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Re: [z_scale] Re: Z-Scale Mallet Locomotive

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  • Bahls@t-online.de
    ... Dear Reynard Wellman, got to page 251,and not for the first time! ;-) Please excuse me for being a bit of a nitpicker sometimes,but we had such kind of
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 25, 2000
      Reynard Wellman schrieb:
      > Hello Michael Bahls,
      > Thanks for the tip, but the locomotive you are calling a "Mallet"
      > is certainly not we in the US understand that engine to be.
      > If you have access to Model Railroader "Cyclopedia, Vol I.
      > go to page 251 and you will see a very heavy USRA
      > 2-8-8-2 locomotive, also called a "Y6b". That is what we
      > refer to as a "Mallet". In Germany this may be different.

      Dear Reynard Wellman,
      got to page 251,and not for the first time! ;-)
      Please excuse me for being a bit of a "nitpicker" sometimes,but we had such kind
      of discussion in some other mail-forums,as to the name "Mallet".

      The "Mallet" (by her inventor Anatole Mallet) is an articulated compound
      locomotive with the LP cyls on the front gear,which,unlike to the rear one,is
      able to swivel.
      This definition is the same all over the world.
      Most european mallet locomotives were about that size of the Schmidt model;that
      is 0-4-4-0 or 0-6-6-0 ;mainly tank engines; often even on narrow - gauge.
      Locomotives coming even close to the N&W Y's were very scarce in Europe.The
      biggest german Mallet (when built the biggest tank engine of Europe) was the
      bavarian series "96", an 0-8-8-0 tank engine.No Mallet tender locomotive was
      built for german railways after about 1900.

      In fact, you picked a fine example, as the N&W Mallets are indeed "Mallets" per
      definitionem, unlike e.g.the UP Big Boys or the C&O 2-6-6-6 locos
      ("Articulateds")or the Pennsylvania T1s,S1s etc.("Duplexii").

      Surely,Reynard,I did not tell you anything you didn't know already (just wanted
      to show off a bit)...
      And - compared to the above mentioned US - locomotives,the tiny bavarian Mallet
      does fall into an entirely different category!And in that regard it is
      understandeable you might be a bit deceived. (Now everybody goes to page 251!).

      If you have any questions about the german catalogue,just feel free to ask.Some
      information might be found in german language only,and additional contact might
      be helpful.E.G.:Small locomotives as the BBII or the Kof are non - powered but
      to be used with a "Ghostwaggon" (car with flywheel-equipped can motor),because
      tiny locomotives with tiny motors do have "tiny" running qualities as
      well,usually.This is why we prefer to do the models matching to scale with as
      few as possible compromises, and let the ghostwaggons do the traction.Bigger
      locos do of course have motors;usually can-motors,if space permits it.

      Cheers,
      Michael
    • Bahls@t-online.de
      ... Hello David, thank you for building in the link! As I see,your link collection looks and works just fine! Indeed,for about one month,my whole homepage was
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 25, 2000
        D. A. Karp schrieb:
        > Michael,
        >
        > Thanks for the link - I've been looking for some way to view/obtain Schmidt
        > products. I've added it to my Z-scale manufacturers list at
        > http://www.creativelement.com/z/links/manufacturers.html
        >
        > I remember having the same problem of the missing products on your online
        > store (www.Michael-Bahls.de) a few months ago. The 'nächste' link at the
        > bottom of the page is just too small and inconspicuous to be seen.
        >
        > How is 'Bahls Modelleisenbahnen' affiliated with 'Schmidt Modelleisenbahn?'
        >
        > -David


        Hello David,
        thank you for building in the link! As I see,your link collection looks and
        works just fine!
        Indeed,for about one month,my whole homepage was not accessible with my
        domain at all;and I still do not know why.The server couldn't (or wouldn't) tell
        me.

        As to Schmidt or Bahls:
        Schmidt has been selling model trains in z scale for over twenty years.IIRC.He
        seeks contact to all small producers to sell their products,which
        otherwise,would not have been known at all.
        As well,he once started to build his own range of models.

        I have been building models since 1986;beginning with the T3.In fact,the model
        you own is a far cry from the first models - and I am still seeking something
        like "perfection";a goal,which might never be achieved.

        In 1993,Schmidt wanted to open a shop and produce his models in the same
        building.Before,he had received his Schmidt-models from other makers,and this
        was not always a reliable source for Schmidt.
        He asked me if I wanted to do it.In the years from 1986 I have been thinking of
        having my own small "firm",but felt the time was not right.Still I worked at
        reduced time,so giving me some small space to get on with the Z scale models
        after work.

        When Schmidt offered me to work for him,I hesitated until we discussed about
        some vital points;1) I only work four days a week for Schmidt;still having some
        time to create or build my small model range. 2)I was allowed to do
        so.Usually,here,if you work for e.g.VW in the carburator development
        department,you would not be allowed to have, lets say, a private carburator
        laboratory as a second job,so becoming a kind of competitor to your boss!

        So,I am allowed to build and continue the range of Bahls - products and sell
        them everywhere I want to,3 days a week.And in my Schmidt - working time, I work
        for the benefit of my boss!

