Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

What Is This Style / Technique?

Expand Messages
  • jcubbin@optonline.net
    In the April 2001 issue of Model Railroader on page 72 there is a photo of some trestle work. I m interested in the track pictured in the foreground. It
    Message 1 of 3 , May 2, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      In the April 2001 issue of Model Railroader on page 72 there is a photo
      of some trestle work. I'm interested in the track pictured in the
      foreground. It appears that between the rails the ties have been
      covered over by wood or ?

      I'm familar with this look where track intersects a road and the
      pavement / road material covers the ties to provide a uniform surface
      for the road, but why would it be done here?

      John
    • zscale@retrograde.net
      Hello, John. I can t personally answer your question (yet), but here are some pictures that might interest you. In the Z_Scale list s Files section, I ve
      Message 2 of 3 , May 3, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello, John.

        I can't personally answer your question (yet), but here are some
        pictures that might interest you.

        In the Z_Scale list's "Files" section, I've posted a couple old
        pictures of the B&O bridge over the Potomac River at Harpers Ferry,
        West Virginia. You can find them in the "Pics" folder as
        HarpersBridge1 and HarpersBridge2, or use the following URLs.

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/z_scale/files/Pics/HarpersBridge1.jpg

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/z_scale/files/Pics/HarpersBridge2.jpg

        These pictures were taken years ago, but this bridge and the other
        bridge visible to the right still exist and are used heavily. A
        number of railroad bridges have been constructed and re-constructed
        at Harpers Ferry over the last 150 years, and in old photos several
        appear to have planking beside and/or between the rails. I can't say
        exactly why, but it may be to accomodate foot and vehicle traffic
        over the bridges for maintenance purposes. Unless one crosses one of
        these railroad bridges, one must travel four or five miles and cross
        two rivers to get to the opposite bank, so it would make sense to
        have a pedestrian- or truck-friendly bridge deck for maintenance
        crews.

        I was fortunate enough to have a chance to visit Harpers Ferry last
        week while on vacation. I'll take a look at my photographs to see if
        the plankwork is still there. Unfortunately it would be hard to get a
        close-up shot of the bridge deck itself nowadays without doing some
        serious trespassing. :-(

        I picked up a book on the bridges and transport-related construction
        at Harpers Ferry through the years, but haven't had a chance to take
        a good look at it yet. If I find any useful details about the planked
        bridge decks, I'll let you know.

        Cheers

        -- Andy Hunting

        > In the April 2001 issue of Model Railroader on page 72 there is a
        photo
        > of some trestle work. I'm interested in the track pictured in the
        > foreground. It appears that between the rails the ties have been
        > covered over by wood or ?
        >
        > I'm familar with this look where track intersects a road and the
        > pavement / road material covers the ties to provide a uniform
        surface
        > for the road, but why would it be done here?
        >
        > John
      • jcubbin@optonline.net
        Andy, The foot and vehicle traffic does make sense. I ve also seen this on very short sections although I m not sure that matters. The reason I was asking is
        Message 3 of 3 , May 4, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          Andy,

          The foot and vehicle traffic does make sense. I've also seen this on
          very short sections although I'm not sure that matters.

          The reason I was asking is that due to some damaged ties on a short,
          elevated (sans sub-roadbed) section of my track I decided to try
          something different and thought this idea might work well.

          I wonder what would be a good material to use for this look. Originally
          I considered bass wood strips, but given the tight tolerances under the
          train I would not want the temp/humidity raising any strips. I suppose
          styrene etched and painted would work also.

          Any idea on what material is used when a pavement or concrete look is
          desired?

          Thanks
          John
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.