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Re: [z_scale] using rc controllers with turnouts

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  • ted_lamar@peoplesoft.com
    The main problem I see is the number of recievers you would need. Unless you only have 5 or 6 switches you would need multiple radio/reciever sets as you can
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 11, 2002
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      The main problem I see is the number of recievers you would need. Unless
      you only have 5 or 6 switches you would need multiple radio/reciever sets
      as you can only run as many servos as channels. Unlesss there is a way
      to address multiple recievers with some of the new highest tech stuff - I
      am only familiar with basic R/C...cars and planes.

      The electrical interference I do not believe would be a problem.....unless
      you are extending your servo wires (maybe)

      T




      "Ole Rosted"
      <Ole.Rosted@get2n To: z_scale@yahoogroups.com
      et.dk> cc:
      Subject: [z_scale] using rc controllers with turnouts
      10/11/2002 07:38
      AM
      Please respond to
      z_scale







      Hi,

      Yet another crazy/stupid idea:

      Has anyone here ever considered using model aiplane RC
      servos as turnout actuators a la the turtle machines???
      Or the complete outfit: controls, receiver, servos?

      Has anyone actually tried this - and how was the outcomre?

      Width adequate modifications in servos and/or controller I believe it
      *can* be done! Anyone?

      Pro: *small* servos - easy (short) wiring.
      Contra: the electrical noise from locs may hamper receiving.

      But the servos might be useful anyway - with permanent PCM wiring for
      instance?

      These servos are so small that surface mount (= on the layout in a
      building, mountain) is possible hence providing easy access witthout
      the need to turn the whole thing upside down during repair etc.

      For those module-guys the benefits are IMHO even greater. Activating
      turnouts no matter where and how the modules are arranged.

      This idea may - like my other brain-childs - face an early demise. :-(

      regards Ole Rosted





      "Z" WARNING! HANDLE WITH CARE! Highly addictive in Small DoseZ!


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    • Reynard Wellman
      Hello Ole, The use of PCM (pulse coded modulation) should work for turnouts as well as RPVs. But if your layout has multiple turnouts it would get pretty
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 11, 2002
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        Hello Ole,

        The use of PCM (pulse coded modulation) should work for
        turnouts as well as RPVs. But if your layout has multiple turnouts
        it would get pretty complicated finding code frequencies for each one.
        Your neighbors might also get involved especially if you
        are emitting more than10W in the radio spectrum, (you could be
        activating and/or deactivating critical systems). However,
        if you live on an estate surrounded by forests and hills you
        might not bother anybody.

        Remote control on TV sets are activated in the infrared zone, that
        might be
        another option with less isotropic effect.

        But, hey, somebody ought to try it. I'm always for a better way.
        Let's see, where's my checkbook? I haven't spent enough thousands
        of dollars on these trains yet....

        Just musing about,

        Reynard

        Ole Rosted wrote:

        > Hi,
        >
        > Yet another crazy/stupid idea:
        >
        > Has anyone here ever considered using model aiplane RC
        > servos as turnout actuators a la the turtle machines???
        > Or the complete outfit: controls, receiver, servos?
        >
        > Has anyone actually tried this - and how was the outcomre?
        >
        > Width adequate modifications in servos and/or controller I believe it
        > *can* be done! Anyone?
        >
        > Pro: *small* servos - easy (short) wiring.
        > Contra: the electrical noise from locs may hamper receiving.
        >
        > But the servos might be useful anyway - with permanent PCM wiring for
        >
        > instance?
        >
        > These servos are so small that surface mount (= on the layout in a
        > building, mountain) is possible hence providing easy access witthout
        > the need to turn the whole thing upside down during repair etc.
        >
        > For those module-guys the benefits are IMHO even greater. Activating
        > turnouts no matter where and how the modules are arranged.
        >
        > This idea may - like my other brain-childs - face an early demise. :-(
        >
        > regards Ole Rosted
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor

        ADVERTISEMENT

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        >
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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • M. Gottschalch
        Ole, Sounds like a good idea, at least with permanent wiring. how do they compair in cost with other means of activation? I would still put them underneath the
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 11, 2002
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          Ole,

          Sounds like a good idea, at least with permanent wiring. how do they
          compair in cost with other means of activation? I would still put them
          underneath the layout so that spring wire can be used to connect to the
          turnout. I think these thing may be powerful enough to cause damage to
          the turnouts if connected with a push-pull wire. They turn quite far
          from what I can recall of early play with that stuff.
          --
          Manfred G
        • M. Gottschalch
          ... Now I like the idea of the IR remote control. The reciever windows could be built into an office building or a tower on the top of a mountain. That would
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 11, 2002
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            Reynard Wellman wrote:
            >
            >
            > Remote control on TV sets are activated in the infrared zone, that
            > might be
            > another option with less isotropic effect.
            >

