Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: guitar strings

Expand Messages
  • Andy Hunting
    I m the guitar-string guy. For most of the superelevation, I used .026 steel guitar strings. 6 inches of elevation is .0273 in Z scale, so I used the closest
    Message 1 of 7 , May 3, 2004
      I'm the guitar-string guy.

      For most of the superelevation, I used .026" steel guitar strings. 6
      inches of elevation is .0273" in Z scale, so I used the closest
      common size. For the easements, I think I used .013" or .010"
      strings. Strings are available down to .007" or .008" (for heavy-
      metal guitarists), but I used only two sizes. The .026" stuff is
      actually a wire core wound with a finer wire. No problem.

      I insert pins into the roadbed every half-inch or so with the
      pinheads holding down the inside ends of the crossties (though I
      don't push them in all the way until my strings are in place). Then I
      get a variety of elevation heights from a single thickness of guitar
      string by varying its alignment under the outside ends of the
      crossties. With a .026 string running under the ties directly below
      the outside rail, the rail is theoretically raised .026 inches, or
      5.72 Z-scale inches. (In practice, I'm sure the cork roadbed
      compresses a little and lessens the elevation.) With a .026 string
      running under the outside crosstie ends instead of under the outside
      rail, the angle of the ties is lessened and the elevation of the rail
      will be something less than .026". The exact trigonometry hasn't been
      important to me; just what looks good. :-)

      To transition from .026" to a thinner string, I start the thinner
      string somewhere between the outer rail and the track centerline. As
      the curve decreases, I gradually run it outwards to the outer tie
      ends. Z flextrack supports itself quite well at the ends of the
      curves, so I haven't found it necessary use the really thin sizes.

      I use more pins to hold the wire in the desired alignment. Once
      everything's in place, I apply white glue around the string and under
      the inside tie ends. Then I hold the track down with pins through the
      centerline spike holes (not too much pressure here to keep from
      bending the ties) and use the pins on the inside tie-ends to hold the
      inside of the curve against the roadbed. Once the glue's dry, I
      remove the tie-end pins and the wire-positioning pins, leaving the
      centerline spikes in place.

      Check K&S or other manufacturers for "music wire" of similar
      thicknesses. This should work just as well as guitar string. The
      important thing is for the wire to have a bit of spring to it, so it
      forms a nice smooth curve instead of kinking the way soft electrical
      wire does.

      -- Andy Hunting

      --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, ted_lamar@p... wrote:
      >
      >
      > >Sometime back there was a post about using guitar strings under
      track for
      > superelevation. I have >searched the archives but cannot find it. I
      would
      > like to know what the size of the strings that were >used. Dale
      >
      > There were several sizes used. Starting with a very small one for
      a short
      > distance, then increasing in diameter every few inches until .008"?
      then
      > going back down again similarly... Kind of like an easement for the
      > superelevation.
      >
      > Can't say for sure that it was the .008 that was the biggest. But
      I sure
      > like the idea and plan to employ it.
      >
      > T
    • Tom Fisher
      Are there any photos of this type of layout on the web? ... __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs
      Message 2 of 7 , May 3, 2004
        Are there any photos of this type of layout on the
        web?

