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Rocks

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  • James Owens
    Hi Gang, I m new to this layout building thingy and in need of help with the basics of realism in the construction of the background. I must point out that
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 6, 2002
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      Hi Gang,

      I'm new to this layout building thingy and in need of help with the basics of realism in the construction of the background. I must point out that nothing has yet been done. I really want the rocks and mountains to look good.

      Is there anywhere on the net that deals with the "how to do" for people that haven't done before?

      Regards,

      Terry



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    • David George
      I have two laytex molds purchased from a train show vendor 6-8 years ago. They are molded from shale found in Arizona. Each mold is about 4 x 8 . I have used
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 16, 2007
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        I have two laytex molds purchased from a train show vendor 6-8 years ago.
        They are molded from shale found in Arizona. Each mold is about 4" x 8". I have used these two molds ,exclusively, to make ALL of my geology over the years. I Hydrocal cast the mold ,,then cut it into smaller pieces,,apply a liberal "Squish " of Sculptamold(water and Elmers glue mix ) to the back,,,put piece on the surface,,and then sculpt the squish between pieces to carry the elements of the rock to create a whole area of pleaseing geology.
        Easy to stain / paint,,,and cheap too.
        Cordially,
        Mister Dave
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Loren Snyder
        To: z_scale@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, November 16, 2007 8:23 AM
        Subject: spam: Re: [Z_Scale] Rubber Rocks


        Morning Reynard,

        Right on all points. It's just that I looked at this rock in my possession
        for months and didn't want to cut it up at all, and I calculated the many
        rocks that I'd need for some of my modules and figured the overall cost was
        too steep.

        Nothing wrong with the rocks themselves except your two listed disadvantages
        kept me from going further. The texture did appear a bit too large for Z
        and I just hate to waste any material like you mentioned.

        When it caught my attention at a train show a couple of years ago, I
        immediately liked it and I think I did one of those "spur of the moment"
        purchases. This impulse buying seems to be a trait of this particular Z
        scaler.......hmmmm.

        Yes, John Cubbin would be the obvious choice to approach a manufacturer in
        regards to making more Z friendly rocks, but in real life even mommy nature
        doesn't often create quite the detail in Z that I'd like to see.

        I've talked with Joel Bragdon from Bragdon Enterprises on several occasions
        about such a topic and he told me that in his many travels looking for the
        finer rock surfaces to model, there just isn't that much suitable material
        to model for Z scale.

        I once spent a couple of hours at two different landscape sites that had
        tons and tons of different rocks. I must have looked pretty silly pouring
        over dozens of "potential" subjects to make molds from. I walked away empty
        handed and disappointed because I hadn't found a single rock that I was
        pleased with......but then you know how picky us Z scalers can be.
        I'm not saying that you won't find the perfect specimen if you look long
        enough. Jason Alles of Fannocreek in our CZM club did find a couple of
        small rocks that he was able to duplicate with his own mold that really
        looked nice, but how many times can you turn a rock mold around before your
        eye begins to notice "something strangely familiar about this hillside".

        Prowling the rock pits of America,
        Loren

        -------Original Message-------

        From: Reynard Wellman
        Date: 11/16/2007 4:50:35 AM
        To: z_scale@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Z_Scale] Rubber Rocks

        Hi Loren,

        http://www.cripplebush.net/

        Four advantages:
        1] The rock texture is accurate and elegantly detailed.
        2] These items are already properly colored for the kind
        of minerals they represent.
        3] Being rubber, they can be fitted and re-fitted to
        make a believable, light weight, geophysical appearance.
        4] The amount of labor and research it would take for
        me to do the same modeling would eat up more time
        than I can afford.

        Two disadvantages:
        1] They are designed for HO scale and may not look
        right for our scale, "Z".
        2] Cost is about right for the amount of area covered,
        however, Z scale does not need a lot of huge slabs
        and I would hate to waste any of this material.

        John Cubbin of http://www.ztrains.com/ has done
        extensive highly detailed Z scale dioramas that include
        some rock face surfaces that are very impressive.
        He might be able to contribute many ideas that could
        guide a manufacturer to make smaller Z scale
        rubber rock faces at a lower cost per piece.

        Best regardZ,
        Reynard
        http://www.micronart.com


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