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Re: [YugoUnitedGVOwners] Re: Carb icing

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  • Jonathan Ranney
    This discussion is very good. However, when it its below Zero air temp with 40-50mph vehicle speed, I still say you better have a bottle of dry gas in the
    Message 1 of 29 , Jan 1, 2010
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      This discussion is very good. However, when it its below Zero air temp with 40-50mph vehicle speed, I still say you better have a bottle of dry gas in the spare tire! Cause your going to need it.

      Jon

      --- On Fri, 1/1/10, DANIEL BOGUSE <rustycat97@...> wrote:

      From: DANIEL BOGUSE <rustycat97@...>
      Subject: Re: [YugoUnitedGVOwners] Re: Carb icing
      To: yugounitedgvowners2@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, January 1, 2010, 1:21 AM

       

      That is why they put the pre heat hose on carb engines,Even after your engine warms up and is running at normal temps,you shouldn't have icing problems.The gas we have now a days has 10% methanal in it and should keep any water out of the system.Maybe you got a bad tank of gas loaded with water.

      --- On Wed, 12/30/09, JEFF FAHRINGER <joffrey1@verizon. net> wrote:

      From: JEFF FAHRINGER <joffrey1@verizon. net>
      Subject: [YugoUnitedGVOwners ] Re: Carb icing
      To: yugounitedgvowners2 @yahoogroups. com
      Date: Wednesday, December 30, 2009, 11:25 AM

       

      Good point about the size difference, Dave.

      Ben, how much of a pressure drop does the venturi make?  More when the air is going faster, right? So if the venturi is the major cause of the icing, then it should be worse at wide open throttle.  I find icing happens when traveling the highway at a steady partial opening. I theorize this is because the engine vacuum on the nearly closed throttle plate with trhe engine turning at 3500rpm is a bigger drop in pressure. Makes sense that the icing might mess up the venturi effect that draws the fuel out, thereby affecting  the engine more than an FI engine would.  My high compression FI 1500 makes lots of  vacuum at steady speed.

       

      Jeff



    • JEFF FAHRINGER
      That is why they put the pre heat hose on carb engines,Even after your engine warms up and is running at normal temps,you shouldn t have icing problems.The
      Message 2 of 29 , Jan 1, 2010
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        That is why they put the pre heat hose on carb engines,Even after your engine warms up and is running at normal temps,you shouldn't have icing problems.The gas we have now a days has 10% methanal in it and should keep any water out of the system.Maybe you got a bad tank of gas loaded with water.”

         

        Carb ice is formed from atmospheric moisture  and  happens at normal engine temps.    Wait, is that your real last name?

         

        Jeff Fahringer

        (570) 994-6928

        Balloon Twisting Stilt Walker

        Inventor & Creator of Unusual Musical Instruments

         

      • Bill Schulz
        Dan l- No icing after being warmed up? Hogwash! I ve had a carb ice up at about 40 deg. F after running full-throttle up a two mile long grade with a fully
        Message 3 of 29 , Jan 1, 2010
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          Dan'l-

          No icing after being warmed up? Hogwash! I've had a carb ice up at about 40 deg. F after running full-throttle up a two mile long grade with a fully warmed engine. It was with a year and a half old '58 600. I'd neglected to switch the air-cleaner intake from "E" ("estate," or "summer" in Italian) to "I" ("inverno," "winter). A couple of minutes on the side of the road while I did the air cleaner switcheroo and I was on my way again, smarter than before.

          Flying a carbureted aircraft REQUIRES "carb heat" to be applied when throttling back in the landing pattern (the last thing you want is to have the fan go limp when you're close to the ground). Of course, you then have to remember to remove the carb heat on short final in case you need full power to do a go-around.

          And all this applies even when the outside air temps are into the 80s and above. There is NEVER a time when a carbed aircraft engine is not subjected to the possibility of icing.

          Happy new year, all, and, to paraphrase, may all your troubles be (confined to minor ones with the) little ones (your Yugos).

          wjs... Leesburg, FL
          FIATs for 51 years. Or
          "Some people never learn!"


           
           


          --- On Thu, 12/31/09, DANIEL BOGUSE <rustycat97@...> wrote:

          From: DANIEL BOGUSE <rustycat97@...>
          Subject: Re: [YugoUnitedGVOwners] Re: Carb icing
          To: yugounitedgvowners2@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thursday, December 31, 2009, 8:21 PM

           

          That is why they put the pre heat hose on carb engines,Even after your engine warms up and is running at normal temps,you shouldn't have icing problems.The gas we have now a days has 10% methanal in it and should keep any water out of the system.Maybe you got a bad tank of gas loaded with water.

