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fixing 0-8-8-0 Marklin Mallet.

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  • Garth Hamilton
    I do not know if anyone else out there has had problems with this engine but Glenn and Sandy Stiska have a fix and gave me a clue as to the cure. They will do
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 2, 2007
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      I do not know if anyone else out there has had problems with this
      engine but Glenn and Sandy Stiska have a fix and gave me a clue as to
      the cure. They will do the work for a modest fee. At least modest in
      my estimation.

      The blind gear that is not pinned in the tower just has to be pinned
      in place. No quite so easy as it is said. I used a piece of copper
      not brass tubing. The tubing was .0635 inches in OD or 1.62 mm and I
      spun solder onto it to increase the OD to .0725 inches or 1.84mm and
      soldered a drill bit shank into the end of the tube. The drill bit
      was a slide fit into the tube and it was soldered in place before
      the spin soldering of the tube was done. The drill bit was .032
      inches which is a No. 67 bit. When you look at your engine you will
      see on one side the hole is bigger than on the other. So I cut the
      drill shank so that .070 inches or 1.8 mm are showing and then
      pressed it into the hole. I was a tight fit going through the hole in
      the wheel wiper and I made sure the shaft did not protrude very far
      from the smaller hole on the other side of the tower. Once I was sure
      of the fit. I cut the tubing about .08 inches or 2.0 mm long and
      result is a stub shaft sticking out of a hub and the whole assembly
      is about .15 of an inch long. Once in place I used a drop of nail
      varnish over the hub end only to hold it in the larger hole. This
      stub shaft prevents the blind gear in the tower from moving out of
      position. The nail varnish will also prevent a short should it work
      it way out of position. This brass tubing is a standard size from KS
      in my LHS. Total time to make two of these a fit them about 90
      minutes. The tough part is spinning solder to increase the OD. This
      is a bit of an art and if you use a small amount of epoxy or locktite
      you can fix the tubing hub in place with out getting it to be a press
      fit. You could also fit the drill shank in place in the tubing using
      the same products. To solder the drill shank into the brass tube you
      will need a special flux for use in soldering stainless steel to
      copper and brass. This hub goes into the chassis far enough to hold
      gear against far side of the tower while allowing it to rotate freely
      and the drill shank becomes the axle for the blind gear and protrudes
      slightly from the smaller hole. The tower is just under .15 of an
      inch wide or 3.8mm.

      regards
      Garth
    • Jeff BAZ-man
      So was the pin missing originally? Why would this pin need to be added in a standard production version? Jeff SF Bay Area Z ... to ... in ... pinned ... I ...
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 2, 2007
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        So was the pin missing originally? Why would this pin need to be
        added in a standard production version?

        Jeff
        SF Bay Area Z

        --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, Garth Hamilton <garthah@...> wrote:
        >
        > I do not know if anyone else out there has had problems with this
        > engine but Glenn and Sandy Stiska have a fix and gave me a clue as
        to
        > the cure. They will do the work for a modest fee. At least modest
        in
        > my estimation.
        >
        > The blind gear that is not pinned in the tower just has to be
        pinned
        > in place. No quite so easy as it is said. I used a piece of copper
        > not brass tubing. The tubing was .0635 inches in OD or 1.62 mm and
        I
        > spun solder onto it to increase the OD to .0725 inches or 1.84mm
        and
        > soldered a drill bit shank into the end of the tube. The drill bit
        > was a slide fit into the tube and it was soldered in place before
        > the spin soldering of the tube was done. The drill bit was .032
        > inches which is a No. 67 bit. When you look at your engine you
        will
        > see on one side the hole is bigger than on the other. So I cut the
        > drill shank so that .070 inches or 1.8 mm are showing and then
        > pressed it into the hole. I was a tight fit going through the hole
        in
        > the wheel wiper and I made sure the shaft did not protrude very
        far
        > from the smaller hole on the other side of the tower. Once I was
        sure
        > of the fit. I cut the tubing about .08 inches or 2.0 mm long and
        > result is a stub shaft sticking out of a hub and the whole
        assembly
        > is about .15 of an inch long. Once in place I used a drop of nail
        > varnish over the hub end only to hold it in the larger hole. This
        > stub shaft prevents the blind gear in the tower from moving out of
        > position. The nail varnish will also prevent a short should it
        work
        > it way out of position. This brass tubing is a standard size from
        KS
        > in my LHS. Total time to make two of these a fit them about 90
        > minutes. The tough part is spinning solder to increase the OD.
        This
        > is a bit of an art and if you use a small amount of epoxy or
        locktite
        > you can fix the tubing hub in place with out getting it to be a
        press
        > fit. You could also fit the drill shank in place in the tubing
        using
        > the same products. To solder the drill shank into the brass tube
        you
        > will need a special flux for use in soldering stainless steel to
        > copper and brass. This hub goes into the chassis far enough to
        hold
        > gear against far side of the tower while allowing it to rotate
        freely
        > and the drill shank becomes the axle for the blind gear and
        protrudes
        > slightly from the smaller hole. The tower is just under .15 of an
        > inch wide or 3.8mm.
        >
        > regards
        > Garth
        >
      • Garth Hamilton
        Hi Jeff I expect there was a plan for there to be a pin here but it was either missed on production set up or they could not fit it with the production
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 2, 2007
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          Hi Jeff