            Now I like the idea of the IR remote control. The reciever windows could
            be built into an office building or a tower on the top of a mountain.
            That would give reception from all sides.
            --
            Manfred G
          • Nelson Snedeker
            Hi Ole: Nothing crazy or stupid about R/C servos for actuators except the cost of Radio transmitter, Receiver , Ni-Cad batteries , Charger , and all those
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 11, 2002
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              Hi Ole: Nothing crazy or stupid about R/C servos for actuators except
              the cost of Radio transmitter, Receiver , Ni-Cad batteries , Charger ,
              and all those Servo's. I have used them for controls on Steam boats ,
              Electric boats, Airplanes , Gliders , etc. The amount of motion you
              would need is determined by the length of the moment arm from the center
              of rotation of the arm . The full rotation of the servo would be the
              best way to go because you could positively lock the turnout in open or
              closed position automatically . That is how Bomb bays and landing gear
              on planes are locked up or down ( At least it is the cheapest way )
              Porportional control would mean you would have to visually stop the
              motion in both directions. Just determine how much motion you need and
              then drill the connecting hole in the arm , where full servo rotation
              will provide that amount of linear motion.
              Happy "Z"ing Nel

              Ole Rosted wrote:

              > Hi,
              >
              > Yet another crazy/stupid idea:
              >
              > Has anyone here ever considered using model aiplane RC
              > servos as turnout actuators a la the turtle machines???
              > Or the complete outfit: controls, receiver, servos?
              >
              > Has anyone actually tried this - and how was the outcomre?
              >
              > Width adequate modifications in servos and/or controller I believe it
              > *can* be done! Anyone?
              >
              > Pro: *small* servos - easy (short) wiring.
              > Contra: the electrical noise from locs may hamper receiving.
              >
              > But the servos might be useful anyway - with permanent PCM wiring for
              >
              > instance?
              >
              > These servos are so small that surface mount (= on the layout in a
              > building, mountain) is possible hence providing easy access witthout
              > the need to turn the whole thing upside down during repair etc.
              >
              > For those module-guys the benefits are IMHO even greater. Activating
              > turnouts no matter where and how the modules are arranged.
              >
              > This idea may - like my other brain-childs - face an early demise. :-(
              >
              > regards Ole Rosted
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor

              ADVERTISEMENT

              [Image]

              [Image]

              >
              > "Z" WARNING! HANDLE WITH CARE! Highly addictive in Small
              > DoseZ!
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Brian Reynolds
              Hello to the group! I just started in Z three weeks ago after being an N scaler forever. I am modeling the Great Northern & the Northern Pacific in Z , and
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 12, 2002
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                Hello to the group!

                I just started in Z three weeks ago after being an N scaler forever.
                I am modeling the Great Northern & the Northern Pacific in "Z", and
                the Northern Pacific in "N", so scratch building and painting are my
                best means of aquiring the equipment I want.

                In respose to using RC servos. Myself and some of the members of our
                NTrack club have been using servos for quite some time to throw
                turnouts, throw turnouts and reverse power in reversing loops,
                operate my homemade semaphores, and much more.

                We do this without a transmitter of any kind by using a small
                inexpensive Basic programmable computer known as a "Basic Stamp" ( go
                to http://www.parallaxinc.com for more info or just type in basic
                stamp on most search engines).

                You can plug a servo directly into the thing using the its 5 volt
                output. You program the Basic Stamp using the serial port cable
                included with some basic stamp kits or build your own with
                information available on the net. They also make better, more memory
                versions which are capable of limited multitasking.

                Used in conjunction with photo cells mounted in the track I was able
                to control working semaphores on both ends of a tunnel, automatically.
                Our N track (grvs.com) president inspired me to do this project. I
                ordered and built my stamp at a cost of less than $50.00 and it was a
                simple project. I hadn't soldered an elctronic kit since high school
                yet it took less than a couple hours to get it assemblea and tested.

                So there you have it. I get servos for less than $10.00 apiece at a
                local RC shop and they can be programed to move in 1 degree
                increments so slow motion is an option. If you have access to back
                issues of N Scale magazine, check out the semaphore articles in the
                July/August and September/October 2000 issues. The first deals with
                building and operating the semaphores and the second covers Basic
                Stamps and programming.

                I hope this helps out anyone wanting to try using servos, we did and
                we will never go back!

                Sincerely,

                Brian F. Reynolds


                PS: Anyone with American style passenger cars they don't use can sell
                any road name to me, used or new, it doesn't matter to a collector
                who finally wised up and turned into a runner. I need at least 8 dome
                cars, 2 observations, 4 baggage, 4 sleepers, 2 diners, and many
                coaches. Please contact me off list at bfreynolds@....
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