          --- On Wed, 12/30/09, JEFF FAHRINGER <joffrey1@verizon. net> wrote:

          From: JEFF FAHRINGER <joffrey1@verizon. net>
          Subject: [YugoUnitedGVOwners ] Re: Carb icing
          To: yugounitedgvowners2 @yahoogroups. com
          Date: Wednesday, December 30, 2009, 11:25 AM

           

          Good point about the size difference, Dave.

          Ben, how much of a pressure drop does the venturi make?  More when the air is going faster, right? So if the venturi is the major cause of the icing, then it should be worse at wide open throttle.  I find icing happens when traveling the highway at a steady partial opening. I theorize this is because the engine vacuum on the nearly closed throttle plate with trhe engine turning at 3500rpm is a bigger drop in pressure. Makes sense that the icing might mess up the venturi effect that draws the fuel out, thereby affecting  the engine more than an FI engine would.  My high compression FI 1500 makes lots of  vacuum at steady speed.

           

          Jeff



        • Bill Schulz
          Jon- Until 97 I ve done all my winter driving in the northeast with carbureted cars and had only one icing problem and that was my fault. And I ve never used
          Message 4 of 29 , Jan 1, 2010
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            Jon-

            Until '97 I've done all my winter driving in the northeast with carbureted cars and had only one icing problem and that was my fault. And I've never used dry gas. That stuff will not prevent carb icing, only gas line freezing. Buying gas from a high-volume dealer helps assure you don't get water in the fuel. Running it through in a fairly short time
            -- say a tankfull a week-- prevents getting much condensation-based water in the fuel.Topping up and keeping the tank as full as is practical also helps prevent in-tank condensation.

            wjs... Leesburg, FL
            FIATs for 51 years. Or
            "Some people never learn!"


             
             


            --- On Fri, 1/1/10, Jonathan Ranney <fiatpwr@...> wrote:

            From: Jonathan Ranney <fiatpwr@...>
            Subject: Re: [YugoUnitedGVOwners] Re: Carb icing
            To: yugounitedgvowners2@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Friday, January 1, 2010, 6:38 AM

             

            This discussion is very good. However, when it its below Zero air temp with 40-50mph vehicle speed, I still say you better have a bottle of dry gas in the spare tire! Cause your going to need it.

            Jon

            --- On Fri, 1/1/10, DANIEL BOGUSE <rustycat97@yahoo. com> wrote:

            From: DANIEL BOGUSE <rustycat97@yahoo. com>
            Subject: Re: [YugoUnitedGVOwners ] Re: Carb icing
            To: yugounitedgvowners2 @yahoogroups. com
            Date: Friday, January 1, 2010, 1:21 AM

             

            That is why they put the pre heat hose on carb engines,Even after your engine warms up and is running at normal temps,you shouldn't have icing problems.The gas we have now a days has 10% methanal in it and should keep any water out of the system.Maybe you got a bad tank of gas loaded with water.

            --- On Wed, 12/30/09, JEFF FAHRINGER <joffrey1@verizon. net> wrote:

            From: JEFF FAHRINGER <joffrey1@verizon. net>
            Subject: [YugoUnitedGVOwners ] Re: Carb icing
            To: yugounitedgvowners2 @yahoogroups. com
            Date: Wednesday, December 30, 2009, 11:25 AM

             

            Good point about the size difference, Dave.

            Ben, how much of a pressure drop does the venturi make?  More when the air is going faster, right? So if the venturi is the major cause of the icing, then it should be worse at wide open throttle.  I find icing happens when traveling the highway at a steady partial opening. I theorize this is because the engine vacuum on the nearly closed throttle plate with trhe engine turning at 3500rpm is a bigger drop in pressure. Makes sense that the icing might mess up the venturi effect that draws the fuel out, thereby affecting  the engine more than an FI engine would.  My high compression FI 1500 makes lots of  vacuum at steady speed.

             

            Jeff




          • daveyugo@aol.com
            It s not the gas that ices it is the humidity in the air DaveYugo
            Message 5 of 29 , Jan 1, 2010
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              It's not the gas that ices it is the humidity in the air
               
              DaveYugo
            • Christopher Conlon
              Agreed...that did help me up here in New Hampshire....just like you said when I hit the highway at a cruisin 50mph and the temps are under 20...the car has
              Message 6 of 29 , Jan 1, 2010
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                Agreed...that did help me up here in New Hampshire....just like you said when I hit the highway at a cruisin 50mph and the temps are under 20...the car has nothing but issues!  Dry gas at hat time does help!

                -Chris

                --- On Fri, 1/1/10, Jonathan Ranney <fiatpwr@...> wrote:

                From: Jonathan Ranney <fiatpwr@...>
                Subject: Re: [YugoUnitedGVOwners] Re: Carb icing
                To: yugounitedgvowners2@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Friday, January 1, 2010, 6:38 AM

                 

                This discussion is very good. However, when it its below Zero air temp with 40-50mph vehicle speed, I still say you better have a bottle of dry gas in the spare tire! Cause your going to need it.

