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Re: Poor performance (again ;-)

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  • Arjen
    ... like that here ... Yes, it is the US stuff, even says made in USA on the bottle. So, fellow Europeans, just ask your barber. Who knows. Arjen
    Message 1 of 24 , Oct 1, 2003
      --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, "The Prez" <alextrov@e...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > >
      > >
      > I bought a bottle off my local barber shop, here in Utrecht,
      > Netherlands. Have you tried yours?
      >
      > Uhm... is it the US one? I do not think barber shops sell anything
      like that here
      > and do not think there is that particular brand at all in Italy.
      > maybe in some wholesale company for barber shops accessories.
      >

      Yes, it is the US stuff, even says "made in USA" on the bottle. So,
      fellow Europeans, just ask your barber. Who knows.

      Arjen
    • bill.foote
      I very much doubt if _any_ barber shop will actually advertise Wahl Oil for sale - you need to talk nicely to your barber to see if he will either sell you his
      Message 2 of 24 , Oct 1, 2003
        I very much doubt if _any_ barber shop will actually advertise Wahl Oil for
        sale - you need to talk nicely to your barber to see if he will either sell
        you his spare bottle or add one to his next barber-supplies order for you

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "The Prez" <alextrov@...>
        To: <z_scale@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2003 10:15 PM
        Subject: Re: [z_scale] Re: Poor performance (again ;-)


        ----- Original Message -----
        >
        >
        I bought a bottle off my local barber shop, here in Utrecht,
        Netherlands. Have you tried yours?

        Uhm... is it the US one? I do not think barber shops sell anything like that
        here
        and do not think there is that particular brand at all in Italy.
        maybe in some wholesale company for barber shops accessories.
      • de Champeaux Dominique
        ... Uhh, unfortunately, here in France I don t know any barbershop selling any railroad model, so Z scale stuff in a barbershop, I let you imagine! It s sad,
        Message 3 of 24 , Oct 2, 2003
          > Yes, it is the US stuff, even says "made in USA" on
          > the bottle. So,
          > fellow Europeans, just ask your barber. Who knows.
          >
          > Arjen

          Uhh, unfortunately, here in France I don't know any
          barbershop selling any railroad model, so Z scale
          stuff in a barbershop, I let you imagine! It's sad, as
          I have 2 barbershops in a 100m radius around my home!
          Unfortunately it will be long before we have a
          barbershop beeing like the sample at Tehachapi, CA.
          Cheers
          Dominique

          ___________________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!? -- Une adresse @... gratuite et en fran├žais !
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        • zbendtrack@aol.com
          ... Suggestion: look for a barber supply outlet. Or a ladies beauty supply outlet. Anyone that sells hair clippers will probably sell Wahl oil to go with
          Message 4 of 24 , Oct 2, 2003
            All:

            > I very much doubt if _any_ barber shop will actually advertise Wahl Oil

            Suggestion: look for a barber supply outlet. Or a ladies beauty supply
            outlet. Anyone that sells hair clippers will probably sell Wahl oil to go with
            them.

            "Sally Beauty Supply" is a huge chain store operation in the USA that sells
            all manners of things ladies use to be "beautiful." Although I feel totally
            out place when in the store surrounded by ladies talking about things I know
            nothing about, I find many train things:

            - Wahl Oil
            - Funny little applicators (like ear swabs) that make great
            applicators for weathering and cleaning
            - Tiny brushes for painting, at a fraction of the price at "art" stores
            - Foam backed sandpaper files (cheap)
            - Makeup powders in earth tones for weathering
            - Tiny wood and metal "picks" to use in constructing things
            - Foam sponges for cleaning
            - Plastic bottles, both hard and squeeze types with long snouts
            - Strange looking clamps, excellent for use as a "3rd" hand
            - Plastic storage boxes with compartments

            I you take your wife with you, she will be pleased to explain what all these
            things are "supposed" to be used for.

            Hope this helps,
            Bill Kronenberger
            Houston




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • tsa47
            Here in Canada I know Wal-Mart sell Wahl oil. ... Wahl Oil
            Message 5 of 24 , Oct 2, 2003
              Here in Canada I know Wal-Mart sell Wahl oil.




