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Benchwork for the NYC & HRRR, Western Branch, circa 1880-1890s

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  • John Bartolotto
    Well I finally did it. I started my layout by completing the benchwork last night of the future New York Central and Hudson River Railroad, Western Branch,
    Message 1 of 14 , Oct 2, 2005
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      Well I finally did it. I started my layout by completing the
      benchwork last night of the future New York Central and Hudson River
      Railroad, Western Branch, circa 1880-1890s.

      For the benchwork I use two Woodland Scenic corner module 3' x 3'
      kits (ST4791) and one straight module kit (ST4790) 1 1/2' x 3'. The
      benchwork is 9' long and is shaped like a dog-bone. Photo is in the
      Photo section titled New Bartolotto Layout. I will post more photos
      as I proceed with the layout.

      The total assembly time putting the Woodland Scenic modules together
      was 3 hours (that's with taking my time to make sure I assembled
      them correctly, numerous interruptions and some minor modifications
      to make them to my liking). They are extremely sturdy and can be
      disassembled (which in my line of work comes in handy with moving
      every 1 to 3 years). I highly recommend these to anyone who wants
      to build benchwork quickly and does not like to do a lot of
      measuring, cutting and wood-buying.

      John Bartolotto
    • Loren Snyder
      John, I just looked at your new module picture on the forum and I m concerned that giant Dearzilla will eat all of your vegetation Loren [Non-text portions of
      Message 2 of 14 , Oct 2, 2005
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        John,

        I just looked at your new module picture on the forum and I'm concerned that
        giant Dearzilla will eat all of your vegetation

        Loren

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Allan Miller
        That benchwork looks great, John! I had no idea that WS offered benchwork kits. I ve seen their scenic modules, etc., but didn t realize that they also
        Message 3 of 14 , Oct 2, 2005
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          That benchwork looks great, John! I had no idea that WS offered
          benchwork kits. I've seen their scenic modules, etc., but didn't
          realize that they also offered the supporting benchwork. Living in an
          apartment, at present, it's something worth looking into.

          I have several boxes of Mianne benchwork that are still sealed and
          stored. I plan to use them for a larger On30 pike at some point, and
          don't really want to make use of the components until after I get a
          larger residence. The WS components appear to be just what I might
          need for a decent Z scale layout, so I'll have to explore that a bit more.

          The era you're modeling is also pretty the era I'm interest in
          pursuing. I have the period items that Marklin has released to date,
          and am just hoping they (or someone else) will have more offerings in
          the years to come.

          I also have a lot of the more contemporary stuff, as well, but will
          likely be thinning that collection a bit at some point in the near
          future since I have items representing too many roads and eras, and
          really prefer to focus on a theme.

          Please keep us up-to-date as work on your new layout progresses!



          --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "John Bartolotto" <jsbart@p...> wrote:
          > Well I finally did it. I started my layout by completing the
          > benchwork last night of the future New York Central and Hudson River
          > Railroad, Western Branch, circa 1880-1890s.
          >
          > For the benchwork I use two Woodland Scenic corner module 3' x 3'
          > kits (ST4791) and one straight module kit (ST4790) 1 1/2' x 3'. The
          > benchwork is 9' long and is shaped like a dog-bone. Photo is in the
          > Photo section titled New Bartolotto Layout. I will post more photos
          > as I proceed with the layout.
          >
          > The total assembly time putting the Woodland Scenic modules together
          > was 3 hours (that's with taking my time to make sure I assembled
          > them correctly, numerous interruptions and some minor modifications
          > to make them to my liking). They are extremely sturdy and can be
          > disassembled (which in my line of work comes in handy with moving
          > every 1 to 3 years). I highly recommend these to anyone who wants
          > to build benchwork quickly and does not like to do a lot of
          > measuring, cutting and wood-buying.
          >
          > John Bartolotto
        • John & Sue Bartolotto
          Loren, Yes, by Woodland Scenics. I haven t decided what approach to take on the next part of the layout, whether I will cut the wood and lay it and the foam
          Message 4 of 14 , Oct 2, 2005
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            Loren,

            Yes, by Woodland Scenics. I haven't decided what approach to take on the
            next part of the layout, whether I will cut the wood and lay it and the foam
            board myself or use one ST4801 - Mod-U-Rail System - Straight Module Kit
            (18"x36") and two ST4802 - Mod-U-Rail System - Corner Module Kits (36"x36").
            I might just go the next step by myself because there are a lot of
            components in both module kits that I will not use and for $124.98 and
            $149.98 respectively that puts me at $425.00 total for just the next step of
            the layout and I think I can build the next part by myself cheaper than
            that.

            I have the make the top of the layout removable and light so that I can
            securely box the 3 sections when I move again.

