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90% (91%) alcohol

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  • Dave Hjortnaes
    As long as your 91% alcohol is isopropyl, you should not have a problem with your paint. If there is any acetone or other solvent other than water, WATCH OUT.
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 1, 2005
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      As long as your 91% alcohol is isopropyl, you should not have a
      problem with your paint. If there is any acetone or other solvent
      other than water, WATCH OUT. Unless of course you are stripping the
      paint, and planning on giving the item a new paint job.

      dave
    • themohican2003
      ... Everybody take heed! Isopropyl will damage paint. I use 99% isopropanol to strip paint from my models. Most paint will come off eventually from plastic
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 1, 2005
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        --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Hjortnaes" <dlhort1955@j...> wrote:
        >
        > As long as your 91% alcohol is isopropyl, you should not have a
        > problem with your paint. If there is any acetone or other solvent
        > other than water, WATCH OUT. Unless of course you are stripping the
        > paint, and planning on giving the item a new paint job.
        >
        > dave

        Everybody take heed! Isopropyl will damage paint.
        I use 99% isopropanol to strip paint from my models. Most paint will
        come off eventually from plastic models and will not harm plastic nor
        metals. I have had a few hopper cars soaking in the stuff for the last
        6 months, because the previous owner chose to paint them with an
        enamel based paint intended mostly for metal surfaces. The plastic to
        this day remains intact, I'm just waiting for a day when I can finish
        scraping off the paint in the hidden crevases. Acetone additives will
        indeed melt plastic and paint but nothing more. I did make the mistake
        of using a paint made mostly for metal models and it dissolved the
        plastic surface and would not strip off without using an invasive
        solvent which damaged the plastic surface. Older Floquil paints are
        off limits as well as ScaleCoat I. ScaleCoat II is just fine and the
        newer formula of Floquil is OK as long as you don't apply it too
        thickly (airbrush preferred in thin layers.)
        I have found it difficult to get paint to adhere to my resin castings
        even after scuffing the surface with a fiberglass brush. The only
        solvent I found to damage resin so far is superglue debonder. I think
        that has a solvent similar to acetone, although it doesn't smell the
        same, more like Butyl nitrate.
        I hope I have helped others to not try something costly.
        Allan Borg
        SuZee-Line Rail Models
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