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  • Ole Rosted
    Hello all, I m still here, but trying to design my coming layout with the 3rd PlanIt and - at the same time trying to make some tools enabling me to do the
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 29, 2000
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      Hello all,

      I'm still here, but trying to design my coming layout with the 3rd
      PlanIt and - at the same time trying to make some tools enabling me to
      do the practical work handlaying code 40 rail - has kept me busy.

      Rigth now I have materials and the nescerssary fine tip soldering
      iron, (the Xuron cutter still on its way - from Sweden!!!. Getting
      things from RLW is much faster).

      Holding the rail in position while soldering it to the tie presents a
      problem. I have "invented" a device, that will grip the rail betwen
      the foot and the rail head still allowing the rail to be moved
      longitudinally over the PC tie strip for repeated solderings. Thereby
      allowing fishbone rail to be produced by the meter/foot.

      The difficulties transferring my ideas from paper-space to the real
      space/world make me once more ask: Is anyone here aware of a place
      where code 40 Z track can be bought???

      And: is anyone here building her/his own code 40 Z track??
      if affirmative: how do you hold your rail in position when
      soldering??'

      regards Ole Rosted
    • Bill Hoshiko
      I haven t used this method since 1970 but I think that it will work. First you must tin the PC tie. To do this (I remember a hint from an old Model
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 29, 2000
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        I haven't used this method since 1970 but I think that it will work.

        First you must "tin" the PC tie.

        To do this (I remember a hint from an old Model Railroader article by
        Jack Work) you should slice yourself a thin slice of solder. You just
        need a very little piece. Put a little flux on the tie . Just enough
        for the rail to fit. Rereading Iain Rice's book on "Building , Wiring
        and Laying PCB Track" I see where he recommends using a 15 ml.
        hypodermic syringe to place liquid flux precisely on the tie. His
        remark is that the solder will go wherever the flux goes.

        Lay the little piece of solder on it and touch this with your iron. You
        should have a shiny piece of solder melted onto the PC tie no larger
        than the bottom of the rail. The melted solder should lie flat. If you
        have a small dome of solder, you used too much.

        Make certain that the bottom of the rail is clean. You should file or
        use sand paper to clean it. If the metal is not clean it will not hold.

        Put a little flux on the bottom of the rail. Position the rail to the
        tie. You should be able to hold the rail to the tie with your fingers.
        If you heat the rail until the heat gets to your finger, you are holding
        the iron to the rail too long. Too much heat could cause the PC tie to
        delaminate (sp?).

        If you still need some help to keep the rail in place, you could make a
        little sand bag. (a little sand in an old sock will do)

        With the rail placed on the solder spot on the PC tie all you need to do
        is to touch the rail with your iron and it should solder together. Your
        iron should not be more than a 20 watt iron. Rice recommends a 15 watt
        iron. Code 40 is so small that it shouldn't take but a second for the
        solder to melt. No need to press on the rail with the iron. Be certain
        that the iron is clean and tinned. No solder should squeeze out from
        under the rail.

        You do not need to take the solder to the rail or PC with your iron. A
        little practice and soon you will be laying rail as fast as the UP and
        CP did at Promontory, Utah.

        When attaching the other rail, use lots of rail gauges to keep the rail
        properly gauged.

        I have not tried this for over 30 years so if others have better methods
        please post here. We all can learn.

        Also, please post pictures. Good luck.

        If you can, try to obtain Iain Rice's book. It was printed in England.

        "A Pragmatic Guide to Building, Wiring and Laying PCB TRACK" by Iain
        Rice.

        I cannot find a publisher's name. I bought it from International
        Hobbies in Auburn, California. e-mail interhob@....

        You cannot be too careful laying track. If the track is not right the
        train won't stay on it. If the train won't stay on the track why have
        trains?

        I still have not put down any test track. I have already spent over
        $300.00 for stuff that I need to do a proper test section. Perhaps next
        week I can start a little section. Only need to spend a few dollars
        more. Maybe I'm going about it incorrectly?

