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RE : RE: [Z_Scale] Reducing G Scale to Z Scale

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  • de Champeaux Dominique
    Don t forget G deals with 1:22.5 when narrow gauge, still running on 45mm broad track. When dealing with standard gauge, on 45mm broad track, G is 1/29.5. So
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 2, 2007
      Don't forget G deals with 1:22.5 when narrow gauge,
      still running on 45mm broad track.

      When dealing with standard gauge, on 45mm broad track,
      G is 1/29.5.

      So in this last case the ratio is something like 1/9.5

      Dom




      --- Don Avila <d.f.avila@...> a écrit :

      > I wouldn't put my whole retirement on this, but
      > stuff I have picked up
      > along the way is G = 1:22.5






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    • Don Avila
      The real problem is how do you know that the “G” dimensions you are using are really properly scaled. After reading this whole thread it almost seems that
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 2, 2007
        The real problem is how do you know that the “G” dimensions you are
        using are really properly scaled. After reading this whole thread it
        almost seems that “G” is in the eye of the beholder.

        Don


        -----Original Message-----
        From: z_scale@yahoogroups.com [mailto:z_scale@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of de Champeaux Dominique
        Sent: Friday, March 02, 2007 8:07 AM
        To: z_scale@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE : RE: [Z_Scale] Reducing G Scale to Z Scale

        Don't forget G deals with 1:22.5 when narrow gauge,
        still running on 45mm broad track.

        When dealing with standard gauge, on 45mm broad track,
        G is 1/29.5.

        So in this last case the ratio is something like 1/9.5

        Dom

        --- Don Avila <d.f.avila@att. <mailto:d.f.avila%40att.net> net> a écrit
        :

        > I wouldn't put my whole retirement on this, but
        > stuff I have picked up
        > along the way is G = 1:22.5





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        questions !
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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Lois & Carl Feyerherm
        John B. G scale varies in size from 1:22.5 to 1:29 depending on the brand however the track is identical (rail centers). Depending on what you plan to reduce
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 2, 2007
          John B.

          G scale varies in size from 1:22.5 to 1:29 depending on the brand however the track is identical (rail centers). Depending on what you plan to reduce be sure you know what the ratio of the G scale is before you do any reducing.

          Carl
          In Nebraska in a blowing snow advisory or blizzard warning depending on how far west and south you are of the Missouri River



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Allan Borg
          Interesingly enough I seem to have seen somewhere that the individual scales in the G range have sometimes been divided into other reference designations
          Message 4 of 16 , Mar 3, 2007
            Interesingly enough I seem to have seen somewhere that the individual
            scales in the "G" range have sometimes been divided into other
            reference designations being G H I and J or was it F G H and I, while
            1/32 is Marklin's "1" gauge.
            Allan Borg

            >
            > John B.
            >
            > G scale varies in size from 1:22.5 to 1:29 depending on the brand
            however the track is identical (rail centers). Depending on what you
            plan to reduce be sure you know what the ratio of the G scale is before
            you do any reducing.
            >
            > Carl
            > In Nebraska in a blowing snow advisory or blizzard warning depending
            on how far west and south you are of the Missouri River
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Allan Miller
            I believe that s true, although very few are using those designations. For one thing, it leads to extra effort and confusion on the part of the hobbyist
            Message 5 of 16 , Mar 4, 2007
              I believe that's true, although very few are using those designations.
              For one thing, it leads to extra effort and confusion on the part of
              the hobbyist because it requires the individual to actually know what
              scale the letters designate. "G" was relatively easy back when any
              Large Scale trains were pretty much grouped under that designation (as
              is Z and most other scales), but with the emergence of 1:20.3, 1:22.5,
              1:24, 1:29, and 1:32 (among some others) as viable scales in their own
              rite, going with letters just adds to the complexity.

              For example, Z alone probably means nothing to most novices; you
              pretty much have to expand on the designation every time you introduce
              someone to the hobby by explaining that the models are 1:220 the size
              of the prototype. Ditto for N, HO, S, O (and OO), etc. And then
              there's the added explanations that are needed for Nn3, HOn3, On30,
              and the like.

              --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Allan Borg" <themohican2003@...> wrote:
              >
              > Interesingly enough I seem to have seen somewhere that the individual
              > scales in the "G" range have sometimes been divided into other
              > reference designations being G H I and J or was it F G H and I, while
              > 1/32 is Marklin's "1" gauge.
              > Allan Borg
              >
              > >
              > > John B.
              > >
              > > G scale varies in size from 1:22.5 to 1:29 depending on the brand
              > however the track is identical (rail centers). Depending on what you
              > plan to reduce be sure you know what the ratio of the G scale is before
              > you do any reducing.
              > >
              > > Carl
              > > In Nebraska in a blowing snow advisory or blizzard warning depending
              > on how far west and south you are of the Missouri River
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
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