                Jon

                --- On Fri, 1/1/10, DANIEL BOGUSE <rustycat97@yahoo. com> wrote:

                From: DANIEL BOGUSE <rustycat97@yahoo. com>
                Subject: Re: [YugoUnitedGVOwners ] Re: Carb icing
                To: yugounitedgvowners2 @yahoogroups. com
                Date: Friday, January 1, 2010, 1:21 AM

                 

                That is why they put the pre heat hose on carb engines,Even after your engine warms up and is running at normal temps,you shouldn't have icing problems.The gas we have now a days has 10% methanal in it and should keep any water out of the system.Maybe you got a bad tank of gas loaded with water.

                --- On Wed, 12/30/09, JEFF FAHRINGER <joffrey1@verizon. net> wrote:

                From: JEFF FAHRINGER <joffrey1@verizon. net>
                Subject: [YugoUnitedGVOwners ] Re: Carb icing
                To: yugounitedgvowners2 @yahoogroups. com
                Date: Wednesday, December 30, 2009, 11:25 AM

                 

                Good point about the size difference, Dave.

                Ben, how much of a pressure drop does the venturi make?  More when the air is going faster, right? So if the venturi is the major cause of the icing, then it should be worse at wide open throttle.  I find icing happens when traveling the highway at a steady partial opening. I theorize this is because the engine vacuum on the nearly closed throttle plate with trhe engine turning at 3500rpm is a bigger drop in pressure. Makes sense that the icing might mess up the venturi effect that draws the fuel out, thereby affecting  the engine more than an FI engine would.  My high compression FI 1500 makes lots of  vacuum at steady speed.

                 

                Jeff




              • DANIEL BOGUSE
                when it s that cold out like the man was saying,then the air is very dry. ... From: daveyugo@aol.com Subject: Re: [YugoUnitedGVOwners] Re:
                Message 7 of 29 , Jan 1, 2010
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                  when it's that cold out like the man was saying,then the air is very dry.

                  --- On Fri, 1/1/10, daveyugo@... <daveyugo@...> wrote:

                  From: daveyugo@... <daveyugo@...>
                  Subject: Re: [YugoUnitedGVOwners] Re: Carb icing
                  To: yugounitedgvowners2@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Friday, January 1, 2010, 1:06 PM

                   
                  It's not the gas that ices it is the humidity in the air
                   
                  DaveYugo

                • Art Hughes
                  Been ignoring the Dry Gas controversy. The only thing Dry Gas is good for is to eliminate condensation in the fuel tank. Once, every say 4 tankfuls, is often
                  Message 8 of 29 , Jan 1, 2010
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                    Been ignoring the Dry Gas controversy.
                     
                    The only thing Dry Gas is good for is to eliminate condensation in the fuel tank. Once, every say 4 tankfuls, is often enough, and mostly just for Northern States where we have cold weather and frequent high humidity. Using a tankful or more a week, you'd expect to not have any real need for Dry Gas.
                    Dry Gas allows a chemical reaction to mix the water into the fuel, so it will pass thru the fuel system, and allow that mix to burn in combustion. Otherwise, you would have engine missing, and stalling.
                     
                    It won't stop carb icing, and won't hurt anything. The carb preheat systems will keep carb icing from happening, EXCEPT for those that don't keep the oil changed, and do too much short trip driving, then go on the road for a trip. Takes lots of miles to burn all the condensation out of the oil. You can still get carb Icing up to 55 degrees ambient temps, if you get in rain, or snow up to 40 degrees, and don't keep the oil fresh.
                     
                    Carb preheat hoses are best if they have a covering of paper, with metal inside. The metal retains heat, the paper keeps the metal warm. Plain metal ones won't transfer enough heat from the exhaust manifold, as they have a large surface area with all the ribbing, and quickly cool the hot air inside them. A plain paper one is better than a plain metal one.
                     
                    Art Hughes  Columbus, Ohio  USA
                     
                     Visit   www.wvaanne.com   Art's List of Family Connections, WV Rt  87
                                         Genealogy in Jackson and Mason Counties, WV
                     
                                                        

                  • fontwochicken@juno.com
                    Right on Art! You know it and said it as I would have. On Fri, 1 Jan 2010 13:49:10 -0800 (PST) Art Hughes writes: Been ignoring the Dry
                    Message 9 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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                      Right on Art!  You know it and said it as I would have.
                       
                      On Fri, 1 Jan 2010 13:49:10 -0800 (PST) Art Hughes <pro4art@...> writes:
                       

                      Been ignoring the Dry Gas controversy.
                       