              --- In z_scale@yahoogroups.com, zbendtrack@a... wrote:
              > All:
              >
              > > I very much doubt if _any_ barber shop will actually advertise
              Wahl Oil
              >
            • Bruce
              While trying various ways to clean the Marklin Z track on my first Z setup, he battery powered blue 0-6-0 and car and optional track set with 4 turnouts, I
              Message 6 of 24 , Oct 2, 2003
                While trying various ways to clean the Marklin Z track on my first Z
                setup, he battery powered blue 0-6-0 and car and optional track set
                with 4 turnouts, I tried rubbing a small scrap of the cork sheet I
                had cut and fit as roadbed under the track and found it wipes the
                rails quite well and doesn't snag switch points like cloth does. The
                cork picks up oxidation real well and can be cleaned somewhat with
                rubbing alchohol a time or two but that's more work then it's worth
                as a small piece of cork will last for several cleanings on the
                double loop I have set up.

                I've worked with HO and a little N since I was a kid and for some
                reason I have never heard of putting Whal hair clipper oil on track
                to improve smooth operating. I imagine the trick is to use just
                enough to dampen the rail surface without getting it noticably wet
                and would suspect any really thin oil, like sewing machine oil, would
                work.

                I also have found getting just the right spring pressure on the motor
                brushes in all scales I've worked with can make a very big difference
                in how a loco runs. New out of the box the Marklin 0-6-0 I have would
                not run at the lowest transformer settings (the white one that came
                with the optional track set) and would tend to suddenly take off as
                power was increased.

                I found after adjusting the tension on the motor brushes until I
                found the right pressure that allowed it to start and ran the best
                without sputtering from too little brush pressure the loco would
                start and run at the first contact of the transformer wiper so well
                that I ended up having to put a small resistance in line with one of
                the power supply wires to the track so the loco would start smoothly
                and not take off suddenly at the first voltage the power supply puts
                out.

                What I used to drop track starting voltage a bit was a two commonly
                available 1 amp power supply type diodes (the little black ones with
                a grey stripe at one end) connected in series with one of the power
                supply wires, and another pair facing the opposite way in parallel
                (must have one pair in each direction to allow power to flow both
                ways for forward and reverse).

                The voltage drop across many low power diodes like those often found
                in the power supplies of small electronic devices is typicaly .3
                to .5 volts, which makes them an ideal way to drop a little voltage
                when needed on low voltage circuits like model railroads and ham and
                cb radio panel lights that uses 12 vdc for the panel lights. It is
                also a good way to reduce the brilliance and add life span to
                lighting used in model railroad buildings powered by a fixed dc
                voltage source.

                Those 1 am power supply type diodes can often be found in bulk packs
                at Radio Shack or any electronic parts supplier and aren't expensive
                (if they are then go somewhere else). If you don't mind doing a
                little disassembly and unsoldering they can be got for free from
                cheap am-fm radios, tape recorders, and any smaller electronic device
                that has a built in power supply that is going to be thrown out as
                junk.

                Hope this is of some help to the group.

                Bruce

                >turnouts some times.. I then noticed somebody in this group
                >mentioned the tiniest smear of Whal oil on the track improved things
                >dramatically. I tried this and have no more problems!
                > I found I could not by Whal oil in New Zealand anymore but found
                >Bernina sewing machine oil was the same thing.


                > Brush tension also makes a big difference.
              • David George
                Bruce, Don t confuse Whal OIL with other lubricants. It is not a true OIL but is primarily an oxidation inhibitor and does not provide a lubricant effect.
                Message 7 of 24 , Oct 2, 2003
                  Bruce,
                  Don't confuse Whal "OIL" with other lubricants. It is not a true OIL but is primarily an oxidation inhibitor and does not provide a lubricant effect.
                  David G.
                  "G~B&CC RR"

                  Bruce <n1yn@...> wrote:
                  While trying various ways to clean the Marklin Z track on my first Z
                  setup, he battery powered blue 0-6-0 and car and optional track set
                  with 4 turnouts, I tried rubbing a small scrap of the cork sheet I
                  had cut and fit as roadbed under the track and found it wipes the
                  rails quite well and doesn't snag switch points like cloth does. The
                  cork picks up oxidation real well and can be cleaned somewhat with
                  rubbing alchohol a time or two but that's more work then it's worth
                  as a small piece of cork will last for several cleanings on the
                  double loop I have set up.

