Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: attn: Rob Kluz, now attn: Ole

Expand Messages
  • BJKRONEN@xxx.xxx
    Ole Rosted: Before you get ME Roasted, I must offer some clairifications. ... Now I didn t ever say that Marklin turnouts were lousy . They are mass-produced
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 5, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      Ole Rosted:

      Before you get ME Roasted, I must offer some clairifications.

      > I have come to this conclusion too. It is not the rolling stock! All
      > evil is coming from the tracks. Turnouts in particular. They are a
      > complete disaster, but I guess that Bill Kronenberger is right, when
      > he suggests, that lousy construction lends itself to mass production.

      Now I didn't ever say that Marklin turnouts were "lousy". They are
      mass-produced just like Atlas/Peco (and others) in N & HO scales. Same dead
      frogs and the usual Scratch-and-Pray electrical circuits.

      What I did say, is that you need to put the obvious short comings on your
      routine cleaning duties list.

      1. It only takes a second to wipe all the surfaces on a turnout down with
      alcholol, and to give the electrical S&P junctions a short shot of TV tuner
      cleaner if they need it.

      2. A visual inspection takes another 30 seconds with those glasses you own
      that look like the bottoms of coke bottles.

      3. Not a big deal. But if you let it go for a number of months, it becomes
      a big deal for running trains. You'll spend more time than that doing the
      periodic cleaning of the non-turnout track. In any scale.

      > Nothing much. Smooth running of 0-6-0s even at loooow speed on *all*
      > tracks - turnouts and crossings included.

      Suggestion #1: Run your finger over each rail on your entire layout. If you
      can feel a lump, bump, or sharp anything with your index finger, so will the
      train. Fix it. Run your finger over it again.

      Suggestion #2: Get a track guage. MicroTrains sells one, BLW sells one (for
      Nn3), and there may be others. You will be surprised how fast your track can
      get out of gauge, usually in the "too narrow" direction. When this happens,
      the trains will be lifted up off the rails as their flanges get caught in the
      "pinch". Not only does this invite derailments, it is not good for
      electrical connections either.

      Suggestion #3: Do not assume that just because Z locos and cars can
      negotiate small curves in the horizontal plane, that they are able to
      negotiate sharp radius curves in the verticle plane. Look at your trackwork
      from the side. It your track "puckers up" at joints, or you have bent it
      over the top of a mountain or down in a valley, you are a prime candidate for
      G scale due to fustration in any small scale.
      Try to maintain something like a 8 inch / 20cm curve in the verticle,
      minimum. On second thought, don't bother to measure it. If you can SEE it,
      its too much. Same rules apply to 1:1 trains.

      PS - Your rail joiners left Houston today. We will all expect a complete
      analysis on Marklin versus Peco rail joiners in a week or so. <grin>

      Bill Kronenberger
      Houston
    • Ole.Rosted@xxxxxxx.xxxxxxxxxxxxxx)
      On Tue, 5 Oct 1999 21:16:45 EDT, you wrote: ... I am very, very sorry that I inadvertenly expressed myself in a manner, that could leave the groupmembers with
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 6, 1999
      • 0 Attachment
        On Tue, 5 Oct 1999 21:16:45 EDT, you wrote:

        Bill:

        >Now I didn't ever say that Marklin turnouts were "lousy". They are
        >mass-produced just like Atlas/Peco (and others) in N & HO scales. Same dead
        >frogs and the usual Scratch-and-Pray electrical circuits.

        I am very, very sorry that I inadvertenly expressed myself in a
        manner, that could leave the groupmembers with the impression
        that *you* had called the M turnouts lousy

        You didn't call Marklin tracks lousy! I did! - and I mean it!

        I a letter to this group I have said, that I don't mind using money on
        the Z hobby, but it makes me mad, to buy expensive gear that later -
        when put to use - fails completely.
        M parts are rather expensive, but I wouldn't mind paying 2, 3 or 4
        times as much for items of *indisputable* quality. Rather that, than
        be wasting my money on mere toys!

        [cleaning tracks]

        I do clean my tracks as you suggest. My problems are no longer coming
        from dirty tracks! (at least not all of them :-) ) Problems are
        related to mechanical mismatches around the track: rails that do not
        join close even if the little claws are engaged fully, rounded
        "shoulders" on rail-ends etc. I will use soldered rails whereever
        possible in the future. (and then there are the turnouts :-( )

        >Suggestion #2: Get a track guage. MicroTrains sells one, BLW sells one (for
        >Nn3), and there may be others. You will be surprised how fast your track can
        >get out of gauge, usually in the "too narrow" direction. When this happens,
        >the trains will be lifted up off the rails as their flanges get caught in the
        >"pinch". Not only does this invite derailments, it is not good for
        >electrical connections either.

        I was not aware of this situation, but I will get myself a track gauge
        next time I visit my Z-store - or I will order one.

        >Suggestion #3: Do not assume that just because Z locos and cars can
        >negotiate small curves in the horizontal plane, that they are able to
        >negotiate sharp radius curves in the verticle plane.

        The only places where my tracklayout is not horizontally plane are
        where my turning loop (running 40 mm (2") diagonally above the main
        layout) lands on the main track level.
        Though not very steep I consider the landings to be "danger zones" and
        awaits the time, where my skills have developed to a degree where it
        will be possible for me to curve a flextrack both in the horizontal
        plane and the vertical as well - without destroying rails and tiers.
        Or I could change my layout (once more) to allow for longer straight
        landings with only minor vertical (and no horizontal) curvature.

        >PS - Your rail joiners left Houston today. We will all expect a complete
        >analysis on Marklin versus Peco rail joiners in a week or so. <grin>

        Thank you!! I'm looking forward to get them as I have given up working
        with flextracks using M rail joiners. Thank you for your - as allways
        good - advise!

        regards Ole Rosted, Denmark
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.