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Re: [Z_Scale] Re: Z locomotives and cars from Japan

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  • Robert Toole
    Gee Ben, I thought that it was primarly Switzerland that used meter guage. After reading your posting and looking of old photo that I took back in the 60 s
    Message 1 of 14 , Jun 1, 2005
      Gee Ben,
      I thought that it was primarly Switzerland that used
      meter guage. After reading your posting and looking
      of old photo that I took back in the 60's during the
      Vietnam Era, I was staioned at Bangkok and remember
      ridding the trains on my days off. I didn't realize
      that that track was meter guage, I was more interested
      in taking pictures of the steam engines that they were
      still running and the "Kings Train" that was kept on
      the siding beside the main depot in Bangkok.
      Robert

      --- bscaro <bscaro@...> wrote:

      > Hi Dan, I'm aware of the scale being larger, it's
      > often 1:150 or even
      > 1:140.
      >
      > I think the reason was the same as the British - eg
      > a need to fit the
      > motors available when N scale started into the
      > prototypically smaller
      > Japanese loco bodies - given modern narrow gauge
      > locos are typically
      > 75% of the size of standard gauge in real life.
      >
      > Here's a metre gauge Thai diesel with a BN GE unit
      > to show the
      > comparison:
      >
      > http://www.locopage.net/rsr-4523.jpg
      >
      > However, these days smaller mechanisms are available
      > and so there's
      > no need to up the scale.
      >
      > And given Nn3 is established as regards standards,
      > gauge, etc, 1:160
      > on Z gauge track - scaling to 3'4" gauge - would
      > make Nn3 a suitable
      > scale for Japanese 3'6" modelling - and provide a
      > lot of useful Z
      > gauge bits and pieces as a side issue !
      >
      > Not to mention it would give a kickstart to
      > modelling in the many
      > countries that use either 3', metre or 3'6" as their
      > gauge.
      >
      > That includes lots of Central and South America, all
      > SE Asian
      > countries, Japan, Taiwan, a fair whack of India,
      > about half of
      > Australia, all of New Zealand and far and away the
      > majority of
      > Africa.
      >
      > Ben
      >
      >
      > > Ben,
      > > I believe that is why the Japanese use different
      > scales. In order
      > to use the
      > > same guage track as everyone else, they had to
      > shift the scaling of
      > Japanese
      > > prototype models. Their prototype rail spacing is
      > narrower than
      > ours.
      > > Dan S
      > >
      > > In a message dated 5/31/2005 8:05:42 AM Eastern
      > Daylight Time,
      > > bscaro@y... writes:
      > > Hi all
      > >
      > > It is kind of odd that the Japanese don't use the
      > combination
      > > available these days of N scale and Z track -Nn3,
      > or Nn3.5 in this
      > > case - to model Japanese trains on 3'6" - which
      > would be most
      > > prototypical of all, and which would probably not
      > require fiddling
      > > about with scale.
      > >
      > > Cheers
      > >
      > > Ben
      > >
      > >
      > > Considering everything in Japan is
      > > > a bit smaller (including the Cape gauge of 1067
      > mm) Japanese Z
      > with
      > > 1/200
      > > > appears a bit more tiny than regular European
      > and American Z of
      > > 1/220!!!
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
      > removed]
      >
      >
      >


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    • Robert Toole
      Oh, I forgot, I didn t get the opportunity to ride from Bangkok to Singapore on the train, bummer. Robert ... __________________________________ Discover
      Message 2 of 14 , Jun 1, 2005
        Oh, I forgot, I didn't get the opportunity to ride
        from Bangkok to Singapore on the train, bummer.
        Robert

        --- bscaro <bscaro@...> wrote:

        > Hi Dan, I'm aware of the scale being larger, it's
        > often 1:150 or even
        > 1:140.
        >
        > I think the reason was the same as the British - eg
        > a need to fit the
        > motors available when N scale started into the
        > prototypically smaller
        > Japanese loco bodies - given modern narrow gauge
        > locos are typically
        > 75% of the size of standard gauge in real life.
        >
        > Here's a metre gauge Thai diesel with a BN GE unit
        > to show the
        > comparison:
        >
        > http://www.locopage.net/rsr-4523.jpg
        >
        > However, these days smaller mechanisms are available
        > and so there's
        > no need to up the scale.
        >
        > And given Nn3 is established as regards standards,
        > gauge, etc, 1:160
        > on Z gauge track - scaling to 3'4" gauge - would
        > make Nn3 a suitable
        > scale for Japanese 3'6" modelling - and provide a
        > lot of useful Z
        > gauge bits and pieces as a side issue !
        >
        > Not to mention it would give a kickstart to
        > modelling in the many
        > countries that use either 3', metre or 3'6" as their
        > gauge.
        >
        > That includes lots of Central and South America, all
        > SE Asian
        > countries, Japan, Taiwan, a fair whack of India,
        > about half of
        > Australia, all of New Zealand and far and away the
        > majority of
        > Africa.
        >
        > Ben
        >
        >
        > > Ben,
        > > I believe that is why the Japanese use different
        > scales. In order
        > to use the
        > > same guage track as everyone else, they had to
        > shift the scaling of
        > Japanese
        > > prototype models. Their prototype rail spacing is
        > narrower than
        > ours.
        > > Dan S
        > >
        > > In a message dated 5/31/2005 8:05:42 AM Eastern
        > Daylight Time,
        > > bscaro@y... writes:
        > > Hi all
        > >
        > > It is kind of odd that the Japanese don't use the
        > combination
        > > available these days of N scale and Z track -Nn3,
        > or Nn3.5 in this
        > > case - to model Japanese trains on 3'6" - which
        > would be most
        > > prototypical of all, and which would probably not
        > require fiddling
        > > about with scale.
        > >
        > > Cheers
        > >
        > > Ben
        > >
        > >
        > > Considering everything in Japan is
        > > > a bit smaller (including the Cape gauge of 1067
        > mm) Japanese Z
        > with
        > > 1/200
        > > > appears a bit more tiny than regular European
        > and American Z of
        > > 1/220!!!
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
        > removed]
        >
        >
        >




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