                  I've worked with HO and a little N since I was a kid and for some
                  reason I have never heard of putting Whal hair clipper oil on track
                  to improve smooth operating. I imagine the trick is to use just
                  enough to dampen the rail surface without getting it noticably wet
                  and would suspect any really thin oil, like sewing machine oil, would
                  work.

                  I also have found getting just the right spring pressure on the motor
                  brushes in all scales I've worked with can make a very big difference
                  in how a loco runs. New out of the box the Marklin 0-6-0 I have would
                  not run at the lowest transformer settings (the white one that came
                  with the optional track set) and would tend to suddenly take off as
                  power was increased.

                  I found after adjusting the tension on the motor brushes until I
                  found the right pressure that allowed it to start and ran the best
                  without sputtering from too little brush pressure the loco would
                  start and run at the first contact of the transformer wiper so well
                  that I ended up having to put a small resistance in line with one of
                  the power supply wires to the track so the loco would start smoothly
                  and not take off suddenly at the first voltage the power supply puts
                  out.

                  What I used to drop track starting voltage a bit was a two commonly
                  available 1 amp power supply type diodes (the little black ones with
                  a grey stripe at one end) connected in series with one of the power
                  supply wires, and another pair facing the opposite way in parallel
                  (must have one pair in each direction to allow power to flow both
                  ways for forward and reverse).

                  The voltage drop across many low power diodes like those often found
                  in the power supplies of small electronic devices is typicaly .3
                  to .5 volts, which makes them an ideal way to drop a little voltage
                  when needed on low voltage circuits like model railroads and ham and
                  cb radio panel lights that uses 12 vdc for the panel lights. It is
                  also a good way to reduce the brilliance and add life span to
                  lighting used in model railroad buildings powered by a fixed dc
                  voltage source.

                  Those 1 am power supply type diodes can often be found in bulk packs
                  at Radio Shack or any electronic parts supplier and aren't expensive
                  (if they are then go somewhere else). If you don't mind doing a
                  little disassembly and unsoldering they can be got for free from
                  cheap am-fm radios, tape recorders, and any smaller electronic device
                  that has a built in power supply that is going to be thrown out as
                  junk.

                  Hope this is of some help to the group.

                  Bruce

                  >turnouts some times.. I then noticed somebody in this group
                  >mentioned the tiniest smear of Whal oil on the track improved things
                  >dramatically. I tried this and have no more problems!
                  > I found I could not by Whal oil in New Zealand anymore but found
                  >Bernina sewing machine oil was the same thing.


                  > Brush tension also makes a big difference.



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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • bill.foote
                  FWIIW the forward voltage drop in a Silicon Diode (the most usually found type these days) is 0.7 volt (the now almost completely obsolete Germanium Diode has
                  Message 8 of 24 , Oct 2, 2003
                    FWIIW the forward voltage drop in a Silicon Diode (the most usually found
                    type these days) is 0.7 volt (the now almost completely obsolete Germanium
                    Diode has a smaller forward voltage drop)

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Bruce" <n1yn@...>
                    To: <z_scale@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Thursday, October 02, 2003 6:14 PM
                    Subject: [z_scale] Re: Poor performance (again ;-)
                    >
                    > What I used to drop track starting voltage a bit was a two commonly
                    > available 1 amp power supply type diodes (the little black ones with
                    > a grey stripe at one end) connected in series with one of the power
                    > supply wires, and another pair facing the opposite way in parallel
                    > (must have one pair in each direction to allow power to flow both
                    > ways for forward and reverse).
                    >
                    > The voltage drop across many low power diodes like those often found
                    > in the power supplies of small electronic devices is typicaly .3
                    > to .5 volts, which makes them an ideal way to drop a little voltage
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