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Re: [z_scale] Re: 4-9-9-9-9-6 switcher Mallet

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  • Bill Hoshiko
    ... Alter-Rey, I m searching through my years of railroad magazines for a picture of one of these monsters. I first tried the Duluth Missabe and Iron Mountain
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 5, 2000
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      >
      > Hello All,
      > I'm holding out for a Z scale 4-9-9-9-6 compound articulated funicular
      > switcher
      > mallet with catenary or third rail pickup.
      >

      > regards,
      > Alter-Rey
      >
      >

      Alter-Rey,

      I'm searching through my years of railroad magazines for a picture of
      one of these monsters.

      I first tried the Duluth Missabe and Iron Mountain Railway (DM&IR) for
      they had massive switchers to switch the heavy taconite iron ore. I
      found an 0-10-0 switcher. They also had some 0-10-2 switchers that they
      got from the Union Railroad in Pittsburgh. They had the "Yellowstone"
      2-8-8-4 articulated, but it was a road engine and not a switcher. I
      don't know where any larger switchers were ever used.

      Then the use of cantenary led me to search the Virginian Railway who
      also used very large locomotives to move vast amounts of coal through
      the Allegheny Mountains. Didn't find it there either.

      The Burlington had some large electric locomotives under cantenary but
      I don't recall any super large switchers. They did have a lot of lumber
      for the wood burners.

      In the Rocky Mountains around Colorado they used those teeny tiney
      locomotives that the narrow minded people find so cute. No super large
      switchers there either.

      I Looked at the railroads around New York and Philadelphia for railroads
      that used third rail but then realized that that country was not
      mountainous enough for a funicular, let alone a funicular switcher.
      (Mt Washington has a funicular but it is not articulated nor is it a
      compound)

      I will keep looking though. Maybe one of you accross the pond or in the
      land of Oz can locate one. Maybe there is one in the Mountains of
      Africa where those funny looking locomotive with two tenders and a
      boiler hanging in mid air operate.

      If one is made for Z scale, what would be the minimum radius that you
      would expect this monster to negotiate.

      Bill
      El Toro
      (sorry to all of you who insist on only serious postings, but I just
      couldn't resist)
    • ben scaro
      The closest we could come to that in Oz is the Tasmanian Abt railway which is currently being rebuilt. They had 0-4-2Ts- with a centre cog- that might make
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 6, 2000
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        The closest we could come to that in Oz is the Tasmanian Abt railway which
        is currently being rebuilt. They had 0-4-2Ts- with a centre cog- that
        might make them 0-5-2s- and a third rack rail. Suppose an 0-4-2 might
        classify as a switcher. No catenary sorry . . .

        Ben


        >From: Bill Hoshiko <billhko@...>
        >Reply-To: z_scale@egroups.com
        >To: z_scale@egroups.com
        >Subject: Re: [z_scale] Re: 4-9-9-9-9-6 switcher Mallet
        >Date: Tue, 05 Dec 2000 19:43:22 -0800
        >
        > >
        > > Hello All,
        > > I'm holding out for a Z scale 4-9-9-9-6 compound articulated funicular
        > > switcher
        > > mallet with catenary or third rail pickup.
        > >
        >
        > > regards,
        > > Alter-Rey
        > >
        > >
        >
        >Alter-Rey,
        >
        >I'm searching through my years of railroad magazines for a picture of
        >one of these monsters.
        >
        >I first tried the Duluth Missabe and Iron Mountain Railway (DM&IR) for
        >they had massive switchers to switch the heavy taconite iron ore. I
        >found an 0-10-0 switcher. They also had some 0-10-2 switchers that they
        >got from the Union Railroad in Pittsburgh. They had the "Yellowstone"
        >2-8-8-4 articulated, but it was a road engine and not a switcher. I
        >don't know where any larger switchers were ever used.
        >
        >Then the use of cantenary led me to search the Virginian Railway who
        >also used very large locomotives to move vast amounts of coal through
        >the Allegheny Mountains. Didn't find it there either.
        >
        >The Burlington had some large electric locomotives under cantenary but
        >I don't recall any super large switchers. They did have a lot of lumber
        >for the wood burners.
        >
        >In the Rocky Mountains around Colorado they used those teeny tiney
        >locomotives that the narrow minded people find so cute. No super large
        >switchers there either.
        >
        >I Looked at the railroads around New York and Philadelphia for railroads
        >that used third rail but then realized that that country was not
        >mountainous enough for a funicular, let alone a funicular switcher.
        >(Mt Washington has a funicular but it is not articulated nor is it a
        >compound)
        >
        >I will keep looking though. Maybe one of you accross the pond or in the
        >land of Oz can locate one. Maybe there is one in the Mountains of
        >Africa where those funny looking locomotive with two tenders and a
        >boiler hanging in mid air operate.
        >
        >If one is made for Z scale, what would be the minimum radius that you
        >would expect this monster to negotiate.
        >
        >Bill
        >El Toro
        >(sorry to all of you who insist on only serious postings, but I just
        >couldn't resist)

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