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busy: attn Bill and Roy

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  • Ole Rosted
    Hi, Thank you very much for your detailed instructions on handlaying track. There is a lot of useful hints in your letters. I too tends to make my solutions a
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 2, 2000
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      Hi,

      Thank you very much for your detailed instructions on handlaying
      track.

      There is a lot of useful hints in your letters.
      I too tends to make my solutions a bit too complicated, and therefore
      never get to the point of actually doing something.

      But the tools and materials that I have heaped together through the
      past year demand some action now. Besides I'm tired of lookin at my
      trains without having a layout to run them on.

      One thing surprises me: Bill speaks about liquid flux applied with a
      syringe. What kind of flux is this? My solder has "multicore flux"
      built into it.
      Could be, that the liquid flux is better, but I haven't heard of
      liquid flux since my boyhood.
      At that time I made liquid flux by dissolving Zink (Zn) in HCl
      (whatever this is called in english. A guess: chlorine acid??)

      I take it, we are not talking about this harsh fluid?

      regards Ole Rosted, Denmark
    • Bill Hoshiko
      ... snip ... Go to your nearest electronic supply store. They will have an assortment of solders and flux. There are acid fluxes and rosin fluxes. Use only
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 2, 2000
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        Ole Rosted wrote:
        >
        > From: Ole Rosted <Ole.Rosted@...>
        >
        snip
        >
        > One thing surprises me: Bill speaks about liquid flux applied with a
        > syringe. What kind of flux is this? My solder has "multicore flux"
        > built into it.
        > Could be, that the liquid flux is better, but I haven't heard of
        > liquid flux since my boyhood.
        > At that time I made liquid flux by dissolving Zink (Zn) in HCl
        > (whatever this is called in english. A guess: chlorine acid??)
        >
        > I take it, we are not talking about this harsh fluid?
        >
        > regards Ole Rosted, Denmark
        >

        Go to your nearest electronic supply store. They will have an
        assortment of solders and flux. There are acid fluxes and rosin
        fluxes. Use only the flux that is recommended for electronics use.
        Acid fluxes will eventually destroy all of your work. I had spike heads
        eaten away by acid flux. Some rosin fluxes are also corrosive.

        There are many different solders. I guess that the most common is 60%
        tin and 40% lead. I was at the store yesterday and I found three
        different ratios of tin to lead. I do not know what difference they all
        make. Maybe some one on this list can help. I think that the melting
        point of the solder is affected. This could also effect the strength of
        the bond.

        Rosin core solders have a center core of rosin which would make it seem
        to be convenient for the user. For our use, we want to be precise as to
        where the solder goes. We want to be precise where we put the flux. If
        the flux is in the solder we have no control. Also, when ever I use
        this type, the heat of the iron will melt the flux out of the solder
        before I can position it properly. When I apply the solder there is no
        flux. Very frustrating.

        At the store you will find solid core solder. From this you can slice
        small pieces for fastening your track.

        I do not believe that you must use a syringe to apply the flux but a
        tooth pick or other small pointed object can be used. Use only a small
        amount of flux because it will melt and run all over the place. The
        solder will follow it. Practice will show you how little solder and
        flux is required.

        For me, the fun of model railroading is in learning new things. I have
        learned many things about geology while trying to design a layout. I
        have learned about electricity, metals, photography, woods, paints, and
        even the internet. The problem is that each of these things take time,
        specially the internet. I have spent 2 hours surfing the net looking
        for information about solder and found a lot of interesting things, but
        nothing about the different qualities of tin and lead ratios in solder.

        Do not get discouraged. The joy of watching a train operate over your
        hand laid track will reward you for all your efforts.

        Bill
        El Toro
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