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Trestle Wrestling/Truss Fussing

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  • johnegert
    Some months ago, I threatened to write another crackpot review of the Black Bear Construction Co. kits and building jigs used to create z scale wood bridges
    Message 1 of 8 , May 30, 2005
      Some months ago, I threatened to write another crackpot review of
      the Black Bear Construction Co. kits and building jigs used to create
      z scale wood bridges once I had actually finished one, so here goes...
      A call to Mike Barrett and a plea for him to give it to me in baby
      talk, yielded a boxload of tiny basswood strips, two plastic jigs for
      z scale trestle bents, and a deck bridge kit in n scale which I hoped
      could be adapted as a center section for a large z scale curved
      trestle. I decided to build a straight trestle first to get some
      experience and began to make bents of various heights. The plastic
      jigs make this process quite simple, and relentlessly accurate. I
      made 14 bents in various sizes ranging from 6" down to 1" in a rather
      short time using my NWSL Chopper to mass produce as many sizes as
      possible. Once my stack of bents was complete, I laid them out on the
      long stringers, and used pieces of longitudinal bracing to glue
      everything in place. The hardest part of the job was then to finish
      that bracing, and to add cross bracing.
      I cannot imagine how anyone could build such a bridge without jigs
      and retain a shred of sanity. The Black Bear box also contained a
      very nice stack of instructions and booklets which, combined with the
      Kalmbach Bridge book, will tell you more than you wanted to know
      about this interesting subject.
      A few idle observations--- If you are planning a grandiose
      creation, buy more wood than you can ever imagine using.... building
      a trestle eats up more wood than a family of termites-Barrett will
      help you here. If you're in a hurry, buy as many jigs as you can
      afford to speed the bent creation process. The aforementioned Chopper
      is very helpful, but not really necessary. Prepare to learn a lot
      about structural principles-- though no bridge body wood size is over
      1/16" square, the finished product is startlingly strong. Expect
      friends and family to question your sanity when viewing the finished
      product....
      I highly recommend Black Bear's stuff. It makes a fiendishly
      complex project quite simple and relatively fast. Barrett is a good
      guy to talk to--- check his website at www.blackbearcc.com
      As always, I have no connection to the company, etc., etc.
      john
    • Loren Snyder
      Subject: [Z_Scale] Trestle Wrestling/Truss Fussing ... John, Thank you for the fine report on Black Bear. I ve had that site marked for a long time now,
      Message 2 of 8 , May 30, 2005
        Subject: [Z_Scale] Trestle Wrestling/Truss Fussing


        > Some months ago, I threatened to write another crackpot review of
        > the Black Bear Construction Co. kits and building jigs used to create
        > z scale wood bridges once> I highly recommend Black Bear's stuff. It
        > makes a fiendishly
        > complex project quite simple and relatively fast. Barrett is a good
        > guy to talk to--- check his website at www.blackbearcc.com
        > As always, I have no connection to the company, etc., etc.
        > john


        John, Thank you for the fine report on Black Bear. I've had that site
        marked for a long time now, knowing that someday I'd have to buy that boat
        load of wood for such a project.

        I believe several members of CZM will be building bridges for their modules,
        (not sure what kind though) and I'm sure a wooden trestle version will most
        likely be included. Personally, I don't care if the wooden trestle fits
        into a particular era or not, I just like the looks, so I'm going to have me
        one of those puppies.

        A question I have been meaning to ask, and since you have already gone
        there,........what type of glue did you use to glue your bents together
        with? And does the glue that somehow magically appears on areas of the
        parts you don't want it to, interfere with staining of the wood? I've tried
        some small bridge building in the past and had trouble with staining the
        wood that accidentally got glue on it in the wrong place. (I know it was my
        fault so can't complain about a lousy stain)

