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512Re: ....tieplate

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  • BJKRONEN@xxx.xxx
    Oct 30, 1999
      Wolfgang:

      > I have a good - as I believe - picture-dictionary in 3 languages. If you
      > could just draw a tieplate and send it to me - << wbolt1809@... >> -
      as
      > an attachment, I am full of hope to be able to supply the list with the
      > European (do you mean German ?) and French corresponding expression of it.

      Thanks for the offer. When you look at this sketch, you will know why I plan
      to keep my regular job, and not go into commercial art:

      http://members.aol.com/bjkronen/tieplate.jpg
      - or -
      <A HREF="http://members.aol.com/bjkronen/tieplate.jpg">tieplate
      drawing</A>

      But it will hopefully get the point across.

      In the USA, in order to keep the steel rail from beating the tie/sleeper to
      death as it bounces up and down when a train runs over it, there is normally
      a square piece of thick extruded shaped steel under the rail and on top of
      the tie/sleeper. It has holes in it for the spikes (big square nails) to
      pass through.

      The tieplate tends to move up and down with the tie/sleeper, and not the
      rail. Most of the "beating" is metal-to-metal because of that. The tieplate
      also distributes the impact to the wood over a larger area.

      If you look at your z track, you will see this area of the plastic
      tie/sleeper as slightly raised on either side of the rail, and the little
      "fingers" that hold the track to the tie/sleeper represent the spikes. It
      also probably represents the European solution(s) too. But in z scale, the
      detail in this area is so small, its hard to tell exactly which side of the
      pond is being prototyped.

      In the case of z track, you have to use a sharp knife to remove the simulated
      tieplate/spikes from the top of the tie/sleeper before you can slide the
      tie/sleeper under a rail that has a railjoiner on it (especially Peco).

      How do they solve this problem on your side of the great swimming pool?

      Bill Kronenberger
      Houston
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