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Re: Weathering wood box car

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  • Lionel Gazeau
    Russ Apply a VERY thin wash of grimy black, this will bring out the details and each board will be visible. I use acrylics. this might be all you need. If you
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 2, 2006
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      Russ

      Apply a VERY thin wash of grimy black, this will bring out the details
      and each board will be visible. I use acrylics. this might be all you
      need.

      If you want you can first take a boxcar red or a paint that is close
      to the original color and add a little bit of white or yellow to make
      it look like faded paint, dry brush the car with that, especially the
      bottom portion, then a thin wash of grimy black.

      Apply rust to the metal parts including the trucks but not the
      journals or wheels which would be oily greasy black.

      You'll find several examples of car weathering in my website including
      some nicely done cars by Robert Ray. I am also planning articles for
      Ztrack on just this subject.

      Lionel

      http://theotherlionel.com
    • Russ Meier
      Lionel, Out of curiosity -- what wash ratio do you use for your paints? And do you use alcohol or water to dilute? Russ Meier Milwaukee, WI MILW, UP, and CP
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 2, 2006
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        Lionel,

        Out of curiosity -- what wash ratio do you use for your paints? And do you use alcohol or
        water to dilute?

        Russ Meier
        Milwaukee, WI
        MILW, UP, and CP in Z.


        --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Lionel Gazeau" <zeelionel@...> wrote:
        >
        > Russ
        >
        > Apply a VERY thin wash of grimy black, this will bring out the details
        > and each board will be visible. I use acrylics. this might be all you
        > need.
        >
        > If you want you can first take a boxcar red or a paint that is close
        > to the original color and add a little bit of white or yellow to make
        > it look like faded paint, dry brush the car with that, especially the
        > bottom portion, then a thin wash of grimy black.
        >
        > Apply rust to the metal parts including the trucks but not the
        > journals or wheels which would be oily greasy black.
        >
        > You'll find several examples of car weathering in my website including
        > some nicely done cars by Robert Ray. I am also planning articles for
        > Ztrack on just this subject.
        >
        > Lionel
        >
        > http://theotherlionel.com
        >
      • Lionel Gazeau
        Russ My off-line email should have answered that but for the benefit of others: For a wash I use one drop of paint to six drops of water to which I add a tiny
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 2, 2006
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          Russ

          My off-line email should have answered that but for the benefit of others:

          For a wash I use one drop of paint to six drops of water to which I
          add a tiny tiny sliver of soap. You can also cut the water with a few
          of drops of alcohol, or, believe it or not, Future Floor Wax works too.

          I guess it depends on the effect you are trying to achieve. A very
          thin wash will only stain depressed ares like between boards, a
          thicker wash will do the same but will stain the rest of the car too.
          The good thing about acrylics is you can just wipe or rinse off what
          you don't like.

          Lionel

          http://theotherlionel.com



          --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Russ Meier" <agentink_and_zfan@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Lionel,
          >
          > Out of curiosity -- what wash ratio do you use for your paints? And
          do you use alcohol or
          > water to dilute?
          >
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