          I expect there was a plan for there to be a pin here but it was
          either missed on production set up or they could not fit it with the
          production equipment. I do not recall there ever being a pin here and
          this means the gear which is steel floats in the slot between the
          nylon or plastic gear that connects with the worm and the two axle
          gears and over time the clearance increases to the point where the
          system jams up when the gear moves to far to one side and no longers
          contacts both axle gears. I expect with only casual running it does
          not happen any time soon but appears after a period of continual
          running and sitting between shows. Since Glenn and Sandy Stiska have
          a fix for it they have obviously seen the problem at least once and
          fixed it.

          regards
          Garth



          --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff BAZ-man" <sjbazman49@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > So was the pin missing originally? Why would this pin need to be
          > added in a standard production version?
          >
          > Jeff
          > SF Bay Area Z
          >
          > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, Garth Hamilton <garthah@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I do not know if anyone else out there has had problems with this
          > > engine but Glenn and Sandy Stiska have a fix and gave me a clue
          as
          > to
          > > the cure. They will do the work for a modest fee. At least modest
          > in
          > > my estimation.
          > >
          > > The blind gear that is not pinned in the tower just has to be
          > pinned
          > > in place. No quite so easy as it is said. I used a piece of
          copper
          > > not brass tubing. The tubing was .0635 inches in OD or 1.62 mm
          and
          > I
          > > spun solder onto it to increase the OD to .0725 inches or 1.84mm
          > and
          > > soldered a drill bit shank into the end of the tube. The drill
          bit
          > > was a slide fit into the tube and it was soldered in place
          before
          > > the spin soldering of the tube was done. The drill bit was .032
          > > inches which is a No. 67 bit. When you look at your engine you
          > will
          > > see on one side the hole is bigger than on the other. So I cut
          the
          > > drill shank so that .070 inches or 1.8 mm are showing and then
          > > pressed it into the hole. I was a tight fit going through the
          hole
          > in
          > > the wheel wiper and I made sure the shaft did not protrude very
          > far
          > > from the smaller hole on the other side of the tower. Once I was
          > sure
          > > of the fit. I cut the tubing about .08 inches or 2.0 mm long and
          > > result is a stub shaft sticking out of a hub and the whole
          > assembly
          > > is about .15 of an inch long. Once in place I used a drop of nail
          > > varnish over the hub end only to hold it in the larger hole. This
          > > stub shaft prevents the blind gear in the tower from moving out
          of
          > > position. The nail varnish will also prevent a short should it
          > work
          > > it way out of position. This brass tubing is a standard size from
          > KS
          > > in my LHS. Total time to make two of these a fit them about 90
          > > minutes. The tough part is spinning solder to increase the OD.
          > This
          > > is a bit of an art and if you use a small amount of epoxy or
          > locktite
          > > you can fix the tubing hub in place with out getting it to be a
          > press
          > > fit. You could also fit the drill shank in place in the tubing
          > using
          > > the same products. To solder the drill shank into the brass tube
          > you
          > > will need a special flux for use in soldering stainless steel to
          > > copper and brass. This hub goes into the chassis far enough to
          > hold
          > > gear against far side of the tower while allowing it to rotate
          > freely
          > > and the drill shank becomes the axle for the blind gear and
          > protrudes
          > > slightly from the smaller hole. The tower is just under .15 of an
          > > inch wide or 3.8mm.
          > >
          > > regards
          > > Garth
          > >
          >
        • Garth Hamilton
          Here is the text of the message that I placed on the Z-scale forum early last month. I do not know if anyone else out there has had problems with this engine
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 1, 2007
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            Here is the text of the message that I placed on the Z-scale forum
            early last month.

            I do not know if anyone else out there has had problems with this
            engine (Marklin 0-8-8-0 Mallet) but Glenn and Sandy Stiska have a fix
            and gave me a clue as to the cure. They will do the work for a modest
            fee. At least modest in my estimation.

            The blind gear that is not pinned in the tower just has to be pinned
            in place. No quite so easy as it is said. It appears that over time
            with wear that the clearances open up enough to allow the blind gear
            to move laterally in the tower and when they do go it grabs the
            inside of the casting and looses contact with one of the axle gears
            and the whole thing jams up and stops. Classic symptom is side rods
            out of alinement.

