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Re: [Z_Scale] Re: Reducing G Scale to Z Scale

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  • Reynard Wellman
    Hello Allan, I concur. I have a few 1:20.3 kits that I have not had the time to put together yet.They are beautiful. One day, when I inherit a couple of spare
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 1 8:25 PM
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      Hello Allan,
      I concur. I have a few 1:20.3 kits that I have not
      had the time to put together yet.They are beautiful.
      One day, when I inherit a couple of spare acres, I may
      get more involved in this incredibly pleasant
      scale. The other large scales do not have as many
      cottage industry craftsmen designing rolling stock as you
      find in 1:20.3 scale.

      Reynard
      http://www.micronart.com
      On Mar 1, 2007, at 2:46 PM, Allan Miller wrote:

      > Just a minor correction to what has been posted: There is no 1:20.5
      > scale. It's 1:20.3, which is the correct scale for modeling U.S.
      > three-foot narrow gauge on 45mm track. Along with 1:29 (the scale
      > "created" by Aristo-Craft), 1:20.3 is probably the most popular of the
      > various Large Scales among U.S. modelers. Not necessarily true in
      > other parts of the planet.
      >
      > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "grblaser" <grblaser@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, saundebn@ wrote:
      > > >
      > > > It depends on which G-scale you are actually referring to ...
      > there are many: 1:20.5,
      > > 1:22.5, 1:24, 1:29, and 1:32 to name the ones that I know about.
      > Also, is this for scaling
      > > a model or a layout? Direct scaling of a layout isn't always
      > advisable.
      > > >
      > > > Brad
      > >
      > >
      > > To figure it out depending on the scale as mentioned in the email
      > above take the larger
      > > scale in this case 22.5 and divide it by the scale you want to go to
      > in this case 220
      > >
      > > 20.5/220=.0931818
      > > 22.5/220=.1022727
      > > 29/220=.131818
      > > 32/220=.1454545
      > > 87/220=.3954545 HO to Z scale
      > > 160/220=.7272727 N scale to Z scale
      > >
      > >
      > > etc, etc, etc.
      > >
      > > Good luck on what ever it is you are reducing.
      > >
      > > Gwyl B.
      > >
      >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Allan Miller
      I m not exactly sure what you re disagreeing with. Granted that most Large Scale buildings and accessories (but certainly not all) are built in 1:24 scale (not
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 2 2:33 AM
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        I'm not exactly sure what you're disagreeing with.

        Granted that most Large Scale buildings and accessories (but certainly
        not all) are built in 1:24 scale (not 1:25) for Large Scale so they
        can enjoy use in most all of the assorted scales, the trains
        themselves fall into specific scales--all designed for operation on a
        45mm track gauge.

        1:32 (MTH, Marklin, etc.) is the correct scale for modeling U.S.
        standard gauge prototypes on that track gauge; 1:20.3 (Bachmann,
        Accucraft, etc.) is the correct scale for modeling U.S. three-foot
        narrow gauge on that track gauge; and 1:22.5 (LGB) is the correct
        scale for modeling European meter gauge on that same track gauge. The
        other most popular scales in Large Scale include 1:24 (Hartland, etc.)
        and 1:29 (Aristo, USA Trains, etc.).

        Not sure what all of this has to do with Z, but we might as well have
        the correct scale definitions/applications used.

        --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Creighton Sr <bigtrain6@...> wrote:
        >
        > I Tend to disagree as most ascessories available including
        bldg,vehicles, people most G scalers even those using
        aristo,usa,bachman and of course LGB,gauge 1 Marklin is 1/25th as 1/32
        looks too small and most things available on the market are 1/25th in size
        >
      • de Champeaux Dominique
        Don t forget G deals with 1:22.5 when narrow gauge, still running on 45mm broad track. When dealing with standard gauge, on 45mm broad track, G is 1/29.5. So
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 2 5:07 AM
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          Don't forget G deals with 1:22.5 when narrow gauge,
          still running on 45mm broad track.

          When dealing with standard gauge, on 45mm broad track,
          G is 1/29.5.

