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Code 40 or 55 for laying track etc.

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  • dgsteve@altavista.com
    I purchased some code 40 track today pre-weathered. It seems quite a bit smaller than the Marklin rail is it more prototypical?
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 30, 2001
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      I purchased some code 40 track today pre-weathered. It seems quite a
      bit smaller than the Marklin rail is it more prototypical?
    • jmac_han@hotmail.com
      Code 40 is much more prototypical than the foot high rail that Märklin track comes with. The problem with code 40 is flange clearance. Flanges on Z wheels
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 30, 2001
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        Code 40 is much more prototypical than the foot high rail that
        Märklin track comes with. The problem with code 40 is flange
        clearance. Flanges on Z wheels especially Märklin are pretty
        deep and may bottom out on hand laid code 40 track.

        Many Nn3 track hand layers use code 40 and I am thinking of
        using code 40 for my hand laid turnouts and crossing for the
        Civil Engineering requirements. I also have code 55 if I chicken
        out at the last minute!

        JRM

        --- In z_scale@y..., dgsteve@a... wrote:
        > I purchased some code 40 track today pre-weathered. It
        seems quite a
        > bit smaller than the Marklin rail is it more prototypical?
      • dgsteve@altavista.com
        Thanks Jeffery, I picked it up at $1.50 CDN for 36 length at Central hobbies in Vancouver. I had planned to use it as abandoned lines and rail stock piles but
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 30, 2001
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          Thanks Jeffery, I picked it up at $1.50 CDN for 36" length at Central
          hobbies in Vancouver. I had planned to use it as abandoned lines and
          rail stock piles but it's size in relation to Marklin track is quite
          a contrast. It may suit LRT or narrow Z in a Peco/Marklin track
          world. Great detail accessories anyways as the micro train flanges
          leave little room for error on laying it as functional track. I think
          I have already chickened out on the code 40 for now. :) Very delicate
          stuff.
          I'll get some 55 to make my first few scratch turnouts.
          --- In z_scale@y..., jmac_han@h... wrote:
          > Code 40 is much more prototypical than the foot high rail that
          > Märklin track comes with. The problem with code 40 is flange
          > clearance. Flanges on Z wheels especially Märklin are pretty
          > deep and may bottom out on hand laid code 40 track.
          >
          > Many Nn3 track hand layers use code 40 and I am thinking of
          > using code 40 for my hand laid turnouts and crossing for the
          > Civil Engineering requirements. I also have code 55 if I chicken
          > out at the last minute!
          >
          > JRM
          >
          > --- In z_scale@y..., dgsteve@a... wrote:
          > > I purchased some code 40 track today pre-weathered. It
          > seems quite a
          > > bit smaller than the Marklin rail is it more prototypical?
        • jmac_han@hotmail.com
          Hey Steve, you can use the code 40 cut into rail lengths for rail stacks, flat car loads and rails dropped off along the right of way. Cheers, Jeffrey ...
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 30, 2001
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            Hey Steve, you can use the code 40 cut into rail lengths for rail
            stacks, flat car loads and rails dropped off along the right of way.

            Cheers,
            Jeffrey

            --- In z_scale@y..., dgsteve@a... wrote:
            > Thanks Jeffery, I picked it up at $1.50 CDN for 36" length at
            Central
            > hobbies in Vancouver. I had planned to use it as abandoned
            lines and
            > rail stock piles but it's size in relation to Marklin track is quite
            > a contrast. It may suit LRT or narrow Z in a Peco/Marklin track
            > world. Great detail accessories anyways as the micro train
            flanges
            > leave little room for error on laying it as functional track. I think
            > I have already chickened out on the code 40 for now. :) Very
            delicate
            > stuff.
            > I'll get some 55 to make my first few scratch turnouts.
          • Reynard Wellman
            Absolutely. Code 40 is closer in scale to actual rail height and flange width. Also Micro-Trains flex track is more prototypical looking and you don t have to
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 30, 2001
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              Absolutely. Code 40 is closer in scale to actual rail height and flange
              width. Also Micro-Trains flex track is more prototypical looking and you
              don't have to lay all those thousands of ties for that. One caveat to be
              aware of when using code 40 is the flange depth on Marklin wheels, they'll
              fit alright but be sure your track laying is well aligned in all X,Y and Z
              axis. You'll be astonished at the beauty of well laid code 40 track.
              Pre-weathered sounds very nice as well. I paint all my track with Floquill
              "Rail Brown" and then sand it off to expose the conductive surface.

              Good luck and let us see a photo of your trackwork when you've got
              something.

              Regards, Reynard
              on 06/30/2001 8:28 PM, dgsteve@... at dgsteve@... wrote:

              I purchased some code 40 track today pre-weathered. It seems quite a
              bit smaller than the Marklin rail is it more prototypical?


              "Z" WARNING! HANDLE WITH CARE! Highly addictive in Small DoseZ!


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