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statins

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  • Billsfan
    I saw my doc yesterday, liver count 63, a little high. I m taking Rebif and zocor, attacking ms with a one two punch. My doc said my HDL is 1.5 and my LDL
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2003
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      I saw my doc yesterday, liver count 63, a little high. I'm taking Rebif
      and zocor, attacking ms with a one two punch. My doc said my HDL is
      1.5 and my LDL (the bad one) is .49 , very good cholesterol numbers.
      He said if there is clogging in my arteries it would be reversing. I
      think with Ms the clogging occurs in the small blood vessels as per
      Swank and his Ms diet book. I thin genes and viruses may be factors
      with this too.

      As far as Ms symptoms go I'm walking better, don't get as tired waiting
      in lines, like at the bank, I'm more awake too, not quite as tired as I
      used to be, It's not a miraculous improvement and it's hard to say how
      much, but I would say I'm 10 to 20% better than before and I feel the
      numbness is diminishing
    • Billsfan
      Your cholesterol drug may prevent Alzheimer s disease, diabetes, even cancer by Jordan Matus Originally designed to lower bad LDL cholesterol, the group of
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 3, 2003
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        Your cholesterol drug may prevent Alzheimer's disease,
        diabetes, even cancer

        by Jordan Matus



        Originally designed to lower bad LDL cholesterol, the group of
        drugs called statins have become the Swiss Army Knife of the
        medical world. They're useful for so many conditions that doctors
        are "joking about when we're going to add these medicines to the
        water," says one Mayo Clinic expert.

        Statins have been shown to reduce the risk of heart attack,
        stroke, angina, and arrhythmia in many ways. They have powerful
        antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, reducing markers for
        inflammation 2 weeks after you start taking them.

        "Even patients with normal cholesterol levels and no previous
        history of heart disease appear to show survival benefits from
        statins," says Randal Thomas, MD, internist and preventive
        cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic. These same benefits aren't
        restricted to the cardiovascular system. Early studies have
        indicated that statins may also reduce the risk of Alzheimer's
        disease and other forms of dementia. "The reason for this may be
        that the drug prevents tiny blood vessels in the brain from being
        clogged," explains Ralph Sacco, MD, associate chairman of
        neurology at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York
        City.

        Another possible statin target is osteoporosis. LDL cholesterol
        stimulates cells that cause bones to break down. By reducing
        levels of this cholesterol, statins may help preserve bone in this
        crippling disease.

        Another intriguing study suggests that the drugs could also
        decrease the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is a complex
        disease that is associated with a systemic inflammatory process,
        so the anti-inflammatory properties of statin medications may
        counter that, says Dr. Thomas.

        A Japanese animal trial showed that statins could potentially be
        used to treat pancreatic cancer and its spread to the liver. "I
        believe that statins switch off the motor that regulates cancer cell
        invasion," says Toshiyuki Kusama, MD, biochemist at the Osaka
        Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases. In heart
        disease, statins short-circuit an enzyme called HMG-CoA
        reductase, which the liver needs to form cholesterol. It has
        another role in the body: proper functioning of epidermal growth
        factor, a substance which, when it goes haywire, encourages
        pancreatic cancer cells to invade other organs and grow into
        tumors.

        Caution: While statins are generally safe, they can have serious
        side effects.

        Page 1 of 1


        Jordan Matus is a regular contributor to Prevention's Medical
        Breakthroughs section.
      • Billsfan
        My doctor said today that he thought it is not the lowering of cholesterol by statins which is the reason statins help people with Ms but that it is because
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 18, 2003
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          My doctor said today that he thought it is not the lowering of
          cholesterol by statins which is the reason statins help people with Ms
          but that it is because" the anti-imflammatory effect of statins is
          pervasive", quoting my doctor.
        • Billsfan
          my pharmacist told me after spending some time to research the matter, that statins take about 10 hours to get through the filter of the liver and start
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 12, 2003
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            my pharmacist told me after spending some time to research the matter,
            that statins take about 10 hours to get through the "filter" of the
            liver and start working. Their is a maximum of how much statins our
            bodies can handle or how much can " go through" the filter of the
            liver. I'm taking 80 mg or 4x20mg every day, 4 pills I mean. I think
            80mg a day is the maximum dose. I'll try and get my liver checked next
            week and ask my doctor what's going on with stem cells. I think my head
            feels better, can think more clearly but no miracles in terms of being
            back like I was before without any numbness.
            Bill
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