            I used a piece of copper not brass tubing. The tubing was .0635
            inches in OD or 1.62 mm and I spun solder onto it to increase the OD
            to .0725 inches or 1.84mm after soldered a drill bit shank into the
            end of the tube. The drill bit was a slide fit into the tube and it
            was soldered in place before the spin soldering of the tube was done.
            The drill bit was .032 inches which is a No. 67 bit. When you look at
            your engine you will see on one side the hole is bigger than on the
            other. So I cut the drill shank so that .070 inches or 1.8 mm are
            showing and then pressed it into the hole. It was a tight fit going
            through the hole in the wheel wiper and I made sure the shaft did not
            protrude very far from the smaller hole on the other side of the
            tower. Once I was sure of the fit. I cut the tubing about .08 inches
            or 2.0 mm long and result is a stub shaft sticking out of a hub and
            the whole assembly is about .15 of an inch long. Once in place I used
            a drop of black nail varnish over the hub end only to hold it in the
            larger hole. This stub shaft prevents the blind gear in the tower
            from moving out of position laterally. The nail varnish will also
            prevent a short should it work its way out of position and touch the
            pickup strip. This brass tubing is a standard size from KS in my LHS.
            Total time to make two of these a fit them about 90 minutes. The
            tough part is spinning solder to increase the OD. This is a bit of an
            art and if you use a small amount of epoxy or locktite you can fix
            the tubing hub in place with out getting it to be a press fit. You
            could also fit the drill shank in place in the tubing using the same
            products. However when using these products there is a chance of
            contaminating the inside of the tower and freezing the gear(s) in
            place. To solder the drill shank into the brass tube you will need a
            special flux for use in soldering stainless steel to copper and
            brass. This hub goes into the chassis far enough to hold gear against
            far side of the tower while allowing it to rotate freely it is held
            upright and the drill shank becomes the axle for the blind gear and
            protrudes slightly from the smaller hole on the opposite side of the
            tower. The tower is just under .15 of an inch wide or 3.8mm.

            Here is some additional information on my make over.

            I used a K36 boiler shell and extended the firebox area a bit and
            used a K27 cab for my 2-8-8-2 Mallet and built my front porch from
            salvage from a Rivarossi Mallet pilot. My K27's will pull easily 20
            cars around my layout and the Mallet will pull 30 cars with the same
            ease. There is a picture of my beast under construction on my web
            site www.nn3.ca for those interested.

            Spin soldering - I chuck the pieces of tubing in a 3 jaw hand crank
            drill and clamp the hand drill in a vise with the crank on top and
            the tubing extending out horizontally. The tubing has to extend
            beyond the chuck by at least 3 inches for my 15 watt iron to do the
            job. I heat the end of the tubing and get it coated with solder and
            then start the crank and as the tub turns add more solder to it while
            keeping the heat to it. Then when it is flowing nicely I with draw
            the heat and solder and continue spinning and after the colour
            changes I let it sit for a bit and then dress it with a file while
            turning it. Then check to OD to see if it is close to what I want. I
            learned this trick in a silver smithing class.

            regards
            Garth
          • Loren Snyder
            Hi Garth, While I didn t try to carefully visualize every detail in your description of your repair procedures, (I don t have one of those beasts that is
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 1, 2007
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              Hi Garth,

              While I didn't try to carefully visualize every detail in your description
              of your repair procedures, (I don't have one of those beasts that is acting
              up), I couldn't help but feel a sense of appreciation and pride in the
              detailed report you shared of your repair procedures. Your account gives
              the reader a concise analysis of what you did to repair the loco.

              In other words, I am impressed with the thought that you put forth in
              sharing your adventures in the "Mallet repair manual" It isn't easy to put
              your thoughts into words when writing instructions so that the reader will
              be able to visualize and understand what you are saying. Robert Ray once
              told me that writing instructions for a kit is the hardest part of the
              project.

              And to think that today there are folks out there who look at our tiny
              trains and think, "how cute".........never imagining the amount of detail,
              effort, and dedication that we Z modelers put forth to "make em run right"

              Me thinks that we Z scalers are a special bunch, whether the rest of the
              world knows it or not.

              Great job on the narrative....."equal to a case study report in the American
              medical journal"

              Good job Dr. Garth :O)

              Loren

              -------Original Message-------

              From: Garth Hamilton
              Date: 11/1/2007 7:31:22 AM
              To: Z_scale@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Z_Scale] fixing 0-8-8-0 Marklin Mallet.

              Here is the text of the message that I placed on the Z-scale forum
              early last month.

              I do not know if anyone else out there has had problems with this
              engine (Marklin 0-8-8-0 Mallet) but Glenn and Sandy Stiska have a fix
              and gave me a clue as to the cure. They will do the work for a modest
              fee. At least modest in my estimation.