                      The only thing Dry Gas is good for is to eliminate condensation in the fuel tank. Once, every say 4 tankfuls, is often enough, and mostly just for Northern States where we have cold weather and frequent high humidity. Using a tankful or more a week, you'd expect to not have any real need for Dry Gas.
                      Dry Gas allows a chemical reaction to mix the water into the fuel, so it will pass thru the fuel system, and allow that mix to burn in combustion. Otherwise, you would have engine missing, and stalling.
                       
                      It won't stop carb icing, and won't hurt anything. The carb preheat systems will keep carb icing from happening, EXCEPT for those that don't keep the oil changed, and do too much short trip driving, then go on the road for a trip. Takes lots of miles to burn all the condensation out of the oil. You can still get carb Icing up to 55 degrees ambient temps, if you get in rain, or snow up to 40 degrees, and don't keep the oil fresh.
                       
                      Carb preheat hoses are best if they have a covering of paper, with metal inside. The metal retains heat, the paper keeps the metal warm. Plain metal ones won't transfer enough heat from the exhaust manifold, as they have a large surface area with all the ribbing, and quickly cool the hot air inside them. A plain paper one is better than a plain metal one.
                       
                      Art Hughes  Columbus, Ohio  USA
                       
                       Visit   www.wvaanne. com   Art's List of Family Connections, WV Rt  87
                                           Genealogy in Jackson and Mason Counties, WV
                       
                                                          

                       


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                    • Bill Schulz
                      It s at partial throttle where the biggest pressure drop takes place, the greatest degree of strangulation or throttling, that atmospheric hum-diddy is doin
                      Message 10 of 29 , Jan 3, 2010
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                        It's at partial throttle where the biggest pressure drop takes place, the greatest degree of strangulation or "throttling," that atmospheric hum-diddy is doin' you in. Check all aspects of the heat-riser operation as it sounds like that's the culprit.

                        wjs... Leesburg, FL
                        FIATs for 51 years. Or
                        "Some people never learn!"


                         
                         


                        --- On Fri, 1/1/10, Christopher Conlon <crconlon@...> wrote:

                        From: Christopher Conlon <crconlon@...>
                        Subject: Re: [YugoUnitedGVOwners] Re: Carb icing
                        To: yugounitedgvowners2@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Friday, January 1, 2010, 4:04 PM

                         

                        Agreed...that did help me up here in New Hampshire... .just like you said when I hit the highway at a cruisin 50mph and the temps are under 20...the car has nothing but issues!  Dry gas at hat time does help!

                        -Chris

                        --- On Fri, 1/1/10, Jonathan Ranney <fiatpwr@yahoo. com> wrote:

                        From: Jonathan Ranney <fiatpwr@yahoo. com>
                        Subject: Re: [YugoUnitedGVOwners ] Re: Carb icing
                        To: yugounitedgvowners2 @yahoogroups. com
                        Date: Friday, January 1, 2010, 6:38 AM

                         

                        This discussion is very good. However, when it its below Zero air temp with 40-50mph vehicle speed, I still say you better have a bottle of dry gas in the spare tire! Cause your going to need it.

                        Jon

                        --- On Fri, 1/1/10, DANIEL BOGUSE <rustycat97@yahoo. com> wrote:

                        From: DANIEL BOGUSE <rustycat97@yahoo. com>
                        Subject: Re: [YugoUnitedGVOwners ] Re: Carb icing
                        To: yugounitedgvowners2 @yahoogroups. com
                        Date: Friday, January 1, 2010, 1:21 AM

                         

                        That is why they put the pre heat hose on carb engines,Even after your engine warms up and is running at normal temps,you shouldn't have icing problems.The gas we have now a days has 10% methanal in it and should keep any water out of the system.Maybe you got a bad tank of gas loaded with water.

                        --- On Wed, 12/30/09, JEFF FAHRINGER <joffrey1@verizon. net> wrote:

                        From: JEFF FAHRINGER <joffrey1@verizon. net>
                        Subject: [YugoUnitedGVOwners ] Re: Carb icing
                        To: yugounitedgvowners2 @yahoogroups. com
                        Date: Wednesday, December 30, 2009, 11:25 AM

                         

                        Good point about the size difference, Dave.

                        Ben, how much of a pressure drop does the venturi make?  More when the air is going faster, right? So if the venturi is the major cause of the icing, then it should be worse at wide open throttle.  I find icing happens when traveling the highway at a steady partial opening. I theorize this is because the engine vacuum on the nearly closed throttle plate with trhe engine turning at 3500rpm is a bigger drop in pressure. Makes sense that the icing might mess up the venturi effect that draws the fuel out, thereby affecting  the engine more than an FI engine would.  My high compression FI 1500 makes lots of  vacuum at steady speed.

                         

                        Jeff





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