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Re: 2012 Lenten Challenge

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  • Rick M
    We re a few weeks into the Lenten Challenge and I wondered how everyone was doing with their practice? If you ve fallen off the wagon, then get back on! It s
    Message 1 of 15 , Mar 12, 2012
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      We're a few weeks into the Lenten Challenge and I wondered how everyone was
      doing with their practice?

      If you've fallen off the wagon, then get back on! It's as easy as that.

      For myself, the last few weeks have been a challenge. Overhauling the main
      bathroom in the house has been a late winter project. It's been quite a workout
      climinb up and down ladders, etc.; however the results have been worth it.

      I'm not as young as I used to be and am a little beat up as a result.

      Keeping with the Lenten Challenge though, I didn't count the physical labor as
      my work out. I've just stayed up later, stretched out more and am still
      continuing with my martial arts practice.

      The Mrs is starting a new job today. It's full time in retail and she's not
      going to have the classic 9-5 hours that she was used to in previous jobs. Some
      days she'll have to start at 7 pm, and on others she'll have to close which
      won't get her home until around 10 pm. She'll also have to work most weekends.

      I'm planning on structuring my training around her schedule. On the early days
      she'll have to get up at 5:30 which is an hour earlier than I usually get up.
      I'll just get up with her and I'll have an extra hour every morning to practice.
      I'll also continue to practice in the evening, so this will be something of a
      boost for my own training.

      Best Regards,
      Rick
      http://CookDingsKitchen.blogspot.com
    • Rick M
      The 2012 Lenten Challenge is over! How did you do? Best Regards, Rick http://CookDingsKitchen.blogspot.com
      Message 2 of 15 , Apr 7, 2012
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        The 2012 Lenten Challenge is over! How did you do?

        Best Regards,

        Rick
        http://CookDingsKitchen.blogspot.com

        --- In yoshinkan@yahoogroups.com, "Rick M" <rickmatz@...> wrote:
        >
        > Every year, I throw out the Lenten Challenge to my martial arts buddies. It has nothing to do with Christianity or religion. We are simply using this time as a convenient reminder to rededicate ourselves to our training. It's kind of hard to miss either Fat Tuesday (Mardi Gras, the last day before Lent, which is also Paczki Day!) or Easter Sunday (Bunnies, candy, colored eggs; that stuff).
        >
        > Several of us have been doing this for years now.
        >
        > The challenge is this: from Ash Wednesday (Feb 22) until the day before Easter (April 7), train every day, without fail, no excuses; even if you have to move mountains. Simple enough said, a little harder to do.
        >
        > It's not as easy as it sounds; things come up. Some days, you might only be able to get a few minutes of training in; but the point is to do it everyday, no matter what.
        >
        > It doesn't have to be martial arts training either. Whatever it is that you need to really rededicate yourself to: studying, practicing an instrument, walking, watching what you eat; anything - do it every day, without fail.
        >
        > In the past on some forums, people have posted what they've done everyday. I think everyone who's done that has become tired of writing, and the others get tired of reading it. How about you just post if you've had some breakthrough, or you've had to overcome some unusual circumstance to continue your training? Maybe just check in every once in a while to let everyone know you're keeping at it, or to encourage everyone else to keep at it.
        >
        > If you fail, no one will hate you. If you fall off of the wagon, climb back on board. Start anew.
        >
        > For those of you who insist that you really do train everyday anyway, by all means continue and be supportive of the rest of us. For the rest of us who intend to train everyday, but sometimes come up short due to life's propensity for unraveling even the best laid plans, here is an opportunity to put a stake in the ground and show your resolution.
        >
        > Won't you join me?
        >
        > Best Regards
        >
        > Rick
        >
      • John Corr
        Hi folks, I was youtubing the other day and came across footage of a jo kata that has 31 movements in it. The name of it was in Japanese, so I don t know
        Message 3 of 15 , Apr 10, 2012
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          Hi folks,
          I was youtubing the other day and came across footage of a jo kata that has 31 movements in it. The name of it was in Japanese, so I don't know exactly what it's called, but this video was from a Yoshinkan dojo in Japan (I think Ando Sensei's?). When I looked for other footage of this kata, however, many of the videos seemed to be aikikai or some other, more gentle styles of aikido. Does anyone know the history of this kata? Was it unique to one particular style of aikido and then adopted laterally into other styles, or does it stem from an earlier, pre-formalization era and passed down through Ueshiba O-Sensei's different students? Or was it perhaps taken from jodo more recently?

