Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [z_scale] Re: Z Stigma (long)

Expand Messages
  • bjkronen@aol.com
    John: Before Rob can answer, I ll put my dime in the pay phone. Make that a dollar s worth, I m on my soapbox. Its not what we are, its what we are NOT, that
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 2, 2001
      John:

      Before Rob can answer, I'll put my dime in the pay phone. Make that a
      dollar's worth, I'm on my soapbox.

      Its not what we are, its what we are NOT, that helps to "trap" us in a
      certain image outside of our own small Z scale community.

      Small layouts? Heck, we've all seen briefcase layouts that just blow you
      away. Countless hours invested in them, and the results are just
      outstanding. The Nn3 "pizza" layout would be a great example, too.

      Coffee table layouts? There is a Z coffee table layout less than 2 miles
      from me, that if it ever comes up for sale, I'll ask the price AFTER I load
      it up in my car. Its a priceless piece of work done by a NMRA Master Modeler
      (he won Best of NTS show, twice, in N scale). Hand laid track and turnouts,
      rock carving that could not be improved by Michaelangelo himself. All
      structures are scale craftsman quality board-by-board construction.

      Suitcase layouts? At the national train show, Jeffrey won "best of show"
      against dozens and dozens of efforts by established and recognized modelers.
      You can rest assured it was not a couple of Plasticville buildings rubber
      cemented down to a 4x8 foot sheet of plywood, and green grass cut off a roll
      to fit in between the tracks. It won because it was a labor of love and
      clearly earned the recognition it got. Since it's longer than most sofa's,
      I'd be tasked to call it a coffee table size layout.

      But the image, in the past, has stopped there. The average person does not
      ever see anything bigger. Sure, I've got some bookmarks of huge layouts in
      Germany. And some of the list members have shared pictures of some pretty
      large layouts they have. But outside of the 426 members on this list, how
      many ordinary folks have any idea that larger layouts can exist in Z? Almost
      zero I'd bet.

      Ask a person familiar with trains what Z is, they may just turn around and
      say something like "Oh, that's the briefcase scale; they are so cute."
      THAT's the image problem. It is NOT a problem with our scale, our rolling
      stock, our abilities or the size layouts we build and enjoy.

      What a handful of folks in Europe, Dallas, Washington and Houston are trying
      to do is to simply break that mold. The image that Z cannot possibly get
      bigger than x by y feet and run with more than 3 cars behind the loco on a
      perfect circle of track. That we enjoy "toys," not "model railroading." In
      many cases, that Z scale even exists at all.

      Within the model community, there are model shows all over the world. N-Trak
      displays of enormous sizes show up at GATS, at the Euro equivalent and in
      Japan as well. I've even been "down under" and seen HO and N monsters in
      public. You see also huge HO, S, TT and G layouts at these public displays.
      The model magazines take great delight at showing HO and N scale swimming
      pool sized layouts in basements ever month. Layouts that take 5 or more
      people just to run.

      But what do the magazines publish on Z? A circle of track in a cigar box.
      Or two circles on the back of a cut down door (Great Model Railroads 1997 I
      believe).

      That's the image that needs breaking.

      We "can" run 100 car trains on 16 miles of track, if we "want" to. We "can"
      do serious "operations," if we want to. We "can" run DCC, if we want to. We
      "can" go to the shows with big layouts, if we want to. We are NOT bound by
      the size of a briefcase or table in our layouts. In short, this scale can do
      anything the "big boys" can do.

      And do it at shows in front of modelers and public alike; expand the image of
      what this scale can be; get more than 425 folks on this list; and attract
      some manufacturers to the smell of sales.

      Or, if we "want to," enjoy a smaller, highly detailed, layout at home every
      day after work (without giving up an entire room or basement like the big
      boys have to).

      By the way, my first Z layout was a circle of track on a piece of unpainted
      board. And I thought it was great.

      Hope no one spilled their coffee or tea while reading my thoughts. The
      Delete key is just to the left of the "End" key.

      Regards,
      Bill Kronenberger
      Houston
    • Ole Rosted
      On Thu, 2 Aug 2001 03:02:28 EDT, Bill Kronenberger wrote: Hi, [snip a lot] Had I read Bill s letter before I wrote my own, I wouldn t have bothered. Bill says
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 2, 2001
        On Thu, 2 Aug 2001 03:02:28 EDT, Bill Kronenberger wrote:

        Hi,

        [snip a lot]

        Had I read Bill's letter before I wrote my own, I wouldn't have
        bothered. Bill says it all!
        Love for Z has never before been expressed in such an exquisite
        manner.

        regards Ole Rosted
      • stamperdream@yahoo.ca
        I agree with Ole... well said, Bill! Keep that soapbox close and use it often ;-) Cheers, Jeffrey ... exquisite
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 2, 2001
          I agree with Ole... well said, Bill! Keep that soapbox close and
          use it often ;-)

          Cheers,
          Jeffrey

          --- In z_scale@y..., Ole Rosted <Ole.Rosted@g...> wrote:
          > On Thu, 2 Aug 2001 03:02:28 EDT, Bill Kronenberger wrote:
          >
          > Hi,
          >
          > [snip a lot]
          >
          > Had I read Bill's letter before I wrote my own, I wouldn't have
          > bothered. Bill says it all!
          > Love for Z has never before been expressed in such an
          exquisite
          > manner.
          >
          > regards Ole Rosted
        • jcubbin@optonline.net
          I can understand wanting to create large(r) layouts if you believe it will attract both manufacturers and new users, those I believe are great reasons. I tend
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 2, 2001
            I can understand wanting to create large(r) layouts if you believe it will attract both manufacturers and new users, those I believe are
            great reasons. I tend to agree more with Ole here, the beauty is in the precision and detail, not the mass. The recent NTS win was I'm
            assuming, because of the level of detail, the creativity and imagination of Jeffrey... not because it was almost as big as the other
            layouts. I think things like the NTS win or getting ZTrack into hobby stores will have more impact than a larger layout.

            Instead of thinking of small Z layouts as briefcase layouts, I tend to think of larger scale layouts as "roofing trains". It's actually a good
            deal more accurate as many of the larger layouts are based on 4' x 8' sheets of plywood.

            I read MR (though not religiously) and go through the internet a bit on other train sites, yet the only place I've heard a small Z layout
            referred to as a "cigar box" layout is on this very forum. With self-denigration like that, who needs (bigger scale) enemies?

            It's not that I don't like larger Z layouts, I really do. But I don't believe they're necessary to validate the scale itself. Again if the goal is to
            induce manufacturers and new users, then I'm all for it. If the goal is to be recognized as a peer by the larger scales... maybe I'm too
            new to Z and to trains themselves, but I don't see the inherent value in it.

            John
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.