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Re: MU Question - Where to place the faster locomotive? - Grades and couplers

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  • Ellsworth Geib
    Glenn, Whatever the grade easement recommendations turn out to be, their necessity adds some complications to track planning. It increases the horizontal
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 25, 2007
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      Glenn,

      Whatever the grade easement recommendations turn out to be, their necessity adds some
      complications to track planning. It increases the horizontal distance needed to achieve a
      given height if you want to keep the maximum grade to some ideal percentage, say 2
      percent. If the horizontal distance is fixed, then the resulting grade between the two
      easements is going to be steeper than might be desired.

      Ell
      --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Glen Chenier" <glen@...> wrote:
      >
      > Isn't it great how some preliminary testing and experimenting can flush
      > out unexpected bugs? Grades can be a real challenge in many ways to
      > make them work properly. Vertical easements especially, and not much
      > in track planning books about grade transitions. I seem to recall
      > reading many years ago someone recommending no more than 1/2 to 1 %
      > grade change for every longest locomotive or car length, depending on
      > coupler characteristics and distance from wheels to coupler. This was
      > worst case, some rolling stock is more forgiving.
      >
      > So this begs another question - can anyone suggest from experience
      > grade easement recommendations for Z scale?
      >
      >
      > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Ellsworth Geib" <geib@> wrote:
      > >...
      > > The purpose of my crude tests was simply getting an idea of how badly
      > grades and curves
      > > might affect performance and car pulling capacity. I hadn't been
      > thinking about the
      > > coupler problem. However, it was a clear example of the need to have
      > some transition
      > > going into a grade, especially when going from a downhill to an
      > uphill grade. And of
      > > course, going directly from downhill to uphill in the middle of a
      > relatively sharp curve,
      > > such as the 195 mm, is the worst situation.
      >
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