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Re: [z_scale] Which of these two is better ??

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  • zbendtrack@aol.com
    ... Don t forget that on ALL curves, one wheel will roll, the other wheel will slide. Same with 1:1 trains. In your calculations, be sure to add about a half
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 1, 2004
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      Don:

      > On a 2%
      > curving grade, which of these would be better

      Don't forget that on ALL curves, one wheel will roll, the other wheel will
      slide. Same with 1:1 trains.

      In your calculations, be sure to add about a half percent drag factor to the
      "effective" grade on those curves, either way you decide to go.

      Then test your loco for train length on a temporary piece of straight track
      at a 2.5% grade to insure your expectations and the rules of physics match up
      well. <smile>

      Hope this thought helps,
      Bill K.
      Houston


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Lajos Thek
      ... Not so. The 1:1 trains have (not exactly, but close to) tapered profile. The reason, to avoid slippage in the turns. The inner wheel rolls on the smaller
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 1, 2004
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        --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, zbendtrack@a... wrote:

        > Don't forget that on ALL curves, one wheel
        > will roll, the other wheel will
        > slide. Same with 1:1 trains.


        Not so. The 1:1 trains have (not exactly, but close to)
        tapered profile. The reason, to avoid slippage in the
        turns. The inner wheel rolls on the smaller diameter, the
        outer wheel rolls on the -closer to the flange- larger
        diameter part of the wheel. High speed trains have "more
        flat" profile than trains running on smaller radius turns.
        The actual profile is very sophisticated, it compensates
        for the projected wear too.
        Lajos
      • d.f.avila@att.net
        This should get REALLY COMPLEX when you add super-elevation into the equation. Doubt my li ol Z-scale will get that far that adding super-el will make any
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 1, 2004
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          This should get REALLY COMPLEX when you add super-elevation into the equation. Doubt my li' ol' Z-scale will get that far that adding super-el will make any tracton difference, but I did wonder if in Z-scale the single curve or two curve plus a straight made a difference. Obviously a grade that is steep enough shuts everything down, but being a newbie I wanted to know if adding a short straight helped at all if the radius started to become small. OTOH hand my 19" is a lot greater than a Marklin 5". So far the suggestions are just go for the full radius and forget the straight - except for asthetic purposes. I don't know why this is so, but I'm accepting it as 'fact'.

          I do thank you all the several responses.

          ...don





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        • ted_lamar@peoplesoft.com
          a] a single curve of about 180 degrees; all on a 2% grade; and a single 19 inch radius. or b] two 15 inch curves on the same 2% grade with one 15 inch
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 14, 2004
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            a] a single curve of about 180 degrees; all on a 2% grade; and a
            single 19 inch radius.

            or

            b] two 15 inch curves on the same 2% grade with one 15 inch leading
            in and one 15 inch curve leading out plus about an 8 inch straight
            between the two curves.




            Go for the RADIUS!!!! The bigger the better.



            T
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