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Re: [z_scale] (unknown) Tunnel portal

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  • Bill Hoshiko
    Andy Just remember, tunnel portals over a curved piece of track must be extra wide. Passenger cars on sharp curves overhang the track in both directions. Put
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 9, 2000
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      Andy

      Just remember, tunnel portals over a curved piece of track must be extra
      wide. Passenger cars on sharp curves overhang the track in both
      directions.

      Put your longest car on your sharpest curve and place a block of
      something on either side. See how wide it must be for your train to
      pass through without hitting. Take your tallest(?) piece of equipment
      and that would be the height of the portal.

      The dimensions on your railroad must work for you. As for grades, it
      depends on the length of your trains. Short trains can take fairly
      steep grades for a short distance. Grades on curves cause greater drag
      than grades on straight track. Connect some track together and
      experiment.

      Have fun.

      Bill
      El Toro
    • zscale@retrograde.net
      Thanks, Bill K. & Bill H. I found some good-looking Z portals on the Web that measure just under 4 cm high with more than 3/4 of the height taken up by the
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 9, 2000
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        Thanks, Bill K. & Bill H.

        I found some good-looking Z portals on the Web that measure just
        under 4 cm high with more than 3/4 of the height taken up by the
        opening, so I'll go with the 3cm inside / 4cm outside rule of thumb
        for now.

        The HO drainage-culvert approach is creative! One scale's plumbing is
        another scale's tunnel; I could name my RR the Plumb Line. <grin>
        Okay, maybe not, but I'll try your suggestion next time I'm at a
        hobby shop.

        Good point about the lateral clearance around curves. I'm eagerly
        awaiting my "Capitol Limited" Pullman set, and those cars are plenty
        long. I've done away with virtually all the small-radius (#8510)
        curves in my layout plan, since they just look too small. If I have
        to use them, they will be hidden in a tunnel somewhere.

        > The dimensions on your railroad must work for you. As for grades,
        it
        > depends on the length of your trains. Short trains can take fairly
        > steep grades for a short distance. Grades on curves cause greater
        drag
        > than grades on straight track. Connect some track together and
        > experiment.

        What? An excuse to play with my trains? :D I'll tell my girlfriend
        it's all in the name of Scientific Research. She'll understand.

        To get to the necessary height, my trains will either need to climb a
        relatively straight track at a steeper grade, or else climb a more
        manageable grade with more curves. So I'll see which slows them down
        more.

        Jeffrey, good luck with the rest of the trip; hopefully you're home
        by now. My one trip to Redding, CA was via Amtrak a couple Decembers
        ago. A fun ride from Seattle with some breathtaking mountain scenery,
        moonlight on snow. But we underestimated how cold and tired one can
        get waiting by the tracks in Redding at about 2:30 in the morning.
        I'd never been so happy to see a train in my life!

        -- Andy
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