        --- Andy Hunting <zscale@...> wrote:
        >
        > I'm the guitar-string guy.
        >
        > For most of the superelevation, I used .026" steel
        > guitar strings. 6
        > inches of elevation is .0273" in Z scale, so I used
        > the closest
        > common size. For the easements, I think I used .013"
        > or .010"
        > strings. Strings are available down to .007" or
        > .008" (for heavy-
        > metal guitarists), but I used only two sizes. The
        > .026" stuff is
        > actually a wire core wound with a finer wire. No
        > problem.
        >
        > I insert pins into the roadbed every half-inch or so
        > with the
        > pinheads holding down the inside ends of the
        > crossties (though I
        > don't push them in all the way until my strings are
        > in place). Then I
        > get a variety of elevation heights from a single
        > thickness of guitar
        > string by varying its alignment under the outside
        > ends of the
        > crossties. With a .026 string running under the ties
        > directly below
        > the outside rail, the rail is theoretically raised
        > .026 inches, or
        > 5.72 Z-scale inches. (In practice, I'm sure the cork
        > roadbed
        > compresses a little and lessens the elevation.) With
        > a .026 string
        > running under the outside crosstie ends instead of
        > under the outside
        > rail, the angle of the ties is lessened and the
        > elevation of the rail
        > will be something less than .026". The exact
        > trigonometry hasn't been
        > important to me; just what looks good. :-)
        >
        > To transition from .026" to a thinner string, I
        > start the thinner
        > string somewhere between the outer rail and the
        > track centerline. As
        > the curve decreases, I gradually run it outwards to
        > the outer tie
        > ends. Z flextrack supports itself quite well at the
        > ends of the
        > curves, so I haven't found it necessary use the
        > really thin sizes.
        >
        > I use more pins to hold the wire in the desired
        > alignment. Once
        > everything's in place, I apply white glue around the
        > string and under
        > the inside tie ends. Then I hold the track down with
        > pins through the
        > centerline spike holes (not too much pressure here
        > to keep from
        > bending the ties) and use the pins on the inside
        > tie-ends to hold the
        > inside of the curve against the roadbed. Once the
        > glue's dry, I
        > remove the tie-end pins and the wire-positioning
        > pins, leaving the
        > centerline spikes in place.
        >
        > Check K&S or other manufacturers for "music wire" of
        > similar
        > thicknesses. This should work just as well as guitar
        > string. The
        > important thing is for the wire to have a bit of
        > spring to it, so it
        > forms a nice smooth curve instead of kinking the way
        > soft electrical
        > wire does.
        >
        > -- Andy Hunting
        >
        > --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, ted_lamar@p...
        > wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > >Sometime back there was a post about using guitar
        > strings under
        > track for
        > > superelevation. I have >searched the archives but
        > cannot find it. I
        > would
        > > like to know what the size of the strings that
        > were >used. Dale
        > >
        > > There were several sizes used. Starting with a
        > very small one for
        > a short
        > > distance, then increasing in diameter every few
        > inches until .008"?
        > then
        > > going back down again similarly... Kind of like an
        > easement for the
        > > superelevation.
        > >
        > > Can't say for sure that it was the .008 that was
        > the biggest. But
        > I sure
        > > like the idea and plan to employ it.
        > >
        > > T
        >
        >





        __________________________________
        Do you Yahoo!?
        Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs
        http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover
      • William Brock
        I had not read this before but I gather you do this for banking around curves, I would presume, especially high speed curves? What is the general formula
        Message 3 of 7 , May 3, 2004
          I had not read this before but I gather you do this
          for "banking" around curves, I would presume,
          especially high speed curves? What is the general
          formula used on railroads in reality, i.e. to acheive
          desired speed around curve radius equals degree of
          banking? I guess what I am getting at is is there any
          data on how extreme of an elevation from inside curve
          track to outside curve track do the real railroads get
          to in some instances?

          =====





          __________________________________
          Do you Yahoo!?
          Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs
          http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover
        • ted_lamar@peoplesoft.com
          ... Svein-Martin [sp?] has some great footage of trains negotiating his superelevated curves. On his website. T
          Message 4 of 7 , May 3, 2004
            >Are there any photos of this type of layout on the
            >web?


            Svein-Martin [sp?] has some great footage of trains negotiating his
            superelevated curves.

            On his website.

            T
          • Jim Glass
            That would be our group s, NWPZS, end modules with track laid super-elevated by Andy Hunting. JimGl ... From:
            Message 5 of 7 , May 4, 2004
              That would be our group's, NWPZS, end modules with track laid super-elevated by Andy Hunting.
              JimGl
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: ted_lamar@...<mailto:ted_lamar@...>
              To: z_scale@yahoogroups.com<mailto:z_scale@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, May 03, 2004 11:33 AM
              Subject: Re: [z_scale] guitar strings




              >Sometime back there was a post about using guitar strings under track for
              superelevation. I have >searched the archives but cannot find it. I would
              like to know what the size of the strings that were >used. Dale

              There were several sizes used. Starting with a very small one for a short
              distance, then increasing in diameter every few inches until .008"? then
              going back down again similarly... Kind of like an easement for the
              superelevation.

              Can't say for sure that it was the .008 that was the biggest. But I sure
              like the idea and plan to employ it.

              T






              "Z" WARNING! HANDLE WITH CARE! Highly addictive in Small DoseZ!



              Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              ADVERTISEMENT
              <http://rd.yahoo.com/SIG=129rtrn3r/M=295196.4901138.6052515.3001176/D=groups/S=1706533816:HM/EXP=1083696704/A=2128215/R=0/SIG=10se96mf6/*http://companion.yahoo.com>




              ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Yahoo! Groups Links

              a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/z_scale/<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/z_scale/>

              b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              z_scale-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com<mailto:z_scale-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>

              c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service<http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.