          Not writing a research paper, here, just wondering.
          Thanks,
          John


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Charles Yeomans
          ... It s possible that this is the 31-count jo kata attributed to Saito sensei. Charles Yeomans
          Message 4 of 15 , Apr 10, 2012
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            On Apr 10, 2012, at 12:02 PM, John Corr wrote:

            > Hi folks,
            > I was youtubing the other day and came across footage of a jo kata that has 31 movements in it. The name of it was in Japanese, so I don't know exactly what it's called, but this video was from a Yoshinkan dojo in Japan (I think Ando Sensei's?). When I looked for other footage of this kata, however, many of the videos seemed to be aikikai or some other, more gentle styles of aikido. Does anyone know the history of this kata? Was it unique to one particular style of aikido and then adopted laterally into other styles, or does it stem from an earlier, pre-formalization era and passed down through Ueshiba O-Sensei's different students? Or was it perhaps taken from jodo more recently?
            >
            > Not writing a research paper, here, just wondering.
            > Thanks,
            > John
            >


            It's possible that this is the 31-count jo kata attributed to Saito sensei.


            Charles Yeomans
          • Daryl Hartz
            Hi John, Do you have a link to the video? Healthy regards, Daryl To: yoshinkan@yahoogroups.com From: johnpcorr@yahoo.com Date: Tue, 10 Apr 2012 09:02:10 -0700
            Message 5 of 15 , Apr 10, 2012
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              Hi John,

              Do you have a link to the video?

              Healthy regards,

              Daryl


              To: yoshinkan@yahoogroups.com
              From: johnpcorr@...
              Date: Tue, 10 Apr 2012 09:02:10 -0700
              Subject: [Yoshinkan] 31 "moves" Jo Kata?




























              Hi folks,

              I was youtubing the other day and came across footage of a jo kata that has 31 movements in it. The name of it was in Japanese, so I don't know exactly what it's called, but this video was from a Yoshinkan dojo in Japan (I think Ando Sensei's?). When I looked for other footage of this kata, however, many of the videos seemed to be aikikai or some other, more gentle styles of aikido. Does anyone know the history of this kata? Was it unique to one particular style of aikido and then adopted laterally into other styles, or does it stem from an earlier, pre-formalization era and passed down through Ueshiba O-Sensei's different students? Or was it perhaps taken from jodo more recently?



              Not writing a research paper, here, just wondering.

              Thanks,

              John



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Steven Miranda
              Based on his many interviews with Aiki News and Aikido Journal, this kata was developed by Saito Sensei as Charles mentioned. I believe Ando Sensei was a nidan
              Message 6 of 15 , Apr 10, 2012
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                Based on his many interviews with Aiki News and Aikido Journal, this kata was developed by Saito Sensei as Charles mentioned. I believe Ando Sensei was a nidan in Aikikai before joining the Yoshinkan. There are several videos running around Youtube that show him and/or his students doing this.


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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Steven
                Go to Youtube and search on YoshinkanAikidoRyu.
                Message 7 of 15 , Apr 10, 2012
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                  Go to Youtube and search on YoshinkanAikidoRyu.


                  --- In yoshinkan@yahoogroups.com, Daryl Hartz <darylhartz@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi John,
                  >
                  > Do you have a link to the video?
                  >
                  > Healthy regards,
                  >
                  > Daryl
                  >
                  >
                • John Corr
                  Thanks all, for the response. This makes more sense to me now, and raises interesting possibilities about how different aikido styles might borrow from one
                  Message 8 of 15 , Apr 10, 2012
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                    Thanks all, for the response. This makes more sense to me now, and raises interesting possibilities about how different aikido styles might borrow from one another (not something I'm generally interested in; I have enough on my plate getting the Yoshinkan techniques down).