        Bill
        El Toro

        Ole Rosted wrote:
        >
        > From: Ole Rosted <Ole.Rosted@...>
        >
        > Hello all,
        >
        > I'm still here, but trying to design my coming layout with the 3rd
        > PlanIt and - at the same time trying to make some tools enabling me to
        > do the practical work handlaying code 40 rail - has kept me busy.
        >
        > Rigth now I have materials and the nescerssary fine tip soldering
        > iron, (the Xuron cutter still on its way - from Sweden!!!. Getting
        > things from RLW is much faster).
        >
        > Holding the rail in position while soldering it to the tie presents a
        > problem. I have "invented" a device, that will grip the rail betwen
        > the foot and the rail head still allowing the rail to be moved
        > longitudinally over the PC tie strip for repeated solderings. Thereby
        > allowing fishbone rail to be produced by the meter/foot.
        >
        > The difficulties transferring my ideas from paper-space to the real
        > space/world make me once more ask: Is anyone here aware of a place
        > where code 40 Z track can be bought???
        >
        > And: is anyone here building her/his own code 40 Z track??
        > if affirmative: how do you hold your rail in position when
        > soldering??'
        >
        > regards Ole Rosted
        >
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        > CraZy 'bout Zee!
      • Roy Stevens
        ... Not yet available. Mebbe we need to bug railcraft about making some for us. ... http://www.inet-1.com/~prospector/NN3CONS.htm I have used both RLW s
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 29, 2000
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          >Is anyone here aware of a place
          >where code 40 Z track can be bought???
          Not yet available. Mebbe we need to bug railcraft about making some for us.
          >
          >And: is anyone here building her/his own code 40 Z track??
          >if affirmative: how do you hold your rail in position when
          >soldering??'
          http://www.inet-1.com/~prospector/NN3CONS.htm
          I have used both RLW's three-point track gauge, and I have just used my
          finger. With the finger method, I just go along soldering one rail to
          approximately the right spot, then I come back and use a short piece of
          marklin track to check the gauge as I go along and solder the second rail
          into place. It helps to cut the PC ties long, then trim them later, since I
          don't always get the rails centered using this method. I also bake my rails
          at 450 deg F for 20 min, then let cool before laying track. This seems to
          eliminate sun kinks that can crop up when soldering code 40. Also, instead
          of a rail nipper, I just use my motor tool with a cut-off disk. And rather
          than rail joiners, I use extra pc ties near joints, and solder the rail ends
          together.

          >
          >regards Ole Rosted
          >
          >


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        • Bill Hoshiko
          Where did you get that trick of heating the rail to 450 deg F ? I ll try it! Thanks
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 29, 2000
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            Where did you get that trick of heating the rail to 450 deg F ?

            I'll try it! Thanks <:o))

            I guess that I always make my solutions too complicated. That's why I
            haven't built any thing for 35 years.

            Your layout is great! and thanks for the link to the Nn3 web page. I
            should have tried that web page much sooner. They and you do
            outstanding work.

            Bill
            El Toro

            Roy Stevens wrote:
            >
            > From: "Roy Stevens" <riogrande5771@...>
            >
            > >Is anyone here aware of a place
            > >where code 40 Z track can be bought???
            > Not yet available. Mebbe we need to bug railcraft about making some for us.
            > >
            > >And: is anyone here building her/his own code 40 Z track??
            > >if affirmative: how do you hold your rail in position when
            > >soldering??'
            > http://www.inet-1.com/~prospector/NN3CONS.htm
            > I have used both RLW's three-point track gauge, and I have just used my
            > finger. With the finger method, I just go along soldering one rail to
            > approximately the right spot, then I come back and use a short piece of
            > marklin track to check the gauge as I go along and solder the second rail
            > into place. It helps to cut the PC ties long, then trim them later, since I
            > don't always get the rails centered using this method. I also bake my rails
            > at 450 deg F for 20 min, then let cool before laying track. This seems to
            > eliminate sun kinks that can crop up when soldering code 40. Also, instead
            > of a rail nipper, I just use my motor tool with a cut-off disk. And rather
            > than rail joiners, I use extra pc ties near joints, and solder the rail ends
            > together.
            >
            > >
            > >regards Ole Rosted
            > >
            > >
            >
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            > CraZy 'bout Zee!
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