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Re: [z_scale] Z TRACK

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  • zbendtrack@aol.com
    ... Experts and rivet counters identify both Marklin and Peco track as representative of European sized ties (sleepers) and their normal spacing in 220:1
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 30, 2003
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      Fred:

      > Did I miss something? Marklin Z scale track is more prototypical - European-
      > and I thought I just read in one of the messages that micro train z track
      > is actually
      > Nn3?? And is PECO different as well? The only turn-outs are Marklin. So as
      > we strive to get exacting detail in our engines and rolling stock, our
      > track is really a mixed Bag?

      "Experts" and "rivet counters" identify both Marklin and Peco track as
      representative of European sized ties (sleepers) and their normal spacing in
      220:1 scale (Z). Marklin turnouts match this tie/sleeper pattern well.

      MicroTrains track is considered by these same folks to be representative of
      "American" scale track in 220:1 scale (Z) for ties/sleepers size and spacing.
      There are no mass produced turnouts that match MT track at this time, but
      there are small shops that do make matching turnout$.

      All three brands of track represent standard gauge track of 4 foot 8 1/2 inch
      rail-to-rail spacing in 220:1 (Z) scale.

      When you consider the same 0.25 inch spacing Z scale track in 160:1 (Nn3)
      scale, it represents a narrow gauge track of 3 feet, 4 inches. Which is very
      close to the normal 3 foot narrow gauge. The ties/sleepers then represent
      the smaller ties/sleepers sizes used in narrow gauge railroads. The error of
      4 inches in track gauge is just ignored by Nn3 folks. (Error to the prototype
      in N scale = 0.015625 Inches (0.0635 Centimeters). Nn3 folks put N scale
      bodies on top of Z scale trucks and power mechanisms. It passes the one
      meter viewing rule with flying colors.

      I'd suggest you use the track you prefer, and leave the micrometer in the
      toolbox. Unless you count rivets.

      Hope this helps,
      Bill K.




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