                    Here's the one I looked at, which I think is also the one Steven pointed to:

                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHIvj0Aixw4&list=UUudM0TVgxwKxE4811stzB7g&index=1&feature=plcp

                    The body movements in this clip look very "Yoshinkany" (energy focused forward, crisp movements performed to a count), but the jo kamae is different from what we do with Kimeda Sensei here in Ontario (in aikido class, I don't study jodo). What also got me asking was the fact that other youtube videos of this technique have people who are sort of floating along with their posture a little less severe, their movements a little less forward-extending. Comparing them makes for an interesting exercise in how posture and focusing energy define styles in aikido, perhaps more so than the techniques themselves. But again, I'm basing this observation on very little data! (Just one kata, albeit one with 31 whole moves in it!) 

                    Thanks again,
                    John

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Alan Shumak Sensei
                    OSU! Yes, That is Ando Sensei s dojo. And it is taken from the SaitoSensei Iwama Style Jo Sanjuichi no kata. Just wondering if it was being practiced prior to
                    Message 9 of 15 , Apr 10, 2012
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                      OSU!



                      Yes, That is Ando Sensei's dojo. And it is taken from the SaitoSensei Iwama
                      Style Jo Sanjuichi no kata. Just wondering if it was being practiced prior
                      to his visit to our dojo back in the mid 90's or since!



                      Thanks,

                      Alan

                      _________________________________________________

                      Alan Shumak - Toronto Aikido Centre _S\�_

                      <mailto:dojo@...> dojo@...

                      <http://www.torontoaikido.com/> http://www.torontoaikido.com

                      _________________________________________________





                      From: yoshinkan@yahoogroups.com [mailto:yoshinkan@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                      Of John Corr
                      Sent: April-10-12 1:46 PM
                      To: yoshinkan@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [Yoshinkan] Re: 31 "moves" Jo Kata?





                      Thanks all, for the response. This makes more sense to me now, and raises
                      interesting possibilities about how different aikido styles might borrow
                      from one another (not something I'm generally interested in; I have enough
                      on my plate getting the Yoshinkan techniques down).

                      Here's the one I looked at, which I think is also the one Steven pointed to:

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHIvj0Aixw4
                      <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHIvj0Aixw4&list=UUudM0TVgxwKxE4811stzB7g&in
                      dex=1&feature=plcp> &list=UUudM0TVgxwKxE4811stzB7g&index=1&feature=plcp

                      The body movements in this clip look very "Yoshinkany" (energy focused
                      forward, crisp movements performed to a count), but the jo kamae is
                      different from what we do with Kimeda Sensei here in Ontario (in aikido
                      class, I don't study jodo). What also got me asking was the fact that other
                      youtube videos of this technique have people who are sort of floating along
                      with their posture a little less severe, their movements a little less
                      forward-extending. Comparing them makes for an interesting exercise in how
                      posture and focusing energy define styles in aikido, perhaps more so than
                      the techniques themselves. But again, I'm basing this observation on very
                      little data! (Just one kata, albeit one with 31 whole moves in it!)

                      Thanks again,
                      John

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • John Corr
                      While we re on the topic of jo practice, I ve also been wondering about the benefits of training with a jo versus training with a bokken. Both are valuable,
                      Message 10 of 15 , Apr 12, 2012
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                        While we're on the topic of jo practice, I've also been wondering about the benefits of training with a jo versus training with a bokken. Both are valuable, but would one benefit empty-hand technique in aikido more than the other? Why?
                        John

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Samuel COMBES
                        my opinion each has benefit due to the hands being closer on bokken and farther apart on jo waza osu
                        Message 11 of 15 , Apr 12, 2012
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                          my opinion each has benefit due to the hands being closer on bokken and farther apart on jo waza
                          osu
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