              The blind gear that is not pinned in the tower just has to be pinned
              in place. No quite so easy as it is said. It appears that over time
              with wear that the clearances open up enough to allow the blind gear
              to move laterally in the tower and when they do go it grabs the
              inside of the casting and looses contact with one of the axle gears
              and the whole thing jams up and stops. Classic symptom is side rods
              out of alinement.

              I used a piece of copper not brass tubing. The tubing was .0635
              inches in OD or 1.62 mm and I spun solder onto it to increase the OD
              to .0725 inches or 1.84mm after soldered a drill bit shank into the
              end of the tube. The drill bit was a slide fit into the tube and it
              was soldered in place before the spin soldering of the tube was done.
              The drill bit was .032 inches which is a No. 67 bit. When you look at
              your engine you will see on one side the hole is bigger than on the
              other. So I cut the drill shank so that .070 inches or 1.8 mm are
              showing and then pressed it into the hole. It was a tight fit going
              through the hole in the wheel wiper and I made sure the shaft did not
              protrude very far from the smaller hole on the other side of the
              tower. Once I was sure of the fit. I cut the tubing about .08 inches
              or 2.0 mm long and result is a stub shaft sticking out of a hub and
              the whole assembly is about .15 of an inch long. Once in place I used
              a drop of black nail varnish over the hub end only to hold it in the
              larger hole. This stub shaft prevents the blind gear in the tower
              from moving out of position laterally. The nail varnish will also
              prevent a short should it work its way out of position and touch the
              pickup strip. This brass tubing is a standard size from KS in my LHS.
              Total time to make two of these a fit them about 90 minutes. The
              tough part is spinning solder to increase the OD. This is a bit of an
              art and if you use a small amount of epoxy or locktite you can fix
              the tubing hub in place with out getting it to be a press fit. You
              could also fit the drill shank in place in the tubing using the same
              products. However when using these products there is a chance of
              contaminating the inside of the tower and freezing the gear(s) in
              place. To solder the drill shank into the brass tube you will need a
              special flux for use in soldering stainless steel to copper and
              brass. This hub goes into the chassis far enough to hold gear against
              far side of the tower while allowing it to rotate freely it is held
              upright and the drill shank becomes the axle for the blind gear and
              protrudes slightly from the smaller hole on the opposite side of the
              tower. The tower is just under .15 of an inch wide or 3.8mm.

              Here is some additional information on my make over.

              I used a K36 boiler shell and extended the firebox area a bit and
              used a K27 cab for my 2-8-8-2 Mallet and built my front porch from
              salvage from a Rivarossi Mallet pilot. My K27's will pull easily 20
              cars around my layout and the Mallet will pull 30 cars with the same
              ease. There is a picture of my beast under construction on my web
              site www.nn3.ca for those interested.

              Spin soldering - I chuck the pieces of tubing in a 3 jaw hand crank
              drill and clamp the hand drill in a vise with the crank on top and
              the tubing extending out horizontally. The tubing has to extend
              beyond the chuck by at least 3 inches for my 15 watt iron to do the
              job. I heat the end of the tubing and get it coated with solder and
              then start the crank and as the tub turns add more solder to it while
              keeping the heat to it. Then when it is flowing nicely I with draw
              the heat and solder and continue spinning and after the colour
              changes I let it sit for a bit and then dress it with a file while
              turning it. Then check to OD to see if it is close to what I want. I
              learned this trick in a silver smithing class.

              regards
              Garth






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Glen Chenier
              ... gives ... ... Thank you Garth for sharing your skills. Garth s very detailed and informative article has been added to the wealth of information in the Z
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 1, 2007
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                --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Loren Snyder" <ljsnyder@...> wrote:
                ... I couldn't help but feel a sense of appreciation and pride in the
                > detailed report you shared of your repair procedures. Your account
                gives
                > the reader a concise analysis of what you did to repair the loco.
                ...

                Thank you Garth for sharing your skills. Garth's very detailed and
                informative article has been added to the wealth of information in
                the Z Scale enZyclopedia under Performance/Locomotives. For those
                not familiar with this feature of our Z_Scale list, scroll halfway
                down the home page and find the link between the home page photo and
                the most recent messages:

                "Got questions? Get answers!
                Z_Scale enZyclopedia
                (Everything you ever wanted to know about Z but didn't know where to
                look!)"

                And speaking of Home Page Photos, there are only 5 more left in the
                chute. I try to change the photo between once a week to twice a
                week, and soon more will be needed. To submit your favorite Z Scale
                photo just upload it to the Home Page Photo folder with title,
                description, name of owner, and credit for any items in the photo
                built by a fellow modeller. These photos will be captioned with the
                same information and placed on the Home Page in the chronological
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