        Or, don't you use stain? Maybe acrylic paints do the trick? They seem to
        paint everything else nicely, but haven't yet tried using acrylics on wood.
        Thanks,
        Loren
      • Arie Knoops
        Loren I used the blackbear jig for my trestle, its so easy, thats why I had to make it hard on myself and build it in a freehand curved incline. What I did
        Message 3 of 8 , May 30, 2005
          Loren
          I used the blackbear jig for my trestle, its so easy, thats why I had to
          make it hard on myself and build it in a freehand curved incline. What I
          did was stain all the wood first. I used floquill paints to stain it, and
          used a mix of blended colors so that it was not a uniform color. Then I cut
          and assembled them. after each cut I would dip the ends in a bit of color.
          As for the glue I used plain white glue.
          Arie
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        • johnegert
          Loren----- Ditto to Arie s comments. Some variant of white glue is best for the jigged part of the construction since it will not stick to the plastic jig, and
          Message 4 of 8 , May 30, 2005
            Loren----- Ditto to Arie's comments. Some variant of white glue is best
            for the jigged part of the construction since it will not stick to the
            plastic jig, and any slop can be washed off the plastic if need be.
            Once the bents are out of the jig, I go back to ACC to speed things up.
            Prestaining is the best method to avoid glue resist, though I've gotten
            to where I paint bridges post-assembly so I can add some shading and
            highlighting--- a matter of preference. I should add that my finished
            bridge is about 6" high by about 12" long, and took me around four
            evenings of leisurely work.
            A graded, curved trestle, Arie! Try THAT without a clever jig of
            some kind!
            john
          • Ted LaMar
            And does the glue that somehow magically appears on areas of the parts you don t want it to, interfere with staining of the wood? I ve tried some small
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 1, 2005
              <snip>
              And does the glue that somehow magically appears on areas of the
              parts you don't want it to, interfere with staining of the wood? I've tried
              some small bridge building in the past and had trouble with staining the
              wood that accidentally got glue on it in the wrong place.
              </snip>

              Loren - Barret recommends that you finish all wood BEFORE construction. At least he did a couple years ago when I got my kits and jigs.



              T
            • David George
              I ve built 4 trestles of various sizes and I stained all the lumber before I even cut it. Then in fabrication you only have to touch the ends. I used furniture
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 1, 2005
                I've built 4 trestles of various sizes and I stained all the lumber before I even cut it. Then in fabrication you only have to touch the ends. I used furniture color staining pens. Easy to handle and come in a variety of stains.
                Cordially,
                Mister Dave

                Ted LaMar <ted_lamar@...> wrote:
                <snip>
                And does the glue that somehow magically appears on areas of the
                parts you don't want it to, interfere with staining of the wood? I've tried
                some small bridge building in the past and had trouble with staining the
                wood that accidentally got glue on it in the wrong place.
                </snip>

                Loren - Barret recommends that you finish all wood BEFORE construction. At least he did a couple years ago when I got my kits and jigs.



                T



                -Z- WARNING! HANDLE WITH CARE! Highly addictive in Small DoseZ!




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              • ken schulz
                Ted, when I built my trestle ( see photo Sunny Birch and Pine) I pre-stained all the wood first. I also added more ties between the track and added water
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 2, 2005
                  Ted, when I built my trestle ( see photo Sunny Birch and Pine) I pre-stained all the wood first. I also added more ties between the track and added water barrel platforms.

                  Ted LaMar <ted_lamar@...> wrote:<snip>
                  And does the glue that somehow magically appears on areas of the
                  parts you don't want it to, interfere with staining of the wood? I've tried
                  some small bridge building in the past and had trouble with staining the
                  wood that accidentally got glue on it in the wrong place.
                  </snip>

                  Loren - Barret recommends that you finish all wood BEFORE construction. At least he did a couple years ago when I got my kits and jigs.



                  T



                  -Z- WARNING! HANDLE WITH CARE! Highly addictive in Small DoseZ!




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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • waflyrod1
                  ... I ve tried ... the ... construction. At least he did a couple years ago when I got my kits and jigs. ... still soft and it should not interfere with
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 28, 2005
                    --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Ted LaMar" <ted_lamar@p...> wrote:
                    > <snip>
                    > And does the glue that somehow magically appears on areas of the
                    > parts you don't want it to, interfere with staining of the wood?
                    I've tried
                    > some small bridge building in the past and had trouble with staining
                    the
                    > wood that accidentally got glue on it in the wrong place.
                    > </snip>
                    >
                    > Loren - Barret recommends that you finish all wood BEFORE
                    construction. At least he did a couple years ago when I got my kits
                    and jigs.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > You can also wipe the wood with a wet rag or Q-tip while the glue is
                    still soft and it should not interfere with staining.
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