        That's about the story - in brief...
        Cheers,
        Michael
      • Reynard Wellman
        Hello Guys, I guess I got real excited when Michael Bahls said he had a Mallet on the website. I knew that what they call a mallet in Europe, So. Africa, SE
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 25, 2000
          Hello Guys,
          I guess I got real excited when Michael Bahls said he had
          a "Mallet" on the website. I knew that what they call a mallet
          in Europe, So. Africa, SE Asia and Australia is not the same
          one we are familiar with in the US but because my desire for
          a Z scale Y6b is so great it distorted my expectations and I was
          a little disappointed. I still like the Euro "mallet" . I guess every
          dual driver set loco should now be called a mallet or something.

          regards,
          Reynard

          Bahls@... wrote:

          > Reynard Wellman schrieb:
          > > Hello Michael Bahls,
          > > Thanks for the tip, but the locomotive you are calling a "Mallet"
          > > is certainly not we in the US understand that engine to be.
          > > If you have access to Model Railroader "Cyclopedia, Vol I.
          > > go to page 251 and you will see a very heavy USRA
          > > 2-8-8-2 locomotive, also called a "Y6b". That is what we
          > > refer to as a "Mallet". In Germany this may be different.
          >
          > Dear Reynard Wellman,
          > got to page 251,and not for the first time! ;-)
          > Please excuse me for being a bit of a "nitpicker" sometimes,but we had such kind
          > of discussion in some other mail-forums,as to the name "Mallet".
          >
          > The "Mallet" (by her inventor Anatole Mallet) is an articulated compound
          > locomotive with the LP cyls on the front gear,which,unlike to the rear one,is
          > able to swivel.
          > This definition is the same all over the world.
          > Most european mallet locomotives were about that size of the Schmidt model;that
          > is 0-4-4-0 or 0-6-6-0 ;mainly tank engines; often even on narrow - gauge.
          > Locomotives coming even close to the N&W Y's were very scarce in Europe.The
          > biggest german Mallet (when built the biggest tank engine of Europe) was the
          > bavarian series "96", an 0-8-8-0 tank engine.No Mallet tender locomotive was
          > built for german railways after about 1900.
          >
          > In fact, you picked a fine example, as the N&W Mallets are indeed "Mallets" per
          > definitionem, unlike e.g.the UP Big Boys or the C&O 2-6-6-6 locos
          > ("Articulateds")or the Pennsylvania T1s,S1s etc.("Duplexii").
          >
          > Surely,Reynard,I did not tell you anything you didn't know already (just wanted
          > to show off a bit)...
          > And - compared to the above mentioned US - locomotives,the tiny bavarian Mallet
          > does fall into an entirely different category!And in that regard it is
          > understandeable you might be a bit deceived. (Now everybody goes to page 251!).
          >
          > If you have any questions about the german catalogue,just feel free to ask.Some
          > information might be found in german language only,and additional contact might
          > be helpful.E.G.:Small locomotives as the BBII or the Kof are non - powered but
          > to be used with a "Ghostwaggon" (car with flywheel-equipped can motor),because
          > tiny locomotives with tiny motors do have "tiny" running qualities as
          > well,usually.This is why we prefer to do the models matching to scale with as
          > few as possible compromises, and let the ghostwaggons do the traction.Bigger
          > locos do of course have motors;usually can-motors,if space permits it.
          >
          > Cheers,
          > Michael
          >
          >
          > "Z" WARNING! HANDLE WITH CARE! Highly addictive in Small DoseZ!
        • Reynard Wellman
          Hello Michael, I made another mistake. The mallet loco you have is actually a 0-4-4-0, not an 0-2-2-0. I sometimes get mixed up. Yea, I think I ll just refer
          Message 4 of 12 , Nov 25, 2000
            Hello Michael,
            I made another mistake. The mallet loco you have is actually
            a 0-4-4-0, not an 0-2-2-0. I sometimes get mixed up. Yea,
            I think I'll just refer to the one I really want as a Y6b, 2-8-8-2.
            That way no one will be confused by my emails.

            I'm hanging a picture of one on my wall right now.
            Now where did I put my molley screws?

            Warm regards,
            Reynard
            Bahls@... wrote:

            > Reynard Wellman schrieb:
            > > Hello Michael Bahls,
            > > Thanks for the tip, but the locomotive you are calling a "Mallet"
            > > is certainly not we in the US understand that engine to be.
            > > If you have access to Model Railroader "Cyclopedia, Vol I.
            > > go to page 251 and you will see a very heavy USRA
            > > 2-8-8-2 locomotive, also called a "Y6b". That is what we
            > > refer to as a "Mallet". In Germany this may be different.
            >
          • Ole Rosted
            On Sat, 25 Nov 2000 23:29:15 -0600, you wrote: Hello Reynard and group, ... That s the one coming to my mind - reading about the Schmidt-mallet. I have never
            Message 5 of 12 , Nov 26, 2000
              On Sat, 25 Nov 2000 23:29:15 -0600, you wrote:

              Hello Reynard and group,

              >I think I'll just refer to the one I really want as a Y6b, 2-8-8-2.
              >That way no one will be confused by my emails.

              That's the one coming to my mind - reading about the Schmidt-mallet.

              I have never seen a Mallet loc (except for in a train-series on the
              Discovery TV channel and a *beautiful* picture of a HO Y6B someone
              mailed me.

              But I would indeed like to buy a Z model of the Y6b if available,
              despite I for the moment have no track to run it on.

              The HO model is a marvel of detailing. I don't expect a Z model coming
              even close - but anyway.

              Anobody know where I can get one??

              BTW: On the Schmidt homepage the mallet is displayed on some Märklin
              (could be Peco?) track. Have you noticed that the rail height equals
              half a wheel dia. ?? Bvadr! - the need for code 40 track becomes
              evident.

              regards Ole Rosted, Denmark
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