            John
          • John & Sue Bartolotto
            Allan, I am also getting ready to thin my collection over the next few months on that auction web site that we can t mention. Check out the Nn2 scale
            Message 5 of 14 , Oct 2, 2005
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              Allan,

              I am also getting ready to thin my collection over the next few months on
              that auction web site that we can't mention.

              Check out the Nn2 scale manufacturer Republic Locomotive Works
              http://www.republiclocomotiveworks.com/ They have an enormous amount of
              items that fit our era that with a little modification can be used in Z
              scale. The cabs on their locos are too large for Z but if you kitbash on of
              their loco kits with either a cab from the Marklin 81419 Casey Jones loco or
              from the 88035 D&RGW loco then you'll increase your late 1800's loco roster
              considerably (which is a project I am working on now).

              John
            • randy smidt
              John, I ve been waiting for someone to try using these Woodland Scenics modules for Z scale and develop a whole new modular standard around it. BUT, wow! I
              Message 6 of 14 , Oct 2, 2005
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                John,

                I've been waiting for someone to try using these Woodland Scenics modules for Z scale and develop a whole new modular standard around it. BUT, wow! I didn't realize how expensive the pieces are.

                I think the wood benchwork is the easiest and least expensive part to making modules for me. I still have 4 more completed module frames that I built 1 to 2 years ago but haven't made the time to finish yet. Some of that is because I know that the easy part is already done.

                But then again, designing something that will withstand the kind of frequent relocation you have to go through is a whole 'nother matter.

                Take Care,
                Randy Smidt

                John & Sue Bartolotto <jsbart@...> wrote:
                Loren,

                Yes, by Woodland Scenics. I haven't decided what approach to take on the
                next part of the layout, whether I will cut the wood and lay it and the foam
                board myself or use one ST4801 - Mod-U-Rail System - Straight Module Kit
                (18"x36") and two ST4802 - Mod-U-Rail System - Corner Module Kits (36"x36").
                I might just go the next step by myself because there are a lot of
                components in both module kits that I will not use and for $124.98 and
                $149.98 respectively that puts me at $425.00 total for just the next step of
                the layout and I think I can build the next part by myself cheaper than
                that.

                I have the make the top of the layout removable and light so that I can
                securely box the 3 sections when I move again.

                John






                -Z- WARNING! HANDLE WITH CARE! Highly addictive in Small DoseZ!

                Yahoo! Groups Links









                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Tom Gilchrist
                I ll be interested in how it goes and some photos along the way. BTW, how high did you make the modules? Thanks, tomg www.tomgtomg.com/z
                Message 7 of 14 , Oct 2, 2005
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                  I'll be interested in how it goes and some photos along the way. BTW, how high did you
                  make the modules?

                  Thanks, tomg
                  www.tomgtomg.com/z



                  --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "John Bartolotto" <jsbart@p...> wrote:
                  > Well I finally did it. I started my layout by completing the
                  > benchwork last night of the future New York Central and Hudson River
                  > Railroad, Western Branch, circa 1880-1890s.
                  >
                  > For the benchwork I use two Woodland Scenic corner module 3' x 3'
                  > kits (ST4791) and one straight module kit (ST4790) 1 1/2' x 3'. The
                  > benchwork is 9' long and is shaped like a dog-bone. Photo is in the
                  > Photo section titled New Bartolotto Layout. I will post more photos
                  > as I proceed with the layout.
                  >
                  > The total assembly time putting the Woodland Scenic modules together
                  > was 3 hours (that's with taking my time to make sure I assembled
                  > them correctly, numerous interruptions and some minor modifications
                  > to make them to my liking). They are extremely sturdy and can be
                  > disassembled (which in my line of work comes in handy with moving
                  > every 1 to 3 years). I highly recommend these to anyone who wants
                  > to build benchwork quickly and does not like to do a lot of
                  > measuring, cutting and wood-buying.
                  >
                  > John Bartolotto
                • John Bartolotto
                  Tom, The modules come pre-set at a height of 35 1/2 and each leg has a screw type foot in it so you can level the benchwork if required. John
                  Message 8 of 14 , Oct 3, 2005
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                    Tom,

                    The modules come pre-set at a height of 35 1/2" and each leg has a
                    screw type foot in it so you can level the benchwork if required.

                    John
                  • Larry Card
                    ... coff coff (Nn3) coff coff V/R Larry P. Card Franklinton NC
                    Message 9 of 14 , Oct 3, 2005
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                      >Check out the Nn2 scale manufacturer Republic Locomotive Works

                      coff coff (Nn3) coff coff
                      V/R
                      Larry P. Card
                      Franklinton NC
                    • John Bartolotto
                      Larry, Thanks, my mistake, slip of the finer on the keyboard! You might want to see a doctor about that cough also. John
                      Message 10 of 14 , Oct 3, 2005
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                        Larry,

                        Thanks, my mistake, slip of the finer on the keyboard! You might want
                        to see a doctor about that cough also.

