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Re: [z_scale] Re: Track

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  • David George
    When I lay track in curve transition areas, I like to solder one end of the flex track section to the straight section first so I have a more manageable unit
    Message 1 of 96 , Nov 3, 2002
      When I lay track in curve transition areas, I like to solder one end of the flex track section to the straight section first so I have a more manageable unit with which to work.I will do this from both ends of the area ,with the opposing section of flex track,if the length of the planned area exceeds the length of one section of flex track. I pick an easy access site , or a place where the stress on the track is lessened(if possible) to join the cuved sections. When you join the curved sections you will find that because they are curved it gives you easier movement to apply joiners than would be the case when you have a straight track meet.

      Happy RR Building!

      David G.

      Spring,Tx.


      jmac_han <jmac_han@...> wrote:Yeah, Cliff, the trick is to NOT start your curve immediately at the
      end of a piece of Marklin straight track. Start your flex this length
      of straight from the curve, tack it down (I use straight pins
      through the centre of the ties) and begin to bend the flex around
      the curve, using a gradually increasing tighter radius (easement
      approach).

      There is a terrific explanation of track laying on cork in the 'files -
      FAQ - How to lay removable track' by Bill Kronenberger.

      Cheers,
      Jeffrey MacHan

      --- In z_scale@y..., Cliff Travis <cliff@a...> wrote:
      > Hi,
      > I need advice on laying flex track.
      > Are there any tricks to getting smooth curves?----- to get a good
      > transition from a flextrack curve to straight standard Marklin
      track?----
      > best way to trim rail length?
      > Regards
      > Cliff



      "Z" WARNING! HANDLE WITH CARE! Highly addictive in Small DoseZ!


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    • Ben Scaro
      Of perhaps limited interest and circulation, but the Modelling the Railways of SA Convention notes include two fantastic articles arguing that track is a
      Message 96 of 96 , Feb 14, 2009
        Of perhaps limited interest and circulation, but the Modelling the
        Railways of SA Convention notes include two fantastic articles
        arguing that 'track is a model too' and suggesting a variety of ways
        of replicating the look of Australian track.

        On the mainlines track is well sleepered, but Australian branchlines
        are infamous for light rail and widely and unevenly spaced
        sleepers. On many narrow gauge lines with wood sleepers, every
        fourth or fifth sleeper would be steel, the intention being to hold
        the rails in gauge.

        In Z, modelling it would require the use of code 30 rail at least,
        but code 25 would be better.

        Ben


        > Here in Australia we have a variety of track.. nice laid beds of
        pre
        > fabricated concrete ties, laid in such a way as it heats up or
        cools
        > down in the desert, it moves out on the curves.
        >
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