          So in this last case the ratio is something like 1/9.5

          Dom




          --- Don Avila <d.f.avila@...> a écrit :

          > I wouldn't put my whole retirement on this, but
          > stuff I have picked up
          > along the way is G = 1:22.5






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        • Don Avila
          The real problem is how do you know that the “G” dimensions you are using are really properly scaled. After reading this whole thread it almost seems that
          Message 4 of 16 , Mar 2 5:23 AM
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            The real problem is how do you know that the “G” dimensions you are
            using are really properly scaled. After reading this whole thread it
            almost seems that “G” is in the eye of the beholder.

            Don


            -----Original Message-----
            From: z_scale@yahoogroups.com [mailto:z_scale@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
            Of de Champeaux Dominique
            Sent: Friday, March 02, 2007 8:07 AM
            To: z_scale@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE : RE: [Z_Scale] Reducing G Scale to Z Scale

            Don't forget G deals with 1:22.5 when narrow gauge,
            still running on 45mm broad track.

            When dealing with standard gauge, on 45mm broad track,
            G is 1/29.5.

            So in this last case the ratio is something like 1/9.5

            Dom

            --- Don Avila <d.f.avila@att. <mailto:d.f.avila%40att.net> net> a écrit
            :

            > I wouldn't put my whole retirement on this, but
            > stuff I have picked up
            > along the way is G = 1:22.5





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            questions !
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          • Lois & Carl Feyerherm
            John B. G scale varies in size from 1:22.5 to 1:29 depending on the brand however the track is identical (rail centers). Depending on what you plan to reduce
            Message 5 of 16 , Mar 2 10:33 PM
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              John B.

              G scale varies in size from 1:22.5 to 1:29 depending on the brand however the track is identical (rail centers). Depending on what you plan to reduce be sure you know what the ratio of the G scale is before you do any reducing.

              Carl
              In Nebraska in a blowing snow advisory or blizzard warning depending on how far west and south you are of the Missouri River



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Allan Borg
              Interesingly enough I seem to have seen somewhere that the individual scales in the G range have sometimes been divided into other reference designations
              Message 6 of 16 , Mar 3 4:13 PM
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                Interesingly enough I seem to have seen somewhere that the individual
                scales in the "G" range have sometimes been divided into other
                reference designations being G H I and J or was it F G H and I, while
                1/32 is Marklin's "1" gauge.
                Allan Borg

                >
                > John B.
                >
                > G scale varies in size from 1:22.5 to 1:29 depending on the brand
                however the track is identical (rail centers). Depending on what you
                plan to reduce be sure you know what the ratio of the G scale is before
                you do any reducing.
                >
                > Carl
                > In Nebraska in a blowing snow advisory or blizzard warning depending
                on how far west and south you are of the Missouri River
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • Allan Miller
                I believe that s true, although very few are using those designations. For one thing, it leads to extra effort and confusion on the part of the hobbyist
                Message 7 of 16 , Mar 4 3:00 AM
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                  I believe that's true, although very few are using those designations.
                  For one thing, it leads to extra effort and confusion on the part of
                  the hobbyist because it requires the individual to actually know what
                  scale the letters designate. "G" was relatively easy back when any
                  Large Scale trains were pretty much grouped under that designation (as
                  is Z and most other scales), but with the emergence of 1:20.3, 1:22.5,
                  1:24, 1:29, and 1:32 (among some others) as viable scales in their own
                  rite, going with letters just adds to the complexity.

                  For example, Z alone probably means nothing to most novices; you
                  pretty much have to expand on the designation every time you introduce
                  someone to the hobby by explaining that the models are 1:220 the size
                  of the prototype. Ditto for N, HO, S, O (and OO), etc. And then
                  there's the added explanations that are needed for Nn3, HOn3, On30,
                  and the like.

                  --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Allan Borg" <themohican2003@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Interesingly enough I seem to have seen somewhere that the individual
                  > scales in the "G" range have sometimes been divided into other
                  > reference designations being G H I and J or was it F G H and I, while
                  > 1/32 is Marklin's "1" gauge.
                  > Allan Borg
                  >
                  > >
                  > > John B.
                  > >
                  > > G scale varies in size from 1:22.5 to 1:29 depending on the brand
                  > however the track is identical (rail centers). Depending on what you
                  > plan to reduce be sure you know what the ratio of the G scale is before
                  > you do any reducing.
                  > >
                  > > Carl
                  > > In Nebraska in a blowing snow advisory or blizzard warning depending
                  > on how far west and south you are of the Missouri River
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >
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