                        John

                        --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Larry Card" <lpcard@h...> wrote:
                        > >Check out the Nn2 scale manufacturer Republic Locomotive Works
                        >
                        > coff coff (Nn3) coff coff
                        > V/R
                        > Larry P. Card
                        > Franklinton NC
                      • Tom Fisher
                        1. From what kind of wood (solid vs ply; softwood vs. hard) is the benchwork made? 2. How are the pieces attached to one another? ...
                        Message 11 of 14 , Oct 3, 2005
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                          1. From what kind of wood (solid vs ply; softwood vs.
                          hard) is the benchwork made?

                          2. How are the pieces attached to one another?


                          --- Tom Gilchrist <tomg@...> wrote:

                          > I'll be interested in how it goes and some photos
                          > along the way. BTW, how high did you
                          > make the modules?
                          >
                          > Thanks, tomg
                          > www.tomgtomg.com/z
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "John Bartolotto"
                          > <jsbart@p...> wrote:
                          > > Well I finally did it. I started my layout by
                          > completing the
                          > > benchwork last night of the future New York
                          > Central and Hudson River
                          > > Railroad, Western Branch, circa 1880-1890s.
                          > >
                          > > For the benchwork I use two Woodland Scenic corner
                          > module 3' x 3'
                          > > kits (ST4791) and one straight module kit (ST4790)
                          > 1 1/2' x 3'. The
                          > > benchwork is 9' long and is shaped like a
                          > dog-bone. Photo is in the
                          > > Photo section titled New Bartolotto Layout. I
                          > will post more photos
                          > > as I proceed with the layout.
                          > >
                          > > The total assembly time putting the Woodland
                          > Scenic modules together
                          > > was 3 hours (that's with taking my time to make
                          > sure I assembled
                          > > them correctly, numerous interruptions and some
                          > minor modifications
                          > > to make them to my liking). They are extremely
                          > sturdy and can be
                          > > disassembled (which in my line of work comes in
                          > handy with moving
                          > > every 1 to 3 years). I highly recommend these to
                          > anyone who wants
                          > > to build benchwork quickly and does not like to do
                          > a lot of
                          > > measuring, cutting and wood-buying.
                          > >
                          > > John Bartolotto
                          >
                          >
                          >





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                        • John & Sue Bartolotto
                          Tom, 1. From what kind of wood (solid vs ply; softwood vs. hard) is the benchwork made? A: The legs are made of semi-hard pine and the side braces from hard
                          Message 12 of 14 , Oct 3, 2005
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                            Tom,

                            1. From what kind of wood (solid vs ply; softwood vs. hard) is the
                            benchwork made? A: The legs are made of semi-hard pine and the side braces
                            from hard press-wood.

                            2. How are the pieces attached to one another? A: The legs and side braces
                            are screwed together and then the modules are bolted together through
                            pre-drilled holes with bolts, washers and wing-nuts. Screws, bolts, washers
                            and wing-nuts are all provided.

                            The entire thing is VERY sturdy.

                            John
                          • randy smidt
                            John, What are the module bases made from? It isn t clear on the Woodland Scenics site. Also, how do the bases bolt together? From their website it looks
                            Message 13 of 14 , Oct 3, 2005
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                              John,

                              What are the module bases made from? It isn't clear on the Woodland Scenics site.

                              Also, how do the bases bolt together? From their website it looks like the bolts go through the module bases vertically to a connector tie plate underneath rather than going through end pieces horizontally like on standard module construction.

                              Thanks,
                              Randy Smidt

                              John & Sue Bartolotto <jsbart@...> wrote:
                              Tom,

                              1. From what kind of wood (solid vs ply; softwood vs. hard) is the
                              benchwork made? A: The legs are made of semi-hard pine and the side braces
                              from hard press-wood.

                              2. How are the pieces attached to one another? A: The legs and side braces
                              are screwed together and then the modules are bolted together through
                              pre-drilled holes with bolts, washers and wing-nuts. Screws, bolts, washers
                              and wing-nuts are all provided.

                              The entire thing is VERY sturdy.

                              John





                              -Z- WARNING! HANDLE WITH CARE! Highly addictive in Small DoseZ!

                              Yahoo! Groups Links








                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • John & Sue Bartolotto
                              Randy, The module bases are made from plywood and then the different WS components added as the modeler desires. I m not sure how the module bases bolt
                              Message 14 of 14 , Oct 3, 2005
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                                Randy,

                                The module bases are made from plywood and then the different WS components
                                added as the modeler desires.

                                I'm not sure how the module bases bolt together? Personally I will not be
                                bolting them together with anything fancy, just something to tie them
                                together, provide stability and is quick and easy to disassemble when I move
                                again.

                                John
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