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Re: [z_scale] attn Bill Hoshiko

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  • Ole Rosted
    On Tue, 29 Feb 2000 16:40:53 -0800, you wrote: Hello Bill, Thank you for your very elaborate description on soldering. I will follow it carefully, when I start
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 6, 2000
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      On Tue, 29 Feb 2000 16:40:53 -0800, you wrote:


      Hello Bill,

      Thank you for your very elaborate description on soldering.
      I will follow it carefully, when I start soldering.
      I managed to get some 0.56 mm solder with flux, but this is - I can
      now see - not what I need.
      Tomorrow I will go to a place a hundred miles or so south of here, to
      visit a company where everything you ever dreamed of (if you ever
      dream about soldering - - I do - all the time) can be bought. I will
      go for water soluable flux and pure (no flux) solder.

      >If you can, try to obtain Iain Rice's book. It was printed in England.
      >
      >"A Pragmatic Guide to Building, Wiring and Laying PCB TRACK" by Iain
      >Rice.

      I ordered the book from the company you mentioned. They had a "few
      copies left"
      I'm hoping that it will arrive very soon now.

      >You cannot be too careful laying track. If the track is not right the
      >train won't stay on it. If the train won't stay on the track why have
      >trains?

      Exactly! - I'm beginning to wonder why I have my trains. I only use
      them for putting couplers on them, and as an excuse for buying all
      these tools :-) (hardware AND software)

      >I still have not put down any test track. I have already spent over
      >$300.00 for stuff that I need to do a proper test section. Perhaps next
      >week I can start a little section. Only need to spend a few dollars
      >more.

      Just like me :-) I have bought a lot of fine tools, materials etc.
      Right now I am waiting for the above mentioned book and my Xuron
      cutter to arrive. Perhabs I'm just subconsciously trying to avoid the
      inevitable disaster, that no doubt will be the result of my efforts.


      regards Ole Rosted, Denmark
    • bjkronen@aol.com
      Ole: I get my solder flux from plumbing supply stores (or mega hardware stores over here). It is in paste form, which makes it easy to apply to the rails with
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 6, 2000
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        Ole:

        I get my solder flux from plumbing supply stores (or mega hardware stores
        over here). It is in paste form, which makes it easy to apply to the rails
        with a disposable match stick. I pay $2 for a life-time supply in a metal
        tin. I carefully read the label to insure it does not contain any acids.

        Plumbers use rosin based flux when they solder (with a torch) copper pipes
        together. And they certainly don't want any acid residue eating on the
        copper over the years.

        What works for me:

        I use a wire scratchwheel in a dremel tool to briefly touch both the rails to
        remove the paint (I paint the rails rust before they are installed) and other
        oxides, oils, etc. that may be on the side of the rail. Rails should be nice
        and shinny at the joint.

        Then I use a toothpick/matchstick to just put a thick film (not a glob) of
        paste across the joint.

        I use a 60 watt soldering iron that's connected to a light dimmer (I can dial
        in whatever temperature I want). I have marked the circular knob with
        positions: rails, big lugs, pc boards, small wires, etc. for the various
        temperatures I've found that work well.

        The iron has a flat nosed screwdriver tip, so that it makes excellent contact
        with both rails at the same time. You cant do that with a cone shaped tip.

        Be sure to wipe the tip with a rag anytime it is not shinny, which is often.
        When I start to solder, I touch the tip of the iron with the 60/40 solder to
        "wet" it. You don't want a glob of molten solder on it, just enough to see
        it.

        I apply the wet tip to the rails, and they smoke quite a bit as the solder
        paste boils. If your tip was "wet" you should be transferring quite a bit of
        heat to the rails at this point. If it is dry, then heat transfer will be
        slow, and the ties/sleepers will melt before the job is done.

        Before it solder paste is completely gone, I apply solder to the rails, not
        the tip. I'm in, and out, in under 2 seconds.

        Once the joint is cool, I pre-tinned 24awg wire (small) and flood the wire
        end, so that it is left with too much solder (a tiny glob). I hold the wire
        against the completed joint and touch the iron tip to the wire. I do not
        leave the iron against the joint long enough for the solder on the rails to
        melt, but just long enough for the solder on the wire to flow into the solder
        on the rails. One second tops. That gives me my power connection to the
        rail.

        I push the wire down though a hole in the table for connector to a much
        larger wire later. I don't connect all the wires under the table. Some are
        just left coiled up and insulated. But later, if I want to block the track,
        all I have to do it cut the rails, the power wires are already there. And I
        don't have to tear into completed ballast to get to the rails later.

        When your soldering iron tip is new, you can put a 45 degree bend in it.
        This allows the tip to touch the side of the rail absolutely horizontal,
        while your hand is at a comfortable 45 degree angle (just like when you write
        with a pencil).

        Regards,

        Bill Kronenberger
        Houston
      • Bill Hoshiko
        Ole Thank you for your confidence in my soldering methods. There are many different ways to solder. I am only suggesting one way. Recently I have seen several
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 8, 2000
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          Ole

          Thank you for your confidence in my soldering methods.

          There are many different ways to solder. I am only suggesting one way.

          Recently I have seen several posts where it is suggested that an iron of
          much higher watts may be better because you can quickly get in and get
          out before you melt any plastic ties or unsolder any previous joints.

          Years ago I used an iron with 250 watts. It worked well for me. Many
          of the modelers come from doing electronic component soldering and they
          are accustom to using low wattage soldering irons.

          I you join a group of model railroaders, you will find that each has his
          own idea of how to solder, how to use a paint sprayer, how to lay track,
          and how to do all the different things that we do in model railroading.
          None of them will be wrong as long as it accomplishes their goal.

          Try the method that I outlined and if it doesn't work well for you, try
          others. The best method is whatever works for you.

          Most first time solderer start with rosin core solder, making a mess.
          Use too much solder, and apply heat for much too long.

          The solder joint should not have a lump of solder. The cooled joint
          should be shiny and smooth. If is dull than you must redo it.

          Practice on various pieces of metals and find which works best for you.

          Soldering wires to wire our railroad is different from soldering track
          to PC ties.

          I don't believe than anyone ever got it right the first time. If they
          did, then they got it wrong the next 10 times. The first time was
          purely luck.

          Above all have fun. Don't forget that all of this is for entertainment?

          <:o))

          Bill
          El Toro

          Ole Rosted wrote:
          >
          > From: Ole Rosted <Ole.Rosted@...>
          >
          > On Tue, 29 Feb 2000 16:40:53 -0800, you wrote:
          >
          > Hello Bill,
          >
          > Thank you for your very elaborate description on soldering.
          > I will follow it carefully, when I start soldering.
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