mm/ft. Newer scales don't
      bother with this and neither N (1:160 - only approximately 2mm/ft) and Z
      (1:220) don't bother.

      If you can happily turn miles into US customary measurements for models
      at 1:220 scale I'm impressed. At least with metric its a simple division.

      Alan
    • Alan Cox
      ... Not just the French the US were heavily involved in the early decimalisation projects and of course closely linked with the French at the time. Its a
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 28, 2009
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        > Then along came the French and invented a new system

        Not just the French the US were heavily involved in the early
        decimalisation projects and of course closely linked with the French at
        the time. Its a bizarre stroke of history that the US adopted metric
        coinage very early then skipped the rest

        > PS. What is a Canuck?

        Canucks are the people massing on the Northern border of the US
        attempting to invade it by providing culture, wit and dry humour.
        Unfortunately the horrendous exchange rate shift has managed to stop me
        from buying a Canuck GP9 ...

        Alan
      • vincentgoudreault
        ... that. ... metric ... their ... either ... S cuse me, but we ??? There are 33.5 million of us in this country. I do not remember seeing you being appointed
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 28, 2009
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          --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Matt Parker" <echo31a@...> wrote:
          >
          > So I need to learn the metric system eh. Let me say this about
          that.
          > It's fine for everyone across the pond because you've been doing
          metric
          > since the dawn of time.
          > Those of us however on this side of all that wetness are used to
          > imperial measure. The US has never entertained going to such
          > foolishness and probably never will. Good for them for standing
          their
          > ground.
          > For us Canucks, we have always thought that our government was
          either
          > on drugs, or part of a Communist conspiracy, when they changed our
          > measuring system over to metric. What an expensive joke that was.


          S'cuse me, but "we"???

          There are 33.5 million of us in this country. I do not remember
          seeing you being appointed to speak for the rest of us.



          > I'm old school and that means I'm stubborn and resistant to change
          in
          > most things. I have never found it to be beneficial in any way,
          > changing from imperial to metric. In fact, I find it to be a big
          rip
          > off. Especially when it comes to gasing up one's car.

          US gallon is not the same as Imperial gallon. Seems to me you already
          should have an issue here.

          > To those who have offered the means by which to do conversions, I
          > thankyou.
          > But as I see it, the metric system itself is a Communist plot to
          take
          > over the world.

          Communist plot? Surely you jest?

          For the record, the metric system is called "the International System
          of Units" because it is official everwhere on the planet, and since
          it was first adopted in Europe in 1791, the usage predates the birth
          of Karl Marx by three decades. The first idea of such a system can be
          traced back to Flemish mathematician in 1589, and it was first
          proposed by the first secretary of the Royal Society of London in
          1668 (John Wilkins).


          > Give me Imperial, or give me death!!!!
          >

          So, you want the rest of the world--all 7 billion of them--to switch
          on your account? Looks like you will have to go with your second
          option here.


          CBVG
        • Glen Chenier
          ... it?) ... DELETED
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 28, 2009
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            --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, David Barnblatt <DBarnblatt@...> wrote:
            >
            > There is a reason that most industrial manufacturers use a system
            > based on 10, and that the core unit of measurement is based on the
            > most abundant material on earth.
            >
            > Not imperial... Which is so confusing even to me, born n raised in
            > USA! I still can't tell you how many feet (feet?! Exactly what is
            it?)
            > is in a mile.
            >
            > Best to learn metric if you want to learn Z!
            >
            >
            > On Feb 28, 2009, at 12:51, "Matt Parker" <echo31a@...> wrote:



            DELETED
          • Glen Chenier
            ... miles? ... For ... Well, ... considered ... 10s. ... population ... system.
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 28, 2009
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              --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "David K. Smith" <david@...> wrote:
              >
              > 5280 feet in one mile. Very simple? Err... what about nautical
              miles?
              > Tons or metric tons? Ounces or troy ounces? All of those arbitrary
              > conversion numbers--5280, 12, 4, 3, etc.--must all be memorized.
              For
              > metric, *everything* is based on 10. Nothing to remember. It cannot
              > get any simpler.
              >
              > It's like saying English is the easiest language in the world.
              Well,
              > it is only if you already know it! (The Cambridge Grammar of the
              > English Language book is 1860 pages.) Spanish is actually
              considered
              > one of the easiest languages in the world. Why? Virtually no
              > exceptions. The same rules apply in all cases. Simple. Just like
              10s.
              >
              > I'm really very sorry the US did not convert to metric when it was
              > proposed all those years ago. The government cowtowed to a
              population
              > of pig-headed people who simply refused to accept a superior
              system.
              > What a waste.
              >
              > --David
              >
              > http://jamesriverbranch.net/
              > http://1-220.blogspot.com/
              >
              > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Parker <echo31a@> wrote:
              > >
              >DELETED
            • Glen Chenier
              ... a ... for ... be a ... £1_ ... or ... and ... needed ... system - ... only ... generation ... DELETED
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 28, 2009
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                --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, Chris <cmanvell@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi Matt.
                >
                > Britain didn't change over to the metric system until relatively
                > recently and I still sometimes work in feet and inches (which
                > themselves are an import from the Romans - one inch is the width of
                a
                > thumb and one foot is the length of a foot!). But if I had a pound
                for
                > every time I have cut a piece of wood 2 inches too short, I would
                be a
                > wealthy man. We had pounds shillings and pence (12d = 1 sh, 20s =
                £1_
                > and Guineas (=21sh a special for the wealthy, that I am not) and
                > groats and farthings. We had ounces, pounds, stones, quarters,
                > hundredweights (=112lb) and tons. We had inches, feet, yards,
                > rods/poles/perches (=5.25 yards), chains, furlongs and miles. It was
                > all a schoolchild's nightmare.
                >
                > Then along came the French and invented a new system based on an
                > inaccurately calculated length called the metre, which the Americans
                > call a meter, which for us is something that measures how much gas
                or
                > electricity we have used. So pretty well teh whole world now used a
                > modified version of this system. (The communists went one further
                and
                > tried to metricate their clocks and dates, but that was a total
                > failure.)
                >
                > We bought some American kit about 30 years ago. Great until one
                needed
                > to repair or update it and we had to go to US suppliers with all the
                > complications of getting import licenses etc. to get imperial
                > measurement parts. But I remember one of the US engineers telling me
                > that the US had tried to change but that commerce refused to do it
                > with massive financial loss to US exports.
                >
                > The best system is not the decimal system but the duodecimal
                system -
                > 12 can be divided by 2, 3, 4, 6, and partially by 8 and 9. 10 can
                only
                > be divided by 2 and 5. 1/7 cannot be expressed exactly in decimal.
                >
                > In other words, both systems have their advantages and for older
                > people, like me, changing can be difficult but our younger
                generation
                > finds imperial confusing and illogical. BUT...
                >
                > We still use lb and oz, miles (on roads) and pints (of beer) though
                > our pint is a REAL pint at 20 fluid ounces. :o)
                >
                > All the best,
                > Chris.
                >
                > PS. What is a Canuck?
                >
                > > On Feb 28, 2009, at 12:51, "Matt Parker" <echo31a@...> wrote:

                DELETED
              • Glen Chenier
                ... yards in a mile. Very simple. 12 inches in a foot, 3 feet in a yard, 4 quarts in a gallon. 2 pints in a quart. 365 days in a year. 366 in a leap year. ...
                Message 7 of 10 , Feb 28, 2009
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                  --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Parker <echo31a@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > 5280 feet in one mile. Divide that by 3 and it gives you how many
                  yards in a mile. Very simple. 12 inches in a foot, 3 feet in a yard,
                  4 quarts in a gallon. 2 pints in a quart. 365 days in a year. 366 in
                  a leap year.
                  >
                  > Just threw the last one in for a joke.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > To: z_scale@yahoogroups.com
                  > From: DBarnblatt@...
                  > Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2009 14:12:03 -0800
                  > Subject: Re: [Z_Scale] The Metric System
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > There is a reason that most industrial manufacturers use a system
                  > based on 10, and that the core unit of measurement is based on the
                  > most abundant material on earth.
                  >
                  > Not imperial... Which is so confusing even to me, born n raised in
                  > USA! I still can't tell you how many feet (feet?! Exactly what is
                  it?)
                  > is in a mile.
                  >
                  > Best to learn metric if you want to learn Z!
                  >
                  > On Feb 28, 2009, at 12:51, "Matt Parker" <echo31a@...> wrote:
                  >

                  DELETED
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